Helpmates Staffing Services Once Again Wins Two of Inavero’s 2018 Best of Staffing® Diamond Awards

Helpmates Staffing – once again! – has been named to the “Best of Staffing” list.  For the 9th straight year! We are way beyond thrilled! And honored!!

Helpmates Staffing  Services has earned Inavero’s Best of Staffing® Talent and Client Diamond Awards after winning the best “Best of Staffing” award in each category at least five years in a row.

Only 2 percent of all staffing firms in the U.S. and Canada win the Best of Staffing award and only 33 percent of the Best of Staffing Award winners also earned the diamond distinction this year.

More than 1.2 million people (staffing candidates and clients) across the country provided feedback on many of the nation’s staffing firms. Award winners are determined by the percentage of satisfaction scores of 9 or 10 (out of a possible 10) given to them by their placed job candidates and clients.

Helpmates Wins Best of Staffing Diamond Awards Again

Helpmates won in four areas:

  • Client Satisfaction Award (9th year in a row)
  • Talent Satisfaction Award (7th year in a row)
  • The Best of Staffing Client Diamond Award (4th year in a row)
  • The Best of Staffing Talent Diamond Award (2nd year in a row)

What’s particularly important in this year’s awards is the fact that our Net Promoter Score (NPS), a customer metric that measure the loyalty between a provider (Helpmates) and its customers (clients and candidates/talent). Helpmates’ 2018 NPS score was 51.3 percent far above the staffing industry average of just 9 percent.

We need to acknowledge the dedication and extremely hard work our internal Helpmates team members performed on our behalf in order to earn us these important awards. We are grateful beyond words that our clients and temporary associates appreciate the work that our recruiters, branch managers and sales professionals do on their behalf.

All of us here at Helpmates intend to continue that hard work throughout the rest of this year and beyond, committing once again to ensuring that Southern California candidates and businesses find terrific work and the top talent possible.

Finally, thank you to our clients and candidates: it’s a great honor to work for and with you and we are exceedingly grateful for your belief in us!

Is THIS Why the Candidate Said No to Your Job Offer?

Yours is a nice company filled with nice people who work hard and aim to do their best in their jobs. Your receptionists are pleasant. Your HR department is filled with people-persons. You feel your managers are professional and have great communication skills.

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Then why do so many job candidates feel they’ve been treated so shoddily?

Yes, that’s right: too many companies make the application, interviewing and job offer process tough for applicants:

  • They don’t let rejected candidates know they didn’t get the job.
  • They make candidates jump through hoops to even apply. (WHY – in this age of identity theft – are employers still insisting on online applications that applicants provide social security numbers!?)
  • They call applicants at their current job insisting on having a phone interview right then.
  • They won’t accommodate candidates who can only interview in person after hours.
  • They put them through impersonal preliminary interviews.
  • They insist on tough panel interviews.
  • An experienced candidate contacts a hiring manager directly but the manager insists the candidate contact HR first
  • Candidates with several years of experience must still take basic-level skills testing.
  • And so on.

It’s tough to find great people. But too many companies still treat candidates as if it were 2008, the peak of the Great Recession, when great people were plentiful and businesses could pick and choose among the best job candidates.

Instead, it’s 2018 and the tables have turned: candidates get to choose among the best job opportunities!

This is important when it comes to hiring top talent because 79 percent of those surveyed said they would be “unlikely” to accept a job offer if they felt they were treated poorly during the recruiting process.

And it gets worse: 27 percent of respondents said they might talk about their poor experience on their social media channels!

What’s the right way to treat candidates?  With considerable courtesy and attention. Look at it this way: it’s something of a courtship today between employers and candidates, with companies doing the wooing and candidates saying yes or no to making a commitment.

So court your candidates! How do you do so?

  • Be accommodating to their schedules: interview them after hours, if necessary.
  • Make it easy for them to apply. Allow them, for example, to simply send a resume and cover letter as application. Ask for references only once you’re thinking of hiring and individual. Leave the nitty-gritty paperwork (and asking for their SSN) when they start the job, not before.
  • Send emails – or even videos — about the company culture, dress code, directions, etc. to those people you invite for an interview. This helps them get to know you before meeting and helps them know how to dress, where to park, etc.
  • Hiring managers: welcome phone calls from candidates who have the chutzpah to pick up the phone. Most applicants won’t; doing so shows assertiveness, courage and not a small amount of self-confidence, all terrific traits to have in employees.
  • Make a decision quickly and let interviewees know when you expect to make it. In fact, explain your next steps in the recruiting process clearly. If there’s a delay, let all interviewees know of it.
  • If you interview a candidate but decide not to hire her, she deserves the courtesy of a phone call from the hiring manager letting her know so. After all, she took several hours out of one of more of her days to visit your offices. It’s simple common courtesy.
  • Let all non-interview applicants know when the job is filled. An e-mail message or snail-mailed letter is sufficient.

When you need help attracting, interviewing and, yes, even courting top candidates in Southern California, let Helpmates help you source, interview, vet, and place them. Contact the office nearest you to learn how we can help you make job candidates feel like the VIPs they are in today’s tough talent-search market.

All I Want for Christmas is a Great 2018

Chances are good that you want your career/job situation to be the greatest it can be. With Christmas and the season of giving gifts upon us, it’s understandable if you’re hoping that this coming year will give you all you hope for and desire.

better career in 2018

And it can, so long as you realize you are the one who will deliver that gift. In other words, effort and some sacrifice on your part are what will help you obtain the career goals you dream of.

Happily, you really need only two things to make your job situation/career great this coming year.

So write a “Dear Santa” letter to yourself and ask yourself for these things:

  1. I will give myself the gift of additional training/education.

No one wanting to build a career – or stay employed – should think he or she can sit around and do the same old, same old every year and not feel the consequences at some point.

Additional training/education/certification always is going to be critical to success in the job market of tomorrow. Technology is changing such that artificial intelligence more than likely will (disrupt the employment prospects of millions now-employees in the next few years.

(Just some of the careers/jobs that could be affected: dermatologists, lawyers, sports journalists, financial reporters, retail clerks, border patrol agents, middle managers, pharmacy technicians, program software, and  more.)

Bottom line? The next time your boss asks if you want to go to a seminar on such and such, say yes (and then ask if you also can get certified in it).

  1. I will give myself the present of learning how to be a better “political” animal in the workplace.

Office politics exists. The most successful among us learn how to make their way through it with grace and skill because those who rise to the top are able to:

  • Be friendly – but not too much so – with everyone.
  • Stand up to bullies without becoming a bully themselves.
  • Take bad news stoically.
  • Give bad news with kindness yet firmness.
  • Know when to take a stand and know when to stand back.

Some people appear to easily navigate the politics of the workplace. Others struggle. But all of us can learn how to improve our own skills dealing with it.

Success truly comes easier if you can promote yourself and your “causes” fairly with your boss, clients and co-workers. Learning the “art” of office politics can be a terrific gift you give yourself this coming year.

Would another great Christmas gift to yourself be a new job? If you’re looking for work in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas, take a look at Helpmates’ current job openings.

If You Want a Raise, Be Prepared

So you’ve been working hard, really hard at your job. People have noticed and commented. Your boss has noticed and commented positively.

Then performance reviews roll around. Your boss speaks highly of your work and gives you a very positive review. And you wait, expectantly: you know that mention of a raise, perhaps even a promotion is coming. Sure as know that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, a raise is coming. You. Just. Know. It.

And then? Bupkis. The boss never mentions a raise. The word promotion never leaves her lips.

You, naturally, are stumped. What happened?

You didn’t ASK for a raise is what happened!

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Of course, some bosses automatically reward hard work with raises, but not always. Your boss has many other things on her mind: she needs to make sure the big project gets done on time. She needs to keep her own boss happy. She has plenty of fires to put out, people to manage and worries of which you have no idea. There’s a lot your boss needs to manage and know.

But one thing she doesn’t know is that you want a raise and she doesn’t know it because you haven’t told her!

Asking for a raise is the first step to getting one. The most important step. But it’s not the only step: you need to prove to your boss that you deserve one!

Before the Ask, the Preparation

You can’t simply approach your boss and say “Boss, I’ve been working hard; I’d like a raise.” If you want a raise, you do need to work hard, but then you need to show how that hard work has benefited your boss, your department and/or company in some tangible way.

And that is where the preparation comes in. Follow these four steps as you prepare.

  1. The process starts weeks and months before you ask.

As you perform your job, send your boss quarterly, monthly or even weekly updates. Tell her what you’ve accomplished in measurable terms (you brought in $X in new sales, you posted X blog posts, you handled X number of customer complaints, you’re halfway through a project and are two weeks ahead, etc.)

If you do something extraordinary (landed an account three times your usual size, for example), include that, as well.

Sending these reports does two things: it keeps your supervisor apprised of your accomplishments and it acts as a way for you to remember your accomplishments months later. After all, it’s easy to forget you completed a project three weeks ahead of schedule six months later.

  1. Don’t feel you can ask for a raise only at your annual performance review.

If you believe you’ve truly gone far above what’s required of you and if you know – and can show – how that work as helped your boss, department or company accomplish its own goals, there’s no need to wait to ask for a raise. When extraordinary work has been accomplished, it’s appropriate to ask for a reward soon after.

  1. Think about how your boss likes to be approached about important things and act accordingly.

Does your boss prefer directness? If so, you may want to set an appointment and let her know upfront you want to discuss a raise. If your manager prefers a more subtle approach to important topics, bring the raise up in a weekly or monthly check-in meeting. In other words, study when your supervisor is most amenable to considering requests and approach her in the way that has the best chance of success for her.

At the least, if you feel she’s troubled, in a bad mood, stressed, etc. at the time of your meeting, see if you can reschedule.

  1. Prepare your case.

Before meeting with your manager, look through your updates and collect proper “evidence.” Show the facts: that you brought in the big client, finished the project early, saved the company money in some way, received an “atta boy” letter from the CEO for your great work, and so on.

Then, do your homework: do some research to find out what raise percentages usually are given out at your company, in your region, in your industry. You want to ask for a reasonable raise, but as mentioned below, if you accomplished the extraordinary, feel free to ask for a larger-than-normal raise. Just be doubly prepared to give solid reasons why your accomplishment warrants it.

You’ll probably be nervous asking for more money, and that’s OK. Just don’t let fear hold you back from asking for a raise when it’s deserved.

Not all raises take place with your current employer: switch to a new employer and you typically receive a 4 percent raise just by leaving one company for another.

If you think it’s time to move on from your Los Angeles or Orange County job, check out Helpmates’ current openings and, if one interests you, apply for it!

Why a Cover Letter MATTERS

Job openings always ask to see a resume and often ask for cover letters, but not always. So as a candidate you may think that a cover letter is an “option,” as in “not required.”

And it may well not be required, but it’s never not an option, not if you want to greatly increase your chances of getting an interview.

orange county jobs

A cover letter can be very powerful. It can help your application stand out in a sea of candidates with about the same skills, background and education requested in the job posting.  It can be “the determining factor” in whether or not you get called in for an interview.

The Many Benefits of a Cover Letter

  1. It helps you stand out.

As mentioned above, when having to choose who to interview among similar candidates, a well-crafted cover letter can end up being your golden ticket to the interview.

  1. It can showcase skills and background that don’t fit in a resume.

You are so much more than the work history on your resume. There are difficult projects you completed that need to be highlighted, challenges overcome in a job not easily delineated in a resume, skills possessed that aren’t required in a job description but which are helpful and should be described, and so on.

  1. You can target a cover letter easily for each position for which you apply.

Every account manager position is different from any other account manager opportunity and while your resume will speak highly of your abilities and accomplishments as an account manager in the past, your cover letter allows you to speak specifically as to how and why those skills will help this employer.

For example, the job posting mentions that the person selected for the account manager position will be expanding into a new product territory. You worked at your last employer for three years, but six months of your tenure there saw you expanding a product line’s sales by 150 percent in a new territory. An accomplishment such as that should be placed near the top of your cover letter to pique a hiring manager’s or recruiter’s interest! (And also mentioned on your resume.)

  1. A cover letter can explain gaps in your employment history.

Few of us have a job history with no breaks. If have a job history hole of more than six months, you can address the reason in the cover letter. This is especially important if the gap in work history is recent.

Examples: “After taking time off to complete my master’s degree in psychology in a year…” “After taking time off to raise my children until they reached elementary school age…” “After taking time off to help care for my father with Alzheimer’s disease…”

Bottom line? Always include a cover letter for each application. Write a different cover letter for each position, highlighting the skills, background and accomplishments relevant to the position that showcase your value to the employer.

We’ve been helping Southern Californians find – and land – great jobs for 45 years, so we know a thing or two about making candidates attractive to employers. If you’re looking for new opportunities, check out our current job postings and then either apply (don’t forget the cover letter!) and/or contact the Helpmates office nearest you. Contact us to learn more about our recruiting services.

You’re Working Hard, Yet You Haven’t Been Promoted. What to Do

You’ve worked at your employer for at least a year, possibly even two or three. You’ve worked hard, have always come in on time (if not even early) and never left until after everyone else had gone home.  You did more than was expected of you and were often complimented on the great work you did. Your boss also has given you an atta boy/atta girl several times over the last few months.

Yet as much as you want a promotion, as much as you absolutely deserve a promotion, you’ve watched as others received them, but not you.

jobs in Los Angeles

What gives? We’ve listed several possibilities below.

  1. You never actually asked for a promotion.

That’s right: you need to ask.

Should your boss notice your great work and accomplishments? Sure! But will she? Maybe, but maybe not. After all, she has her own concerns and more than likely is focused mostly on making sure she does her own job well. She needs to be sure she’s keeping her own boss happy (and securing her own promotions). And even if she does notice the great job you’re doing – and certainly appreciates it – she  may have thought that if you wanted a promotion, you would have asked for it.

Scenarios where the boss surprises you with a promotion and a fat raise? Those usually happen only in the movies. You need to ask to get.

  1. Your boss doesn’t think you’re ready.

Your supervisor did notice all your hard work and accomplishments, but when you bring the subject up, your boss tells you she thinks that while you’re on the path to promotion, she doesn’t think you’re quite ready.

Why might she think it’s not your time yet?

  • Your boss may feel you’re not enough of a team player. This trait is important if you want a promotion that moves you up to management.
  • Your supervisor feels that you don’t handle stressful situations well or that you’re too much of a people pleaser, and wants you to “mature” a bit more.
  • And so on.
  1. You didn’t show your boss the value of a promotion.

Just because you work hard and go the extra mile in your current position in no way qualifies you for a promotion. A promotion always entails more responsibility, more “skin in the game,” so to speak. So what has all that effort provided your boss, in addition to simple hard work?

Did you bring in more clients? Did save the company more money? Did you make the department more efficient? In other words, what tangible results did your work produce?

  1. There’s no benefit to your boss.

Yes, this appears selfish on her part, but in order to get a promotion, your boss needs to get something out of it. It must be something that benefits her, personally. For example, by promoting you, does a particular goal or project she wants completed get completed because of your particular skills?

If you’ve been working hard, providing terrific and provable value to your employer and have asked for a promotion to no avail, it may be time to move on. Helpmates can help. Take a look at our current job opportunities. Yes, many of our openings are temporary, but many are regular, full-time career positions.  Plus, temporary positions often can advance your career.

Contact the Helpmates office nearest you today to apply.

Establishing a Successful Internship Program

It’s the end of March and you know what that means: thousands of college students are looking for summer internships!!!

Orange County staffing service

If your Los Angeles- or Orange County-area company doesn’t already have an internship program, why not? Whether paid or un-paid (the student receives no monetary compensation but does receive college credit for her work with you), internships greatly benefit both the student and the employer: the student gets some real-world experience (that could lead to a real-world paying job) and the employer gets to have a top-notch student in his office, eager to work and learn – and possibly work after the internship! In other words, starting an internship program at your business can be a terrific recruiting tool.

March and April are Prime Time for Students to Seek out Summer Internships: How to Start One

If you’ve never had an internship program before, take a look below; we’ve put together an eight-step process for you to follow (and make your own, depending on your firm’s specific needs). Take a look below:

  1. Talk to a few local colleges.

If you’ve never hosted interns before, you’ll have a lot of questions that need answering. You’ll need to speak with college career offices to see what requirements they have as to what is acceptable in an internship (hiring someone just to get you coffee and run errands usually is not considered an internship). After all, the college wants its students to learn something during the students’ time with you. The college may ask you to outline what its students will learn and how you will ensure they learn it.

  1. Decide how many interns you can handle and where they will work.

Not every department in every company can host interns. Departments which typically host interns include marketing, human resources, accounting/finance, and even operations. Talk to department heads to see how many they may want/can handle before promoting internships.

  1. Decide if the internship will be paid or un-paid.

Don’t be worried if you cannot pay your interns. So long as they receive college credit, you will have students applying for your opportunity.

  1. Design the program.

A good internship structure will have learning objectives, daily responsibilities, both short- and long-term projects, evaluation procedures, written expectations, orientation, and an off-boarding process.

  1. Evaluate and decide on the skills, educational background, etc. you feel your interns will need.

For example, if you’re opening up a marketing internship, you will want a student with at least one or more classes in marketing, public relations/communications.

  1. Post the position.

You’ll want to post it with the many colleges and universities in Southern California. (You may decide to post only with a few, or with all; you can even post the opportunity at nationwide internship-posting sites.)

  1. Interview, check references and hire.

Practically every student you interview will have some sort of job history: it’s important that you check to make sure they have a good work ethic, no criminal background, and so on. Even if your firm’s HR department is in charge of the program, make sure the intern’s direct supervisor has a big say in choosing the final candidate.

If you’d like to hire your intern, but are still a tad uncertain if you want to bring her onboard permanently, Helpmates can put her on our payroll until if/when you decide to transfer her to your own.

Want to learn more? Contact the Helpmates office nearest you today.

Ghosting Isn’t Right in Romance and it’s NOT Ok to Do to Job Candidates

Have you ever been “ghosted”? That time when a romantic partner just disappears – not returning calls or texts – just suddenly cutting off all communication, as if the relationship never existed?

It’s a cruel and immature way to end a relationship. Young people tend to do it because they are afraid of the reaction they may get when they want to break up with someone if they were to do it in person or over the phone or text.

Orange County staffing firm

But even adults ghost. (Even middle-aged adults, if the story that Cherlize Theron ghosted Sean Penn is true.)

And, be honest, isn’t there at least one time you never got back to a candidate after interviewing him or her ? You just….disappeared?

We’ve all done it probably. After all, as recruiters we’re overwhelmed with candidates and position requisitions. Or as hiring managers, we have our regular jobs to do, not to mention interviewing several candidates, and then conducting second and possibly third interviews, negotiating salary with the candidate we do choose, onboarding the candidate and getting him up to speed. It’s easy to forget about the candidates we met with but didn’t choose.

But they haven’t forgotten us. And since many companies don’t even bother to send out a “thank you for applying but we choose a more qualified candidate” letter anymore your candidates — the people who took time out of their days (possibly more than once) to come to your office for several hours are sitting at home. Waiting. Wondering.

This is No Way to Treat a Candidate!

While it’s common practice now not to acknowledge applicants who aren’t interviewed for a position, we feel that anyone who takes the time to come in for an interview deserves the courtesy of a phone call to hear that the hiring manager chose someone else.

And that phone call should come from the hiring manager. (At the very least, the hiring manager should send an e-mail to the not-chosen candidate.)

More Than Just the Right Thing to Do

Taking the time to contact an interviewed candidate not only is courteous, but can help a candidate stay interested in you in the future. After all, a talented individual may not be the right fit for one position, but could be a great one for another. Just imagine the cost savings: instead of having to cull through dozens of resumes, speak to several more candidates, and so on you could instead just bring him in to make sure he’s a good fit. No need to go through the interview process all over again!

But if you never let him know he didn’t get the job, not only do you not keep him in your pipeline, he now has negative thoughts and feelings about you. Don’t forget, people tend to share negative experiences they’ve had with businesses more than they share positive encounters. And with social media at his fingertips……

Bottom line: calling a candidate to let him know he didn’t get the job not only shows respect and courtesy, it helps create a positive candidate experience. On the other hand, a negative candidate experience can be “self-destructive” and have undesirable consequences for your firm down the road.

Sorting through resumes and performing preliminary screening activities on candidates for your Orange County or Los Angeles company can take considerable time. Let Helpmates do this tiresome but critical aspect of your interview process for you. Contact us today.

We’re More Alike than We Think: Downplaying Generational Differences in the Workplace

You’ve no doubt heard it often: Millennials want to be groomed for advancement while members of Generation X are wanna-be entrepreneurs. And Boomers? They’re definitely not shy about challenging authority.

Pretty much accepted as true among most is that the generations are very different, so much so that entire books are written about how they can get along when working together.

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But are they really? We believe the generations coming together in today’s workplace are more alike than they are different. Hear us out below.

  1. Someone may be a Boomer but not remember the Beatles’ heyday.

What we mean by this is that each generation is about 20 years in length: Boomers, for example, are those born between 1946 and 1964 while Generation X generally is believed to be those born between 1965 and 1980. So a Boomer born in 1957 is going to have a very different cultural experience than her older counterpart born in 1947. The younger boomer may very well have a life experience more in common with a Generation X-er born in 1965 than an older Boomer.

A 1957 Boomer with an older sister may well remember her sister’s excitement about the Beatles coming to America (1964) when the Boomer would have been 7. But a 1957 Boomer with only younger siblings may not have experienced their music possibly until the band already had broken up (1969, when the Boomer would have been 12 and in middle-school) because there was no one in the house going nuts over them when she was younger.

Our point? Our outlooks and experiences in life often come about due to our family circumstances rather than our age. Older siblings give us entre to things four-year-olds otherwise wouldn’t be aware of. Even stations such as Nickleodeon and  now Netflix have for years shown old television shows such as the The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Andy Griffith Show and others to generations far too young to have seen them when first aired; yet later generations, too, have them as cultural touchstones. And what Generation X-er and Millennial haven’t bonded over their mutual love of Sesame Street (which first aired in 1969 and continues strong today)?

What’s more members of a generation born at each “end” more than likely have more in common with someone born a few years before or later, even if that individual is in a different “generation.” After all, a 10-year-age difference among any member of any generation is a much harder gap to close than the gap between someone five years younger older.

In other words, you may be surprised how much in common you have with a co-worker of a different generation.

(Here’s a fun quiz for everyone: How Millennial Are You? by the Pew Research Center. You may be surprised by how close to a different generation you are. For example, Dan Struve, our CEO, is a Boomer. He took the quiz and he scored an 80, making him pretty much a Millennial than a Boomer when it comes to activities and outlook.)

  1. Technology is the great equalizer of generations.

In fact, could we all be becoming Millennials?

Millennials, conventional wisdom goes, are:

  • Connected to their digital devices 24/7.
  • Leave their employer quickly (they stay at a job two or three years, tops).
  • They need constant feedback. And it better be of the positive variety!
  • They require flexibility and choice.
  • They want their work to have meaning and be of use to others in some way.
  • They want opportunity for advancement.

Just like the post linked to above, we argue that all generations are like Millennials more than not when it comes to the above. Proof?

No one likes to be stereotyped; all of us all think we are the exception to any “rule” and wish to be treated as individuals.

When you need help finding great people to work in your company or department, call upon Helpmates. We can help you find the great people to help your company reach its goals.

5 Tips to Boost Your Interview Confidence

Few of us enjoy going on job interview, which is a shame in a way because interviews are a great way to learn more about ourselves, various companies, different ways of doing things, making new acquaintances – possibly new colleagues – and so on.

In fact, learning more about different companies and people (potential managers and even colleagues) perhaps is the best thing about going to a job interview: we’re rather like a sleuth, digging down and trying to find out how we might fit into a company’s business paradigm.

Orange County jobs

What’s more, looking at yourself as something of an undercover agent also is a great way to help you boost your own confidence at the interview. After all, never forget that you are interviewing the hiring manager and company, too: just as your possible future manager is trying to see if you’ll be a good fit on her team, you need to find out if the company and opportunity is a good fit for you.

Four Additional Job Interview Confidence Boosters

  1. Research the company as much as possible before your interview: information is power.

The more you know about a company before you meet a recruiter or hiring manager, the more confident you’ll be. You’ll know how your particular skills and background will help the firm move forward and you’ll be able to speak to the hiring manager’s needs right away:

“I saw on your website that you are opening a new location soon. Will you be performing billing services at the new office? If so, I believe my experience with a former employer when I was the only medical biller in the department, helping to train new people in my office as they came on, would be a great help.”

  1. Remember the VALUE you bring.

Noting the fictional medical biller’s statement above, do you see what she just did there? She took note of the company’s plans and she talked about how her experience and expertise will help the hiring manager: she can help train new people in a new office and get the office up to speed quickly. Who wouldn’t want to hire her!? She’s a problem-solver! 

Knowing how you can help a business overcome challenges and/or reach its goals not only helps you feel confident when you interview (you’re certain of your skills and talents), it also makes you the type of candidate hiring managers hire.

  1. As hard as it may be, don’t wonder to yourself about how you’re doing.

Instead, simply aim to connect with the interviewer. This point echoes the first one: you’re on a mission to learn as much as you can about the needs of the interviewer (you’re an investigator), so don’t focus so much on yourself and instead try to listen to, engage with – on an equal level – and connect with the  hiring manager.

In other words, don’t think about your performance aim to put the other person at ease. Taking the focus off yourself can do wonders for alleviating your anxiety.

  1. Picture the moment you hear “I’d like to bring you on board.”

You know your strengths. You know how your skills benefit the employer. You know you’re a great fit. Remember that. Ruminate on it before the interview and then relax. You’ve got this!

Need some help landing job interviews in Orange or Los Angeles counties? Helpmates is here for you. Take a look at our current job opportunities and if you feel one or more is right for you, either apply online or visit the branch that posted the job. We look forward hearing from you!

 

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