How to Know When Your Employees Are About to Jump Ship

Employee retention is always a hot topic – the cost of turnover is high, and the competition is constantly seeking ways to land top talent (especially your top talent). But identifying and preventing an employee from seeking greener pastures can be somewhat elusive.ID-10057575

While there is no specific formula for predicting when an employee will leave, there are certain indicators that can identify when an employee is considering jumping ship and heading elsewhere. Keeping an eye out for these key factors can help you spring into action and go the extra mile to keep top talent where they belong:

  1. Less contribution. When an employee starts to mentally “check out” of conversations and meetings, it could mean that he or she is preparing to make a clean break, or that the employee simply doesn’t care about his or her job anymore. There could be a few things at play here, but if an employee who typically chimes in often and offers constructive ideas suddenly starts to clam up, it could be a bad sign.
  2. Different clothes. Yes, how an employee dresses can be a sign of impending two-week notice. If your team typically wears khakis and a polo, but suddenly an employee starts showing up in a button-down shirt and dress slacks, it could be a sign that there are job interviews on the schedule. Conversely, if business suits are expected in your workplace and you find an employee suddenly inching toward business casual, it might indicate that something is brewing.
  3. Personal crises. When something dramatic happens – a death in the family, illness, divorce, or something similar – these circumstances can often cause people to assess their current life situations and determine what, if any, changes should occur. Oftentimes, jobs and careers are one area where people feel empowered to make changes.
  4. Not-so-social butterfly. For many businesses, team lunches or after-hours social activities are great team builders that build camaraderie. If one of your employees suddenly drops out of these activities, it could be a sign that he or she is trying to create distance from the team due to an impending departure.

What should you do now? 

If some of these factors are tipping you off to a possible departure of one of your employees, it’s a great time to pull this employee in and have a non-confrontational talk – how are things going? What’s new? Are you happy here? Based on the answers to those questions, your organization could find itself in a range of situations. And when your employees decide to move on, or you’re looking for more superstars to add to your team, call Helpmates. Our network includes talented professionals from across Southern California who are ready to jump in and make an immediate impact.

Image Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/David Castillo Dominici

Is Your Onboarding Process Alienating New Employees?

Employee onboarding is traditionally a key part of employee development. Getting off to a good start is key to a successful, long-term career. Right?

In today’s fast-paced world where team members where multiple hats and have varying responsibilities, onboarding can be one area that falls by the wayside. But especially in today’s fast-paced world, this is where a solid onboarding plan is especially critical. Here’s why:ID-100162795

  • Turnover is too expensive. The cost to hire a new employee is often estimated at 150% of that employee’s salary. Not to mention the productivity and morale hits that will tax your office when a new employee gets off to a bad start, only to leave a short while later.
  • It can lead to unnecessary training. We’re all busy, and it can seem like a burden to spend some time with a new employee to show him or her the ropes and help be sure that employee is settled into the company. But, that short upfront time burden can prevent extra headaches down the road when your employee suffers from ignorance over company policies or procedures. It’s not fun for the employee and it’s certainly not fun for you – answering even more questions or fixing mistakes and issues that could arise.
  • Better camaraderie. It’s hard being the “new kid,” no matter how old you are or how many jobs you’ve had. Successful onboarding can help prevent awkward moments in the lunchroom when you don’t know anyone’s name and have nowhere to sit. It helps foster a sense of teamwork early on for new employees, and can make a huge difference when you’re just starting out.

Onboarding can make a tremendous impact on your organization – both positive and negative. Are you worried that your organization is tipping the scales toward negative? Here are some signs that your onboarding process is alienating new employees:

  1. Your idea of onboarding includes a stack of HR forms. HR forms are necessary for all new employees, but a successful onboarding program, they do not make! Businesses are hopping and everyone is busy, but if your onboarding program doesn’t have clearly defined steps and goals for successfully adding a new member to your team, you are alienating new employees and setting them up for failure.
  2. You are constantly interrupted or distracted. Have you ever been in a meeting (on a date, out with friends) only to have the other person stare at his or her phone the entire time? Take calls, send texts, respond to “just one” email? This behavior is not only rude, it tells the other person explicitly that they’re not important. Talk about alienation! It goes unsaid that this is not the message to send to your new employees. Make onboarding a priority – make your new employee’s success a priority – and your employees will find greater productivity and success.
  3. You don’t have equipment ready. Could you do your job without a desk, chair, computer or phone? Neither can your new employees. The first day at a new job is nerve-wracking and potentially awkward enough – imagine if you came in and had nowhere to sit, go, or call your own. For the employer, onboarding should begin before the employee shows up for his or her first day – have a phone ready, have the computer set up and ready to use (setting up email is even better), and have a chair (preferably not the broken chair that has been passed around your office for five years). A solid start means solid equipment.

Have you ever had an onboarding disaster? What has your organization done to prevent one from occurring? Here at Helpmates, we help organizations across Southern California find the talent they need to reach their goals. We’ll find your next superstars!

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