Want the Best Talent? Avoid These Top Recruiter Mistakes. 

You’re an experienced, savvy recruiter. You find the best candidates and make a perfect match with your open roles. Even the best of us make mistakes from time to time, though. In fact, most recruiters will succumb to one of these mistakes eventually.shareasimage 9.44.44 AM

Avoid these mistakes to land better talent for your organization.

Here are four of the most common mistakes – read them now, and you’ll be in great shape to avoid them later!

  • Not taking time to craft excellent job descriptions. With all that’s on your plate, job descriptions can almost seem like an afterthought. But spending an extra few minutes to create a compelling job description that accurately conveys requirements and expectations for the job will save you significant time (and possibly headaches) down the road. Better job descriptions lead to more informed candidates. More informed candidates have better prepared resumes and cover letters, which make identifying top talent a bit easier. Plus, they’re more likely to come to job interviews better prepared with thoughtful questions.
  • Only searching for the “perfect” match. You may think you know exactly the perfect candidates for your job openings. The precise background, education and experience needed to thrive in your roles is perfectly laid out for you. But are these expectations really setting you up to find the best candidates for those roles? Or more importantly, for your company? Take a “big picture” look at candidates before painting a picture in your mind of how the perfect candidate should look. Speak to managers and team members to understand how employees will fit into the big picture, then be flexible while meeting with candidates. While you certainly want to adhere to requirements and expectations, taking a more open-minded approach could mean landing a future superstar within your organization.
  • Turning down overqualified candidates. We are living in an era where career transitions are more common than ever. Online education has made learning about new fields and areas of interest easier than ever, and bright professionals are taking advantage. But, eager professionals with impressive resumes can set off the “overqualified” warning to recruiters. Turn off that warning and be open to overqualified candidates – while you certainly want to conduct your due diligence to prevent being a “stepping stone” organization, you will likely gain a passionate, eager employee.
  • Not communicating. Whether it’s explaining things during a telephone screen or following up post-interview with next steps or decisions, communicating with candidates is critical to a successful recruiting career. Remember, candidates are also your customers. If you leave them hanging or fail to provide critical information to help them make decisions or continue through the hiring process, you are providing poor customer service. While you may not be interested in certain candidates, taking a few moments to communicate effectively ensures that – while they may not have gotten the job – you still value their application. Word of mouth is extremely important when it comes to considering new employers…you want to ensure word of mouth about your organization is positive! Plus, while a candidate might not be the right fit for this role, he or she may be a perfect fit for another role down the line. If you’ve failed to communicate effectively and have left a negative impression, do you think they’ll want to work for you later?

Finding great talent in today’s marketplace can be a challenge, but following these tips can help you considerably. Need more help? Helpmates has an extensive network of talented professionals across Southern California who are ready to jump in and make an immediate impact on your business. Contact us today to learn more.

Does Your Next Employer Have the Right Corporate Culture? Here’s How to Know.

Have you ever had great experiences during job interviews, only to get on board and feel like you were the victim of a bait and switch? Sometimes, it can feel like the “real” corporate culture of a company emerges only after you’ve accepted the job.shareasimage

The role of corporate culture in your career decisions

Just like you aim to put your best foot forward during job interviews, employers are trying to impress you throughout the hiring process. But when it comes to deciding which job offer you should take, understanding corporate culture at your potential new employer is a critical part of your decision. These four tips can help you more accurately gauge whether the corporate culture will be a fit for your needs:

  1. Do your homework. Before you even leave for the interview, you should have an idea what it’s like to work at your potential employer. First, be sure to talk to your recruiter – he or she has spent a significant amount of time talking to and meeting with employers and can give you some valuable insights. But also take advantage of your network. Scan your LinkedIn connections to see if you have a link to your potential employer. Talk to friends and relatives and ask them if they’ve had any experiences. Craft a few specific questions ahead of time to ensure you get the information and insights you need to make a thoughtful decision.
  2. Ask questions. Here at Helpmates, we recommend our candidates always ask questions during job interviews. Asking them can help demonstrate your interest in a company and role. They can also help position you as an informed professional. But there’s another benefit – they can help you determine whether the company culture is a fit for your needs and goals. “When is your workload at its peak?” shows insight and interest into the company workflow, but it can also help you gauge whether demands and expectations on time and effort exceed your comfort zone. Asking a question about the the frequency of employee meetings can also shed some light on the balance between solo work and teamwork expected, or into how much oversight you’ll get from your direct supervisor. One additional question that can help you gauge company culture centers around community involvement – if an employer is constantly sponsoring charity walks or other events and you’re passionate about giving back, there may be a fit.
  3. Be chatty. It might not seem like there is too much opportunity, but take advantage of “chit chat” moments to get some extra insight into what it’s like to work at each employer. For example, asking the receptionist where the best place is for lunch or a cup of coffee can help you determine whether the team’s habits are a fit for you. Do you prefer eating with your coworkers each day? Would you rather eat at your desk? If the team dynamic doesn’t fit with your personal preferences, the company culture might not be a fit for you.
  4. Take a look around. Some offices are like a second home, while others provide more professional, even sterile environments. Each has its perks for different people, and many organizations offer a balance between the two. Take a look around at your next job interview. If you like to surround yourself with mementos and family photos, but you notice that no one at a potential employer has done the same, the company might not be the best choice for you.

A complete understanding of the job and employer is essential to job satisfaction and a great career experience.  At Helpmates, we not only offer jobs with top employers across Southern California, we provide you with the background and information needed to make the right decision for your career. Search our available jobs or contact us to take the next step toward your career goals.

3 Critical Salary Negotiation Tips

Spring is often called the season of renewal. And with the spirit of spring, you might be thinking about the next step in your career (hint: We’re hiring!). As you think about where you’d like to take your career this spring, one important factor to consider is salary.

Don’t be nervous about salary negotiation.shareasimage
While there are many factors that can influence our job satisfaction and contribute toward reaching our career goals, compensation ranks highly for most professionals. These salary negotiation tips can help you land competitive compensation:

  • Rehearse the conversation multiple times. You’ve already gotten through the hard part by the time you’re ready for salary negotiation – congratulations! But you may feel indebted to the employer or nervous about discussing salary. The key to combat nerves is in rehearsing how the conversation might go. This can help you avoid language that may minimize your accomplishments or diminish your case for a higher salary (phrases like “only,” “just” or “think” can give that impression).
  • Consider presenting your desired salary in a range. Have a number in your head for the ideal salary you’d like to earn? Research shows you’re more likely to get it if you put it into a range. Here’s an example: Aiming for an annual salary of $45,000? Ask your employee for a salary “Between $45,000 and $50,000.” Choosing the right high and low anchors here are key – choose your desired salary as the lowest number, and be more ambitious at the high end, within reason (who knows – you might even get it!). Of course, each situation is unique – if your new employer appears to desire flexibility, a range could be perfect. But if you sense that the appearance of more preparation will serve you better, be armed with a specific number (say, $45,750). The key is to be perceptive and prepared.
  • Remember to look ahead. You’ve put in your time on research and have prepared a well thought out case for your new employer. But…you didn’t get the salary you expected. It’s important here not to be wounded – look ahead to the future. There could be several factors that determine the salary your employer is able to offer right now, but how you react here can make a major impact on whether you get a raise or promotion down the line. Keep the conversation open ended in this case – before you leave the meeting with your boss, be sure to ask something like, “I completely understand – can we revisit my compensation in six months?” Even better, ask the employer what you can do in the next six months to add additional value to your contributions. This small question will demonstrate your commitment to providing value and results for your employer. Plus, you’re taking ownership by setting up a measurable way to determine whether a salary increase is reasonable in the future.

Take your career to the next level this spring – Helpmates can help you reach your goals! Search our available jobs with top employers across Southern California, and submit your resume directly through our website.

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