Simplifying Your Recruiting Process

In our opinion, good recruiting boils down to two things: great (clear) job descriptions and a strong and large community in which to network.

In other words, when a recruiter understands the needs of a job completely and has a lively network of professional relationships to help her find great-fit candidates, extending an offer should happen quickly.

orange county staffing

Really. It’s not complicated; all of us (recruiters, hiring managers, HR professionals, etc.) have just made it so.

A Simple Recruiting Process

We live in the real world with you and as much as we all would love recruiting to be as easy as described above, we know that’s not possible. Still, just because it’s not possible doesn’t mean it can be made easier, simpler.

Take a look below at what we believe is a roadmap to simplifying your recruitment efforts.

  1. It all starts with the job description.

If the job description is fuzzy, incomplete, etc., your search for a great candidate is already in danger. You can’t find what you need if you’re not clear what that need is.  And “I’ll know it when I see it” is a recipe for convoluted, drawn-out process, possibly resulting in hiring someone who really isn’t a good fit.

Instead, a clear, comprehensive job description helps keep recruiters and hiring managers focused, and when one has clarity and focus, recruiting magic happens!

  1. Help applicants help you: make it easy to apply.

Don’t ask applicants to fill out a long application online (they can fill it out at length if the come in for an interview or after hired). Consider allowing them to simply send you their LinkedIn profile as a sort of preliminary application.

Finally, not every great employee looks great on paper or has access to a computer: don’t force people to apply online. If they prefer to bring their resume and cover letter – or to even fill out a paper application in your office – let them!

  1. Keep that interview process humming!

For the love of everything you find precious, don’t bog down the interview process! In this candidate-driven market, your applicants are busy people (busy interviewing at your competitors)! Require that they go through too many interviews before extending an offer and you’ll lose them. How many interviews is enough? One or two, tops: a preliminary screening chat and the interview with the hiring manager.

  1. Be available and communicate with your candidates.

If they have more questions after the interview, answer the phone and talk to them (or e-mail them a response to their query). Tell them upfront what your hiring timeline is and make every effort to meet your self-imposed decision deadline. (Make your decision no more than a few days after interviewing/checking references.) Let candidates know if you’re not interested in them as soon as you know so. Thank them for interviewing, sincerely wish them well and tell them a little bit as to what they were lacking: “We needed five years’ experience and the person we chose had eight.”

  1. Ask for help.

You hire employees to scale your business and get more done more quickly, so why not scale your recruiting process with the help of staffing professionals? Having a staffing firm do the preliminary leg work (source, vet, first interview, etc.) can save a considerable amount of time, allowing you to concentrate on your own work, spending time interviewing and hiring only after the top candidates have been identified.

Helpmates has been helping Los Angeles and Orange County employers find great talent for 45 years: we know where the good guys are! Contact us to learn more about our recruiting services.

To Fight Unemployment Claims – or Not

As an owner (or HR manager) of a small – or even large – Los Angeles or Orange County business, one of your main focuses probably is on keeping unemployment claims down. After all, you don’t want to have to pay an unemployment claim if it’s fraudulent:

  • The more unemployment claims you pay, the higher your unemployment tax rate. (Your rate depends on how many ex-employees collect unemployment after leaving your company.)
  • However, paying the claim –even if it’s “iffy” — could mean your company steers clear of a discrimination or wrongful discharge lawsuit, therefore saving time and money dealing with the suit. What’s more, paying unemployment also could raise your chances of winning a discrimination/wrongful discharge suit.

Los Angeles employer of record

So it’s a sticky wicket: pay every claim in order in order to possibly avoid a lawsuit but risk the chance you potentially increase your unemployment taxes considerably.

There are some very good reasons not to contest any claim. Here are two:

  • Let someone go – for whatever reason – and he likely is to be very angry. If you fired him, there was a good reason you didn’t want him around anymore. Do you really want to spend time – and lots of money – dealing with him again? Probably not.
  • What’s more, as Talent Management and HR (EREMedia.com) put it recently, “it’s your fault if someone is fired,” because there almost always are indications that a candidate will be trouble. So if you hired the individual anyway, you need to take some responsibility for it.

Does this just stick in your craw? After all, not contesting an unemployment claim when someone was fired for legitimate misconduct!? What planet are we living on!?

And we understand. Truly. Too many people file fraudulent unemployment claims as it is, so to not contest it feels as if we’re condoning such behavior!

When should you contest an unemployment claim?

When you fired an employee for legitimate misconduct and you have solid documentation. After all, no one filing an illegitimate claim is going to admit to doing so. So you need solid proof, which includes documentation and or witnesses (and remember to create the documentation before you fire the employee).

Let us take on the burden of unemployment insurance.

Helpmates can become your workers’ employer of record (EOR), thus becoming your now-employees’ legal employer. We therefore take on all related employer responsibilities, including unemployment insurance claims. We would handle – and pay for – all unemployment insurance claims. In other words, if we feel a claim is fraudulent, we make the decision whether to contest it and reap – for good or bad – all the consequences of the ruling.

For more information on our EOR services, contact the Helpmates office nearest you and ask to speak to the branch manager.

You’re Working Hard, Yet You Haven’t Been Promoted. What to Do

You’ve worked at your employer for at least a year, possibly even two or three. You’ve worked hard, have always come in on time (if not even early) and never left until after everyone else had gone home.  You did more than was expected of you and were often complimented on the great work you did. Your boss also has given you an atta boy/atta girl several times over the last few months.

Yet as much as you want a promotion, as much as you absolutely deserve a promotion, you’ve watched as others received them, but not you.

jobs in Los Angeles

What gives? We’ve listed several possibilities below.

  1. You never actually asked for a promotion.

That’s right: you need to ask.

Should your boss notice your great work and accomplishments? Sure! But will she? Maybe, but maybe not. After all, she has her own concerns and more than likely is focused mostly on making sure she does her own job well. She needs to be sure she’s keeping her own boss happy (and securing her own promotions). And even if she does notice the great job you’re doing – and certainly appreciates it – she  may have thought that if you wanted a promotion, you would have asked for it.

Scenarios where the boss surprises you with a promotion and a fat raise? Those usually happen only in the movies. You need to ask to get.

  1. Your boss doesn’t think you’re ready.

Your supervisor did notice all your hard work and accomplishments, but when you bring the subject up, your boss tells you she thinks that while you’re on the path to promotion, she doesn’t think you’re quite ready.

Why might she think it’s not your time yet?

  • Your boss may feel you’re not enough of a team player. This trait is important if you want a promotion that moves you up to management.
  • Your supervisor feels that you don’t handle stressful situations well or that you’re too much of a people pleaser, and wants you to “mature” a bit more.
  • And so on.
  1. You didn’t show your boss the value of a promotion.

Just because you work hard and go the extra mile in your current position in no way qualifies you for a promotion. A promotion always entails more responsibility, more “skin in the game,” so to speak. So what has all that effort provided your boss, in addition to simple hard work?

Did you bring in more clients? Did save the company more money? Did you make the department more efficient? In other words, what tangible results did your work produce?

  1. There’s no benefit to your boss.

Yes, this appears selfish on her part, but in order to get a promotion, your boss needs to get something out of it. It must be something that benefits her, personally. For example, by promoting you, does a particular goal or project she wants completed get completed because of your particular skills?

If you’ve been working hard, providing terrific and provable value to your employer and have asked for a promotion to no avail, it may be time to move on. Helpmates can help. Take a look at our current job opportunities. Yes, many of our openings are temporary, but many are regular, full-time career positions.  Plus, temporary positions often can advance your career.

Contact the Helpmates office nearest you today to apply.

When You Haven’t Had a Job Interview in 6 Months, Do This

Let’s say you’ve been unemployed for a while. A long while, at least six months. You were laid off from your Orange County company and were able to score a nice severance package and so you decided to “take it easy” for a few weeks, catch your breath, rest up, relax, maybe take in some of the Southern California day trips you’d been wanting to take, but never had the time.

And then a few weeks turned into six, then into two months and you woke up one  morning and said to yourself: “Todays’ the day! I’m revamping the resume, taking a look at some job boards, maybe make a few calls.”

And you do start with gusto. But 45 minutes in to the resume redo, you decide to check Facebook. Then it’s on to the Fox News or CNN websites. Before you know it, it’s 11:30: can’t make any calls now; it’s time for lunch.

As you eat lunch at your desk, you browse your favorite sites. You look up again and it’s 2 p.m. How did THAT happen!? So you work for another 45 minutes and then take a break.

Break over, but it’s now 4:45. Contacts won’t be at their desks. You call it a day.

The Same Pattern, Day After Day

Three months in and you’ve revamped the cover letter, but you’re starting to get worried: that severance package won’t last forever.

So you make some calls and people are polite but you can her them yawning on the other end. They’ll let you know if they hear of anything.

You start applying to openings you see on the job boards. You carefully craft each cover letter to the position and tweak your resume for that particular opening, too.

Still, that sound you hear? Crickets.

Six months is coming in mere days and you’ve no prospects and you’ve gone on no job interviews and you’ve definitely received no job offers.

Panic is now your middle name.

Time to REALLY Get to Work!

Even if you’ve been diligently applying for jobs, networking, and so on but have no job offers or even interviews, well, we’ll be blunt here: it’s going to be a lot harder for you to get interviews/job offers. Not impossible; but definitely harder. In a way, employers will look at you as if you’ve been out of work for five years: “What’s wrong with you that you’re still unemployed?”

(Note to self: never again “take it easy for a few days” after being laid off. Start the job search within no more than a week after leaving your employer.)

Enough with the Bad News. Here’s What you MUST Do: You’re Going to Break Some Rules

  • You’re going to approach companies directly (No more applying on job boards. You are DONE.) You’re going to find out who can hire for the type of work you can do and you’re going to contact that person directly.
  • Once you get a name, you’re going to research the hiring manager. LinkedIn, Google, the company’s website. You’re also going to research the company’s website to see what its goals and challenges are and you’re going to Google the heck out of, finding everything you can about the company.
  • Once you’ve done your research and you know the hiring manager’s name, you’re going to write her a letter. But not any old letter. Nope. Definitely not. Instead, you’re going to write a letter about a problem you figure the hiring manager has and how you can solve it for her. You could call this a “pain” letter if you like (go ahead, that’s what she calls it).
  • People hire people to solve their problems and you’re going to state how your skills and experience can help a hiring manager solve that problem. And you’re going to ask for a meeting or phone call to discuss your capabilities in person (instructions on how to do this).
  • Next you’ll place that letter (don’t fold it) with your resume in an 8.5 x 11-inch manila envelope and address it to the hiring manager.
  • And you’ll do this again for several different hiring managers at different companies.

Results can happen pretty quickly once the letters go out. This takes considerable work upfront (finding names, research, crafting the letter, etc.) but hiring managers will contact you. After all, you’ve just shown them evidence that you can solve their problems! Not all of them, of course, but enough will and you’ll soon be headed out on interviews.

Whether you’re looking for a full-time position or some temporary assignments while you look for your next opportunity, Helpmates can help. We have dozens of job openings every day: take a look and if one or more look interesting, apply as instructed.

Why Social Talent Sourcing May Not Work

Social media is teeming with people, millions and billions of people: Twitter boasts of 100 million users per day. Facebook was heading toward 2 billion users worldwide in February. LinkedIn, meanwhile, now has half a billion users.

And many of them could well be interested in a new job or career opportunity.

orange county recruiters

So recruiters have flocked to social sites in droves. And who can blame them: all those millions of people in the U.S. in one place, available to contact with an easy click on the Enter key after writing a short message.

Yet, 80 percent of recruiters report that they’ve had zero luck in actually hiring someone they sourced on Facebook and Twitter. Nada. None. Big fat goose egg. Zilch.

How is this possible? So. Many. People.

And that’s the problem: the author of the post linked to above believes that recruiters tend to look at the social sites as quasi candidate databases because there are just so many potential candidates on them.

Yet the sites weren’t created with recruiting in mind, so it’s quite difficult to find qualified candidates. After all, look for people who are business managers and good luck finding them with that keyword on Twitter (the social platform doesn’t sort profiles by job title). As for Facebook, most people don’t put career information on their profiles at all.

Many people have written on how to source talent on social media. (For example, take a look at this terrific piece on sourcing and recruiting on Twitter). Take a look below for our advice.

Sourcing on Twitter

To source on Twitter, you need to be active on it: you should be participating in its community regularly. Make sure you have a photo of yourself (rather than the “egg”) by your Twitter handle. Tweet about more than jobs and recruiting issues. Stay away from just tweeting job postings.

Work hard to get followers: it helps build your credibility. This will mean tweeting possibly five times a day (job postings don’t count). You can use Hootsuite to schedule your posts, but will need to scan through your followers’ tweets and re-tweet, comment and like them.

Facebook Sourcing Tips

You may want to use a free sourcing tool created specifically for Facebook, Social Talent.

Successful Facebook recruiters join the Facebook Groups where their typical prospects hang out. Comment when you feel you have something worthwhile to say; answer questions that provide true help. Don’t recruit; you’ll be seen as pushy and sales-y.

Go ahead and reach out to people you feel might make a good candidate for an open position: Facebook is public. It’s also a business. It’s OK to treat it like one – carefully so, however.

The most important thing when it comes to sourcing on social media is sincerity. Be genuine. Be enthusiastic – this opportunity could a life changer for someone and her family!

Speaking of sourcing: we know where the good guys are! If you need help finding and vetting potential candidates for your company’s job opportunities, contact the Helpmates’ office nearest you. We would love to hear how we can help: contact us today.

Do the Job to Get the Job

We can’t take credit for that headline: it comes from the great Nick Corcodilos of AskTheHeadhunter.com who is a firm believer that candidates have much more power than they believe and that the absolute best way to find work is to directly approach a hiring manager. (Go ahead, visit his site and read as much of it as you can; you won’t be disappointed.)

Orange County careers

More importantly, once a candidate has piqued the interest of said hiring manager, it’s up to the candidate to, as Corcodilos puts it, “do the job to get the job.”

Here’s what he means, and it’s downright brilliant:

When candidates are pretty much equal in background, skills, education and ability to perform the duties of the job well, who tends to get the job? The one who shows the most enthusiasm for it.

Enthusiasm is important, but a critical part of that enthusiasm is understanding that one must work to prove one is the best candidate for the job.

In other words, the candidate that is so enthusiastic for the job that she’s willing to show the hiring manager that she’s up to job by actually “behave[ing] like an employee” instead of candidate, often is the one who receives a job offer.

This Doesn’t Mean Working for Free

Far, far from it. What it means, according to Corcodilos, is showing a hiring manager how you actually will do the job and how hiring you will help an employer become or stay profitable. (Remember: the main reason companies hire people is to solve problems and all employers’ problem boil down to one thing: making or saving money (and saving money is pretty much the same as making money).

Here’s a real-life example of this:

A reporter – one without a college degree – decided to apply for a job with a national PR firm. The job description said a college degree was required.

Still, because of her background and writing skills (she sent samples), the hiring manager called her in for an interview. The interview went well and the hiring manager gave her an assignment (as he did all interviewees): she could choose one topic out of three offered and write a pro and con piece on each. She needed to get her samples back to the hiring manager within a week.

The interview was on Monday. The young woman wrote the pro and con pieces on all three topics (six pieces total instead of two) and delivered them to the hiring manager on Wednesday (rather than the next Monday).

She got the job. Without the required college degree.

The “Do the Job” Interview

When going to an interview, be prepared to show your stuff! Corcodilos suggests that you tell the hiring manager beforehand that you want to demonstrate how you will do the work she hires you to do.

At the interview ask the hiring manager to present you with a real problem, one she’s actually facing, and show her how you’d solve it. This can do nothing less than impress the manager big time! (Don’t worry that you will get something “wrong,” because you won’t know all the facts about the problem; just solve the problem as best you can with the facts you have. Ask questions if needed).

Before leaving, look the manager straight in the eye as you’re shaking hands goodbye and tell her that you know you can do the job well and that you want it.  (If you end up turning the job down later, that’s ok. You may learn it’s not what you really want. The idea is to get the job offer.)

Not Easy, but Effective!

This strategy is not easy. It takes guts. A good amount of self-confidence and assertiveness. It may not be possible to speak to or e-mail the hiring manager before the interview to let her know you want to demonstrate your value in this way.

Yet even if you can’t tell the hiring manager beforehand, you can certainly announce it at the interview itself. Study the company as thoroughly as possible so that you can know its goals, challenges and successes as much as possible. (If you land an interview via a recruiting or staffing service, ask your recruiter for as much information as possible about the company.) Know your strengths and how they can translate to providing value to the hiring manager and do not be shy about demonstrating that value.

Go do the job and GET THE JOB!

For help in finding great openings in Orange and Los Angeles, counties, contact the Helpmates’ office nearest you. Or search our job opportunities and if one piques your interest, follow the instructions to apply.

Streamlining the Recruiting Process: Hire Fast, Hire Well

If you’ve noticed that you’re losing some great candidates because you’re taking too long to hire, you’re not alone: in this candidate-driven market, where there are just 1.5 applicants for each opening, a slow hiring process can mean you’re losing out on top performers, because someone else has already snatched them up. (Many top prospects are hired within just 10 days of dipping their toe in job search waters.)

Los Angeles temp service

We understand that sharing the misery of missing out on the best candidates in no way alleviates the pain of losing those prospects. So we have some strategies for you. Take a look below.

  1. Make sure the job’s description is well defined.

That is, know exactly what the job entails and make sure you define it clearly. Absolutely clearly. Knowing precisely what type of background, certifications, education, and skill sets required from the get-go helps you make better – and faster – decisions when it comes to comparing qualified candidates with varying degrees of what you need.

  1. Use an applicant tracking system to shortlist candidates.

An ATS uses keywords to filter through candidates and pass over those who don’t fit your requirements. This can make the sourcing process much faster compared to having an individual spend hours going through resumes received. This also can help ensure great candidates aren’t lost due to simple human exhaustion.

  1. Consider allowing a candidate to send you a link to her LinkedIn profile first.

Doing so can save you some time in the preliminary vetting process, especially so since not all great candidates (think passive candidates) have an updated resume on hand. Looking at a prospect’s LinkedIn profile can allow you to see if he or she has the qualifications you need. You can always ask to see a resume later.

  1. Embrace the video interview….live and pre-recorded.

Many companies already use live video interviews/conferencing for preliminary interviews. Others are starting to drill down even further for preliminary vetting by sending candidates a set of questions and asking them to send them a video recording of their answers. This does benefit candidates: it allows them to think carefully about their answers and they can record their answers at a time convenient for them.

  1. Rate prospects against the job, not other candidates.

We must admit, we really like this one: instead of comparing candidates to each other, compare them to the position. That is, because you have clearly defined the role (see number 1, above), you should be able to see how each candidate would or would not fit it. This allows you to choose the candidate best suited for the role, not the best candidate among the candidates.

  1. Use a recruiting or staffing service to vet prospects.

Of course we are going to suggest using a staffing service such as Helpmates to help you get through the sourcing and vetting process! Doing so can free you up to interview only the top candidates for the position. Together we can craft a clearly defined job description and then source and vet candidates, sending only the best on to you for interviews.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

How to Get the Most Out of Your Recruiter

We’re recruiters and we love it! For all its many ups and downs, it’s a career that helps candidates find work and our clients find great employees. Our hearts just go zing! when we help someone find a new position. After all, without work, we can’t support our families, we can’t realize our dreams, we can’t help our children become all they can be.

Los Angeles recruiters

So we fully understand that “a job” really is more than that: work can give us meaning and provide us the opportunity to work at something greater than ourselves. It also can provide community as well as income.

So in a very important way, jobs are our lives in the sense that without work, we can’t truly live. And that’s why we think working as a recruiter is one of the greatest careers out there because our work has a massive impact on individual lives.

(In fact, the American Staffing Association [the trade association of the staffing industry; Helpmates is a member], has a whole section on the benefits of recruiting/staffing as a career: Staffing as a Career – A Whole Opportunity Awaits. If you’ve ever wanted to sit on our side of the desk, we hope you check it out.)

Not All Bright Lights and Glamor

Still, working as a recruiter in the staffing industry is intense. Our days are extremely busy day. As in incredibly, astonishingly, exceedingly, unbelievably, absurdly busy.  On any given day we could:

  • Need to find 20 people to head to work at a distribution center. Tomorrow. Oh, and the client called us about it at 4 p.m.
  • Need to fill 10 administrative assignments this week. We only have eight great admin professionals available, so we need to interview several more so that we can fill our clients’ needs.
  • Three temporary associates called in sick at the last minute, and we need to replace them ASAP.
  • We have two great accounting professionals coming in for an interview with us before we send them out on a terrific permanent job interview.

And that’s all while fielding lots of phone calls and dozens upon dozens of e-mails from our clients and candidates.

What to Look for in a Recruiter/Staffing Service

Looking for work is stressful enough; don’t make it harder by working with a service that makes your job search more nerve-wracking than it need be.

When looking at different staffing firms, look for:

  • A firm in which most of its recruiters are Certified Staffing Professionals (CSPs). CSPs are certified by the ASA and the designation shows that the recruiter has the expertise and commitment to adhere to the highest standards of professionalism. The exam is comprehensive and takes considerable study before a recruiter can pass. It’s a true mark of distinction and all of our recruiters here at Helpmates are required to take the exam and pass it!
  • A commitment to treating all candidates with the utmost respect and understanding. This actually can be rated. Inavero’s Best of Staffing surveys asks both staffing service clients and candidates to rate their staffing service and then Inavero tallies results and provides its Best of Staffing award in the two categories. Only two percent of staffing firms in the U.S. and Canada win these awards and Helpmates has been placed on the “Best of Staffing” list for eight straight years. Winning the candidate (called “talent” by Inavero) satisfaction award is a sign that our candidates feel we treat them with the respect and consideration they are due.
  • Look for a service with recruiters who have stayed with the company for at least three years. The staffing and human resources industries are well known for their internal employee turnover rates. So when you find a service with recruiters with several years’ tenure, you’ve found a firm that treats its internal employees right – a very good sign for you! Here at Helpmates, our average recruiter tenure is 5.1 years and our turnover is less than half of the staffing industry’s rate.

How to Get the Best Out of Us

If you’re looking for work and contact one of our offices, we want to make sure you have the best experience possible, so we want you to know this:

We truly want to help you find work. Really. Honest. Truth!

But we do have constraints and the biggest one is this: our primary job isn’t to find people work; it’s to find our clients the best workers.

Remember, our work on your behalf costs you nothing. If our main purpose was to find you work, we’d have to charge you for it. We need to make a profit: Helpmates is a business, after all.

So our clients pay for our work and therefore our top priority is to find them the best candidate for a position. Yet right up there with that priority (as in, thisclose) is finding you work.

However, unless you have the skills and background our clients need, we won’t be able to place you. You could be the nicest, the hardest working, the most devoted person in the world, but if you don’t have the skills or experience our clients need, we may not be able to find a position for you.

However, that doesn’t mean we can’t help you.

What does that mean? If you have flexibility and are willing to take positions for which you may be overqualified; if you understand our client-stipulated constraints; if you understand that even temporary assignments are real work, should be treated as such (yes, put your time with us on your resume) and can lead to more permanent work; if you’re open to learning new skills (such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.) on your own time, without pay (we provide the software so that you may do this at home); we will work very hard to help you.

After all, if you do the above, you’re showing initiative and you’re showing a great work ethic. In other words, to paraphrase Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire, you’re helping us help you and so don’t be surprised if we go out of our way to help you as much as we can!

In the meantime, take a look at our current temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities at some of Orange and Los Angeles counties’ best employers. If one appeals to you, follow the instructions on the listing or contact us! We look forward to helping you find a great position.

Using Snapchat in Your Recruiting Efforts: Why and How

Have you heard the buzz about Snapchat and recruiting? With 158 million people using Snapchat every day, it’s no wonder the social platform has enticed recruiters.

In a nutshell, Snapchat allows users to record videos, take photos, add then text and graphics to a message and then send it to a specific list of recipients.

Los Angeles staffing

The feature that has made Snapchat so popular with Millennials and Generation Z is because each of those messages (known as Snaps) have a set time limit, from about 1 to 10 seconds, depending on the length the Snap’s creator chooses. If a recipient opens a Snap in the Snapchat app on a smartphone, the message disappears after the allotted time, whether the recipient looks at it or not. The platform therefore has a huge “Look at me NOW or miss out!” vibe. (A recipient can open a Snap and save it for later, but the recipient needs to save it quickly.)

While you may think that you don’t want to recruit teens (Generation Z), understand that as the social channel grows, user age also is growing: about 50 percent of Snapchat users are older than 25 and the number of 35-year-olds and older is growing, as well. (More Android users have downloaded the Snapchat than the Twitter app!)

Using the Power of a Disappearing Image/Video to Your Recruiting Advantage

So how can you incorporate Snapchat into your recruiting strategies? Take a look below.

  1. If not already using the app, download it and create an account.

Take a profile picture and add some friends. (Make sure you’re careful about the username you choose, as you won’t be able to change it. Since you may use Snapchat for professional purposes, choose as professional username as possible.)

You also can use a public/professional/company profile as you get used to the app. But until then, play around with your personal account to get used to its quirks and capabilities. Have fun!

Learn the lingo: a Snap is a message that’s deleted. A Story is an image or even video that’s accessible to recipients for up to 24 hours.

  1. Once you start using the app for recruiting, get creative!

Online marketing company HubSpot has a nice blog post on how to use Snapchat for business, including tips on using it for recruiting (scroll down to the last one, about HubSpot’s own used of the app for recruiting).

  1. Post live videos on Snapchat.

Are you holding a big conference, seminar or recruiting event? If so, send a photo, video, or clips of speakers, etc. to your followers. Get them involved!

  1. Use Snapchat’s Stories feature to post job opportunities.

Tape the hiring manager talking a bit about the opportunity – make sure he talks about why it’s a great opportunity for someone – and ask people to send in their resumes.

  1. Video team members talking about their day-to-day lives at work.

Use Stories and send the short videos to your followers. Doing so gives potential candidates a peek into your culture. Provide Snaps and Stories about team member birthdays, promotions, team meetings and outings. You get the idea.

In other words, stay professional, but show your potential candidates the exciting and fun things that take place day-to-day at your firm.

Speaking of fun, it may sound corny, but we do love to match great candidates with terrific employers in Orange and Los Angeles counties. When you have a direct-hire, temp-to-hire or temporary opportunity at your company, call upon Helpmates to find you the talent you need. Contact one of our Southern California offices today.

5 Things to Do In Your First Days on the Job

You’ve just started your new job. You want to impress your new manager and get along well with your new coworkers.

LA jobs

To help you do so, we present you with five things you should aim to do on your first few days and weeks at your new employer.

Take a look below.

  1. Get there early and stay late.

First impressions matter and if you’re late for your first day – or first few days – you’re sending the message that the job is one you’ll get to when you get to. Instead, make sure you arrive on time. Arriving even a little early is better.

As for clocking out, aim to stay at least until quitting time. Staying 10-20 minutes after also is a good thing to do.

  1. Set up some one-on-one meetings with co-workers and others in your company.

We’re not talking lunch here, at least not yet. What we mean is that we believe you should make a point of meeting with new colleagues and supervisors (even people in other departments with whom you will be in contact) so that you can get to know them better. This includes finding out about what they do at the company, how long they’ve worked there, why they chose the company, and to ask questions about the ins and outs of your new employer’s culture. You also will get to know your new colleagues on a more personal level, helping you create a strong relationship from the beginning.

  1. Ask questions. A lot of questions.

You’re the new guy or gal, so don’t be afraid to ask questions. Remember: you may not know what you don’t know. So ask your supervisor to be very clear on his or her expectations. Ask specifically what your duties and goals are. Ask colleagues for help and advice. You’ll come across as a team player and approachable if you do.

  1. Talk less and listen more.

This applies even if you’re a new manager and, if you’re not, make sure you’re contributing knowledge and insights and volunteering for projects, but definitely don’t hog conversations. Instead sit back and observe. When you do speak, make most of the words coming out of your mouth questions, not statements.

  1. Remember to always talk nicely about your former employer.

Yes, perhaps your ex-manager truly was the boss from hell, or a co-worker really did try to sabotage your good work. But you’re unproven. You’re not truly accepted yet and trashing former bosses and colleagues just makes you look…immature and a gossip (which makes you untrustworthy).

If you believe it’s time to move on from one employer to the next, take a look at our current – and ever changing – job opportunities in Southern California. If you see one or more that’s interesting, apply! And if you don’t, contact the Helpmates office nearest you about registering with us so that we can contact you quickly when a position better suited to you appears.

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