How to Use EI When Interviewing

As a recruiter or hiring manager, interviewing job candidates is a critical part of your job. If you’re a hiring manager interviewing potential employees for work in your department, your department’s success – as well as your own – relies on you choosing the right individuals for your team. (Not that there’s any pressure, of course!)

If you’ve been interviewing/hiring for any amount of time, you’ve no doubt come across candidates who interview really well. They say all the right things. They come across as terrific team players who can work well on their own. They’re happy to pitch in and do tasks and projects that aren’t quite in their job description. They enjoy having lunch with colleagues but aren’t into gossip and drama.

And then you hire them and, well, they’re not quite who they made themselves out to be.

There’s a way to interview that helps you get a much better understanding of what a candidate is really like and how the candidate truly will interact/fit in with your team. It entails using your emotional intelligence (EI) when interviewing.

Orange County temp agency

Take a look below for tips and strategies on how to use your EI for best results when interviewing candidates.

  • Don’t move into the question/answer type of interview until you’ve done a bit of small talk. More than you might think necessary.

Many interviewers jump right into skills and “how would you do” type questions much too quickly. Instead, take your time to ask the candidate a bit about himself. Then segue into topics such as why he decided to apply for the position, what does he know about your organization, what are some of his career goals, even where he is now in his job-search.

Doing so helps you build trust and respect with the candidate. He sees that you’re interested in him beyond his job skills and these more personal interest types of questions can help him feel more at ease with you, allowing him to share more of his real reasons for applying, his future goals and aspirations and even some things he may not normally reveal in an interview (such as how he thinks his former boss was a piece of work).

  • Pay attention to a candidate’s body language.

Watch how the candidate reacts to your questions and his body language as he answers them. For example, if you asked a candidate how he dealt with a difficult boss and he says the two of them were able to work out their differences, does his body language indicate he still harbors negative feelings toward his boss; does he still seem unhappy with the individual?

  • Watch out for short answers that “sound” good.

“I am calm under pressure.” “I work well with everyone.” These are too vague and could be canned and/or rehearsed. Watch body language (as mentioned above) as you dig deeper. Ask for specific instances of when the candidate was calm in a pressure cooker and ask specifically what he means by “everyone.”

  • A big red flag is when a candidate criticizes co-workers and/or supervisors.

It’s especially troublesome if the candidate says the colleague/boss was a witch or know-it-all (and even more troubling if he uses much stronger language to describe the person).  A negative experience with a boss/colleague isn’t inherently a bad thing, but watch for how the candidate describes the individual, if he takes responsibility for his part in the negative experience and if he mentions what he’s learned as a result of the experience.

Do you have too many openings to fill and not enough time to interview or screen candidates? Helpmates can help! We can perform screening interviews for you following the criteria you set and then send the top candidates on to you for final interviews. We can also help you design EI questions that will help interviewers ascertain whether a candidate is a good fit for your organization.

Contact the Helpmates branch location nearest you to learn more.

Why Preparation is 80 Percent of Career Success

You’ve no doubt heard the saying that 80 percent of your accomplishments comes from 20 percent of your efforts. This is known as the Pareto Principle (which actually states that 80 percent of effects come from 20 percent of causes).

(You also may have noticed that 20 percent of your colleagues do 80 percent of the work, but that’s a topic for another blog post. Career tip: you want to be among that 20 percent!)

Yet when it comes to career success, it’s a bit flip-flopped: Your success is due to about 80 percent preparation and 20 percent work.

Let us explain:

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Let’s say you want to paint a room. You see yourself taking a paint roller to a large wall. But what comes before you grab a roller? Prep work! As in cleaning the wall (if necessary). Maybe even sanding it. Certainly putting painters’ tape along the edges to protect the trim and/or carpet. And don’t forget to place drop cloths on the floor, move the furniture away from the wall, and take off pictures, mirrors and light fixtures.

That’s a lot of work! And you haven’t even started putting paint on the walls yet!

But if you don’t prepare well you’ll discover paint drops on the carpet/floor, furniture, on the wall where you don’t want it, and so on. Your paint job will be something of a failure. All because you rushed into it and just wanted to “get ‘er done!”

Career success is the same: Rush around slapdash, trying this and that without doing the prep work and it’s a sure path to…mediocrity

Let’s say you need to give a presentation. It’s in front of your colleagues and supervisor. People you know well. So you don’t prepare and decide to wing it.

You didn’t practice, so you get nervous and mumble. A colleague asks a question and you give the answer you thought was correct only to have someone else correct you.

How impressed is your boss going to be? Do you think she’s going to ask you to lead an initiative any time soon? Will she trust that you know what you’re doing when you suggest a certain tactic?

You know the answer. And all could have been avoided if you took the time – yes, the tedious, two-afternoons-consuming time-in-addition-to-ALL-the-OTHER-things-you-need-to-do – to prepare for your presentation.

In other words, a successful project or task often results from work you do before tackling the task. Work that’s often a LOT of preparation, and it’s often 80 percent of all the time you’re going to spend on the task. Actually doing the task itself takes about 20 percent of your time.

So keep this in mind: 80 percent of any success you’ll have in your career will be taken up with preparation work. Often not “fun” work either. The “glory” and the fun makes up just 20 percent.

Ready for a new opportunity in the Los Angeles/Orange County region? Helpmates is hiring! Then check out our job board and see if one or more positions listed there appeals to you.

How to Keep Learning When You Have No Time for an Education

Your life is….busy! Really busy: you work 40-plus hours a week, you have a spouse who also works full-time, you have two school-aged children (or maybe their teens and so you want to keep a close eye on them). You want to eat right and exercise. You’d like some semblance of a social life.

Irvine careers

And yet you read all the time about how absolutely critical lifelong learning is to success in a career today. Snooze – as in don’t keep learning new skills – and you’ll lose, big time.

But, then again, you are BUSY! Where will you find the time?

Here are some ideas (and they don’t involve “watch less TV/Hulu dramas and just see your calendar open up!”).

  1. In fact, fire up the laptop and get thee to YouTube!

With 300 hours of video loaded up to YouTube every hour, you’re sure to find videos that will help you learn “good stuff” applicable for your career. From learning Excel to learning quantum physics, there’s a YouTube video on it. Yes, there will be no certification awarded, but then there are not tests, either.

  1. Get your training during work hours.

Hello, work-related conferences, seminars and training sessions! Many employers send employees to seminars and conferences. Others bring trainers to the work site. You can even watch a training video during specified hours at work. (No need to worry about watching a video on your own time at all!) And, because it’s employer-sponsored, these types of continuous learning opportunities often take place during your regular working hours.

In other words, sign up for any and all educational conferences and seminars your employer will allow!

  1. Take a course while driving to work or working out at the gym.

Purchase audio books and/or audio courses. Don’t forget podcasts and even such spots as Apple Music. You’ll be amazed at the things you can learn in this way

  1. Take an online course.

Many colleges offer academic credits/certification for courses taken online. Yes, you’ll probably have to dig and “find the time” out of your already full schedule to do so. But you can do so while at home.  Meaning your kids probably will be there so you can keep an eye on them, you won’t have to drive to campus and then home after (saving time) and you could potentially do them on weekends (again, being at home with your family).

You also can sign up for online classes at such websites as Udemy.com. (All Udemy courses provide a certificate of completion once you successfully finish a course.)

Now is a terrific time to look for a new career opportunity with Helpmates. Our clients are hungry for great people for their temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire job opportunities. Check out our current job openings and if one or more piques your interest, follow the instructions to apply!

Thinking of Becoming a Recruiter? Tips to Help You Thrive (and Survive)

If you’ve ever thought of becoming a recruiter – particularly in the staffing industry – you’ve picked a great time in the history of the industry to do so:

Staffing Industry Analysts projects that the staffing market will grow by three percent in 2018, with revenue projected at $145.1 billion.

What’s more, because not everyone is cut out for a career in staffing (you’ll either love or hate its extremely fast pace and the high demands placed upon you), many people leave the industry in two or three years.

Which means staffing firms – including Helpmates – are always looking for internal employees, even if they are not actively posting job opportunities.

We went into great detail about the many benefits of working as a recruiter in staffing in a previous blog post, so we won’t repeat ourselves here.LA recruiter career

Instead, here are some tips to help you thrive (and survive) as a staffing recruiter:

  • Understand that your primary duty is to your clients, not to candidates.

Many people enter the staffing industry because they want to help people find work. And that’s true: we do help people find work/careers and there’s little in this world that feels as good as knowing you helped someone vastly improve his life.

But your job is to fill your clients’ positions and unless a candidate has the skills and background that fit your client’s opportunities, you won’t be able to help him, no matter how much you’d like to. You can certainly tell your clients about this great individual, but – once again – if the client has no need for the candidate’s skills, he won’t get hired.

In other words: it’s not your job to find people work. (That’s their own job, actually.)

  • You’ll come into work planning on doing A first thing, but find that B, C and D, MUST be done first!

If there’s are two things both good and bad about working as a staffing recruiter, they are a) change is constant and b) no two days are alike.

The pros of this: you won’t ever, ever, EVER be bored! You’re constantly meeting new people, you’re helping clients and candidates create great partnerships, you’ll receive accolades from both clients (when you send terrific candidates) and candidates (when you send them on terrific assignments).

The cons of this: You can’t plan your day. We’re sure you’ve heard of putting together a list of priorities for work, correct? Well, as one staffing pro put it to us once, “The very few days I get one thing done on my must-do list I consider a great day!”

For example:

  • Temporary associates don’t show up for work and you need to find a replacement ASAP.
  • A client calls needing two administrative assistants for tomorrow.
  • You have five people to interview, today, too.
  • A candidate arrives at your office wanting to know why she didn’t get the position for which she interviewed (she called ahead to make an appointment), and so you owe it to her to give her your insights, but meanwhile an associate calls letting you know her child just got sick at work and she needs to leave your client’s office immediately.

You’re always putting out fires working in staffing. Many people love it; many do not.  It is stressful. And while you’ll get better at handling the stress, it really never goes away.

So how can you thrive as a staffing recruiter? We hinted a bit above at two:

  • Embrace the fact that your day constantly changes and that you’re never bored.
  • Revel in the fact that you’re helping both clients and candidates find great workers/jobs.

And here are some ideas to help you cope with the stress:

  • Even if it flies out the window the moment you enter the office, at the end of your day the day before, write down one or two things you want to get accomplished. You may find that you can and having that sense of control over your to-dos is empowering.
  • Make sure you take a lunch break. And take it away from the office. Get outside and eat your lunch in nature. Take a break and meet a friend at a favorite restaurant to catch up. The point is to be away from the office for a bit each day.
  • You might consider doing simple meditation on your lunch break, or before or after work.
  • Read about the staffing industry and attend conferences. Your boss probably will pay for conference attendance.
  • Consider becoming certified as a CSP (Certified Staffing Professional). Doing so definitely will help you in your career as it indicates your commitment to staffing and your expertise when it comes to working with both clients and candidates to ensure that you and they comply with all federal and state regulations. (We pay for certification for our internal employees.)
  • Exercise, eat healthfully, enjoy a hobby or two, and otherwise step away from even thinking about your job at least one day a week.

As mentioned above, we’re always looking for great candidates for our internal positions. You can check for internal opportunities on our job board, but even if you don’t see any, if you’re interested in working as a Helpmates recruiter or sales professional, we want to hear from you!

Why Bragging Can Be a Very Good Thing for Your Career

Many of us – especially the many of us that are women – are told that bragging is rude and self-centered. It’s. Not. Something.  Polite. People. Do.

But if you want to get ahead in your career, your business, even your personal life, “strategic” braggadocio can be a very good thing. Here’s why.

  • Told as a statement of fact (“I just landed a $500,000 per year client for my employer”), it makes you look confident and a problem solver/go-getter.

When you do something awesome, what’s wrong with telling others about it? Nothing! In fact, if you don’t tell your boss about the great things you’re doing for him/her, who will? And how will you get that promotion you’ve had your eye on if your supervisor(s) don’t know about your accomplishments? Answer: you won’t!Cerritos employment

Bosses are busy people and they have their own challenges and goals on which they are focused. Sure, they might congratulate you on a job well done. (In fact, they better be, by golly, or they’ll soon find that their employees will be leaving for more appreciative employers.)

It’s a good idea to keep a list of your accomplishments so that when you discuss your performance with your supervisor, you bring them up. In fact, consider sending your boss a list of your accomplishments quarterly, so that he/she is kept apprised of your value.

  • Speaking up helps showcase you as a leader.

Seriously, how many great leaders do you know who don’t, from time to time, remind others of what they’ve accomplished?

U.S. Presidents formally do it once a year in their State of the Union address; CEOs do so as well. So why can’t you?

Remember, stating accomplishments should be said as a point of fact, not in a bragging tone. Stating your achievements in this way showcases you as someone with self- confidence and leaders have self-confidence.

  • The fact that you’re not afraid to speak well of yourself when warranted can help others speak up about their own legitimate successes.

Isn’t the fact that society frowns on our “bragging,” really a way of making sure we don’t realize our full potential? If we were to discuss and celebrate our accomplishments and what’s going well in our lives – particularly  if we also mention some of the risks we took to make those accomplishments – wouldn’t that then encourage others to take some risks and reap the rewards?

We think so. So with that in mind, here’s a bit of statement-of-fact speaking for ourselves: Helpmates once again won two of the top awards available in the staffing industry, Inavero’s “Best of Staffing.” And this is our ninth year being honored in this way!

So, tell us here: what are accomplishment are you most proud of? And if it has to do with something you did at work, and if you’re interested in finding new work, take a look at our current opportunities and apply!

You Don’t Need a College Degree to Have a Great Career

Do you think that those with “careers” (those types of professional occupations with high salaries and the prestige that can go with them) are just for those with a college degree? This is so untrue, it’s laughable!

Take a look below for the reasons why you don’t need a college degree (not even a two-year associate’s degree) to have a great career, as well a few types you may want to consider.

College is expensive. By 2012 the cost of going to college had risen 12 fold from 1978 (and has continued to increase in the last six years) while the average hourly wage had increased by just under 400 percent between 1978 and 2012 and consumer prices increased a bit more than 400 percent in that time frame.Los Angeles careers

The average college student graduated in 2016 with $37,172 in student debt, a six percent increase from 2015. And that’s just the average! Stories such as the woman with $152,000 in student debt (includes a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees) aren’t uncommon, either.

In addition, not everyone wants to go to college or would be a good fit for college.

If that’s you, there are terrific alternatives to college, alternatives that pay well and can bring you and your family a terrific way of life.

Self-employment/Business Ownership

Some people with “just” a high school diploma start businesses. Perhaps they take their mowing and yard work skills (honed by working summers for a landscaping company in high school and then later working for a landscaping firm in their 20s) and start their own landscaping business. (Which eventually allowed them to retire early.) Perhaps they take the money their parents saved for college tuition and open a bakery*.

The point is that entrepreneurship can be the ticket to financial and career success. In fact, “can be” isn’t enough: entrepreneurship is the ticket to a fine future for many non-college grads. (There are a few things you do need, however.)

Sales

Sales professionals can make a terrific income: how does $150,000 a year sound? You don’t need anything beyond a high school diploma (and perhaps not even that). You do need to be able to approach and talk to people easily and, most importantly, listen to them closely. You also need the proverbial “thick skin,” as you’ll hear no far more than you’ll hear yes.

You also may want to take a few business/marketing classes and even sales trainings, -possibly through your employer (they often will pay for sales training).

Another great thing about working in sales: when companies need to lay people off, the sales folks usually are the last to go. After all, they are the ones that bring income to a company.

Real Estate

Sell homes and commercial buildings and you can make an extremely great living for yourself, so long as you work in the high end/luxury arm of the industry. Most full-time (working 60-plus hours a week) real estate agents made $87,000 (article written in 2014).

Yet it’s definitely possible to make $100,000-plus in a few years of persistent hustle. You will need to spend a few hundred dollars up front on certification and licensing, and you’ll also have to spend money on marketing your services before you ever see a commission check.

But so long as you continually study real estate, study your market, hone your people and sales skills, learn how to market yourself and properties like the extremely hard worker you are, there’s absolutely no need to worry about going to college.

Working in Staffing (Internal Staff Member)

While the staffing industry likes to see some post-secondary coursework in its recruiters and sales professionals, it’s not absolutely necessary.  Instead we prefer to see compassion, some talent in sales, an extremely high work ethic, the ability to juggle several job priorities at once, and the ability and desire to learn all there is to know about this exciting industry.

As you move up in management you may be encouraged to obtain a bachelor’s degree (at minimum), but it’s not necessary. For example, we know of at least one individual* who works for an international staffing firm as a vice president and she has had no formal college coursework at all! (She does have an exceptional natural business sense, however.)

Here’s an idea of the different salaries for staffing professionals in different staffing/recruiting companies and niches.

Helpmates is hiring internally! We’re always looking or terrific people who have an interest in helping our clients find great workers/candidates find great opportunities. If you’re at all interested in learning more about working in staffing with us, contact our corporate office and let us know why you think you’d be a great candidate.

*Personal friend.

Why EVERY Employee Needs Recognition

Do your employees feel recognized? As in seen by you? Thanked for their work on your behalf? Praised every now and then when warranted?

Probably not: a recent survey found that 74 percent of workers in North America plan to switch jobs this yearOrange County recruiters and 44 percent of them said their desire to leave was because of a lack of recognition and engagement at their current employer (that would be you).

So unless you want a good portion of your employees to leave for your competitors, here are three reasons why EVERY employee needs recognition.

  1. Humans need appreciation.

Notice we didn’t say “crave” or “like” or “want.” Nope. People need to be recognized for their good work because it confirms that our work – which in a way is our very being – is valued by others. Appreciating me means you value me and I absolutely need to feel valued.

If your employees feel you value their work, it benefits you: their productivity as well as satisfaction rises. This also leads them to want to maintain as well as improve on their good work. It’s a positive feedback loop that benefits everyone.

  1. If you’ve ever worked in a place that criticizes mostly and rarely praises, you know what crappy it was to toil.

Chances are all of us have worked for employers or supervisors at least once in our work lives that failed to praise and recognize. How did that make your feel? We bet you did only that which needed to be done, and the bare minimum of that, to boot. (You also probably kept your eye on the job boards regularly.)

Praising/recognizing your workers is essential when it comes to creating an exceptional workplace. Your employees want to be valued for their contributions and if they are not, morale sinks. And faster than you may think.

  1. Praise your team as a whole, of course, but don’t forget to praise workers individually.

It’s important to praise your team for work well done, as a team. But even if you know for a fact that some people worked and accomplished more than others, it’s still important to praise everyone individually for the good work.

Find something, no matter how small, to praise a worker for. You don’t need to do so publically. A handwritten thank you note mentioning the instance you noticed the worker do something special should be enough.

Noticing people individually shows you see them. Humans are social creatures and we all like to be part of an appreciated group, but it’s important for our individual psyches that others notice us. As in notice me. Just me.

Ignore individual employees and they could become disillusioned and may end up fueling a negative work environment, one that contributes to low morale, lower productivity and high turnover.

Turnover and attrition occurs even in the best companies. If you need great people for direct-hire, temporary and temp-to-hire opportunities at your LA- or Orange County-area business, contact us here at Helpmates. Contact our location nearest you.

Be a More “Visible” Recruiter, Attract More Candidates

Many job seekers don’t know how to find – let alone contact – recruiters, especially if they’re interested in looking for a new position while still working for their current employer. (Hello, lovely passive candidate!).

In today’s hard-to-find-great-candidates environment, it’s far, far, FAR better to be visible. Easy to find and talk to. And this goes for online as well as in real life.

Orange County staffing firm

Let’s discuss how recruiters and human resources pros can make themselves more visible to potential candidates and reap the ensuing rewards.

  • If you recruit locally, get out of the office!

What are you doing sitting at your desk!? Yes, we know you have many requisitions coming in, but if you’re going to get them out, get out! Go to chamber events. Talk at college campuses. Join your PTA. Join United Way and volunteer. Sure, we know you probably belong to SHRM, but how often do HR pros send you great candidates?

Instead, get out of the office and talk up what you do. Mention some current openings. Ask any and all people you meet if they might know of someone for a position.

  • Put your contact info on job postings.

That’s right: your name, email and phone number. Expect emails and phone numbers – and resumes. Welcome emails and phone calls. Answer the phone when it rings; reply to email questions from potential candidates.

  • Publish a post on a topic of interest to your target candidates and publish it on LinkedIn Pulse.

Pulse posts can be a great way to showcase you expertise as a recruiter to potential candidates. Once it’s published to your profile, share it. Join relevant LinkedIn groups and share a link there. If someone comments on it, make sure to reply. Place a link to it on your personal Twitter and Facebook channels.

End the post with a specific call to action (known as a CTA to marketers). If you’ve written a post that discusses how to find a job in your industry, consider saying something like “To learn more about opportunities in this field, email me at….” And so on.

If you’re a hiring manager or recruiter at an Orange County or Los Angeles-area business and need help finding great talent, contact the recruiters at Helpmates. We specialize in finding workers for temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities in administrative work, healthcare, financial services, warehouse/distribution, and – yes! – human resources! Contact the office nearest you and craft a recruiting strategy to help you.

How to Change Careers (Successfully)

Whether it’s due to dissatisfaction with your current career or possibly getting laid off from a job in a dying business sector, chances are great that you’re going to want to change careers (or may at least seriously contemplate doing so) at least one in your professional lifetime.

Many people do change careers. You hear often about people such as the person who left a career as a data analyst to that of freelance writer. Or the lawyer who left the profession to become an intern at a local television news station and who now covers the Supreme Court as a correspondent. Or how about this doozy of a change: going from a TV station control room to school bus driver and wedding officiant (both of which he LOVES)!

Irvine careers

But there also are many other people who change careers who find that the new career a) isn’t what they thought it would be or b) they struggle mightily to become successful within that career and/or make ends meet. We don’t hear as much about these people, but they’re out there, rueing the day they made the change.

And why do they regret the change? There usually are at least one – or more – of the following six reasons:

  1. They didn’t take the time to really think about what they wanted to do.
  2. They didn’t research the new career and went in blind.
  3. They quit their current job before researching the career and/or even having another job lined up.
  4. They didn’t get any training needed before quitting their current position and looking for a new job in a new field.
  5. They assumed they could get a job in the new career at the same level – and amount of salary — they had in in their old career (“Operations manager in retail to director in a marketing agency, here I come!”)
  6. Deciding to change careers because they hate their current boss/colleagues/company. (They forgot that a single job is not a career.)

Instead, here’s what successful career changers do.

  • They research and research – and research some more – the career(s) in which they are interested.

We may think that we know what it’s like working in a certain career, but that’s pretty much impossible unless we actually work in the career or at least talk to several people who work within it.

Since it would be very difficult to work in the field before, well, working in the field, your best bet is to talk to as many people as possible who do what you want to do. Ask them about the best and worst things about the career. Ask them how they got into the career. Ask them about salaries, skills and education requirements, etc. Ask them if they know of anyone else in the field you could talk to.

Doing this not only helps you get a better idea of what the career actual entails day-to-day, it also helps you build a network of people who can help you find work if/when you decide to make a move.

  • They work hard to see how their current skills can transfer easily to the new career and they showcase this to potential employers.

Chances are great that unless you have the skills that transfer easily from one career to another (sales skills, for example), you may have to start a bit “from the bottom.”

Not always, but usually. And the people who do start at a level somewhat akin to their current position in their current career work hard to either gain the skills needed  for the new career or show potential employers how they transfer.

They realize that it’s not their new manager’s job to make their career dreams come true: they need to show value and how they can solve the new supervisor’s problems from the get go.

If they don’t have the skills that transfer easily, they graciously come to terms with it and accept that they may have to climb the ladder all over again.

Possibly the easiest career change to make is to one that’s related to a current career: advertising to marketing, law to finance, medicine to public health, for example. That doesn’t mean a change from interior design to finance (for example) isn’t unheard of, but anyone making such a drastic change needs to make it with eyes wide open.

Are you looking for a change? Helpmates may be able to help you, so long as you understand the limits of your current skills in regards to what the jobs in a new career require. Whether you’re looking for a new job or a whole new profession, take a look at our current opportunities and, if one or more pique your interest, follow the instructions on the posting.

Growing Young Talent into Great Leaders

You spent a lot of effort and funds to hire your younger team members, some of whom are actually phenomenal people and terrific at what they do for your company.

And, yet….you lose them. Forty-two percent of young people (who are mostly millennials today, but Generation Z is coming!) tend to stay at a job just one to three years.

It cost you several thousand dollars to hire the person and, because the worker left, you’ll now have to incur those costs again. But what if you could keep those young, talented people on your payroll? The benefits would be substantial:

  • You wouldn’t have the cost of replacing them.
  • You wouldn’t need to train their replacements.
  • You’d have the benefit of the knowledge they’ve accumulated in their time with you (compared to new hires, who wouldn’t have that accumulated knowledge).
  • And so on.

Orange County temp agency

What do young people want? What could entice them to say with you for more than three years? Raises and the chance for advancement!

It’s a no-brainer really: take your best young talent and groom them to become your company’s future leaders. Home grown CEOs, if you will.

But how do you actually do this? Read below.

Offer special training opportunities.

In fact, it may be a good idea to provide leadership/management training courses/webinars/seminars/programs for those employees who show potential (and interest). After all, what 27-year-old knows how to exude an aura of “I’m in charge” with the proper tone to address subordinates (who may be older than he/she), showcase appropriate body language and know the right way to react/punish when a team member exhibits unacceptable behavior?

Offer the chance to role play.

Make sure you your leaders-in-training have a chance to try out these new behaviors in a critical, but supportive, arena (as in critiques, not criticism).

Understand that many young people have a lot of self-confidence, but it’s the type that hasn’t been “tried by fire.” That is, your top young employees may have a strong can-do attitude, but the fact remains that they don’t have the skills needed to manage or lead.

Start providing increased responsibilities.

Allow your budding leaders the chance to exercise their new management skills in real life. Do so gradually and make sure they have someone in management (a mentor) to whom they report. Watch how they handle their additional responsibilities. Provide them greater obligations as they show the ability to handle them.

Depending on the new challenge, don’t shirk giving the person a promotion and/or an increase in salary.

Give feedback, and not just from other managers.

The trainee’s mentor/manager should review and give the person feedback, but so should others, particularly those who also have worked with you for about the same amount of time but who weren’t chosen for leadership training.  Encourage open and truthful feedback without fear of reprisal.

Looking for more great talent for your Orange County or Los Angeles-area company? Then contact Helpmates! We can help you find new grads, middle-managers and members of the C-suite for temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities. Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you.

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