How to Stand Out on a Temporary Assignment

And Therefore Have a Better Chance of Being Hired on Full Time

Many people think the job opportunities offered via staffing agencies such as Helpmates are “just” temporary assignments.

Many are, but many of our assignments do see our associates getting hired on to our client’s own payroll after a few weeks or months. (A very happy day for us as well as for our employee and client!)

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We understand that many folks are looking for steady, full-time work. “Temporary assignment” doesn’t sound nearly as reliable (although many of our temporary opportunities last for several weeks or even months).

So because we understand you may be hoping to turn that short-term assignment into a full-time position with a client, we’ve put together a short primer on how to turn a temporary assignment into a more permanent position.

Step 1: Be a great temporary specialist

Take on the assignment with the attitude that it’s a real job. Which it is. We wouldn’t have hired you and sent you to our client on assignment unless we thought you had the skills needed and would be a great addition to our client’s workforce.

In addition to your job skills, our clients are looking for skills such as commitment, a great work ethic, dependability, curiosity, and so on.

Showcasing these qualities is the first step you need to take for a client to look at you as a potential new-hire someday.

Step 2: Think of your assignment as the first few weeks in a new job

You know how it is: you start a new job and you want to impress your new boss and colleagues. You’re on your best behavior. You try to do things before being asked and solving problems you know your boss needs solved. After all, that’s really why employers hire people for: to help them reach their goals and solve problems.

Working on assignment allows you to “prove” you have the ability to do this. In many ways, you’re in a better position than people interviewing for more permanent jobs because you’ll be able to prove you can do the job while they can only say they can.

Step 3: Let your staffing recruiter as well as your assignment manager know you’re interested in being hired at the company someday.

Ask for a meeting and tell your manager at work that you’d like to work at his or her company should an opening occur.

At pretty much the same time – or even before – let your recruiter/manager at the staffing company know, as well.

Never worry: if the client wants to hire you, the staffing company will not stop it. It may be delayed a bit but if the client company wants to bring you on to its payroll, the staffing company will be pleased. Truly.

One thing to look out for: a client manager who offers you a full-time position and asks you to not tell the staffing company. This is going against the contract the two businesses have with each other. The manager you’re working with on assignment knows this; he or she basically is knowingly breaking the contract.

Don’t be surprised if the manager you work with at the assignment asks you to submit a resume and fill out an application. This pretty much is par for the course.

Also, you should look at the company’s internal job opportunities because many companies allow temporary specialists to apply before the jobs are opened to the general public. Let both your staffing manager as well as the assignment manager know that you’re applying for one or more positions.

Check out temp-to-hire assignments

If you’re looking for full-time work, check out the job opportunities at Helpmates. You’ll see temporary assignments, direct-hire opportunities and other assignments known as temp-to-hire.

These are positions that clients ask us to fill because they are looking to bring someone on in a temporary capacity in the hopes the company will want to bring the person on to their payroll in about three months or so – and that the specialist on assignment also will want to do so.

If any temporary, temp-to-hire or direct-hire assignments appeal to you as you search, follow the application instructions or contact the Helpmates branch office nearest you for more information.

How to Make Sure You Won’t Be Miserable at a New Job

Make sure this isn’t you:

You start a new job, one you’re really excited to begin. But in just a few weeks – maybe even just days – you find that you’re actually miserable.

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You realize too late that you chose to take a job that’s just awful.

Here’s how to make sure a new job will be one you enjoy.

  • It all starts with the job description.

Read the job description carefully. It often tells you what type of company you’ll find yourself in.

If it describes the company or department as lively, energetic, with a big focus on teamwork, but you’re shy, prefer working alone if possible and want quiet, it may not be a good fit. And, if it appears too quiet and you like intermingling with coworkers, it also may not be the job for you.

  • Take a look at where the job is located and consider the commute.

Take a close look at the job description. Don’t assume that you know the name of the company so you therefore know exactly where the job is: the job may be in a satellite location.

Folks who live and work in Los Angeles and Orange counties aren’t afraid of “long” commutes, of course, but if your commute will be 30-40 minutes or more, consider hard before choosing this position, especially if the commute will be an hour or more: long commutes absolutely can make you miserable. (Or as this article’s headline states: ”Long Commutes Destroy Happiness.” How’s THAT for being for being blunt!?)

And if you think a higher salary will compensate for that long commute and make your life less miserable, you’d be wrong.

  • When interviewing with your future boss, how do you feel?

This pretty much means “going with your gut” and your gut usually isn’t wrong.

If you feel uncomfortable with your boss, if you feel your personalities will clash, you’re probably right. No amount of money or career progression will make this situation better. You’re boss isn’t going to change. If anyone does, it will have to be you. That’s really no way to have to live one-third of your day (8 hours on the job): to twist yourself into a pretzel in order to “get along.”

  • Ask to see where you’d actually be working.

This also is “going with your gut.” If you see the office, the department, the warehouse, etc. and it’s dark and dingy, or your colleagues appear to be unhappy (or sourpusses). Or they’re absolutely ebullient and you think they’re too much so? Again, go with your gut.

Our surroundings matter. Naturally, a distribution center will be noisy; you understand that. But is it dirty? Is it dusty? Does it have plenty of sunshine? If it does and you don’t mind, good for you? Really!

If you work in customer service, you know that you’ll be hearing your co-workers. But do they talk over one another? Or are they too quiet? How do you feel when you see the room? Again, your surroundings matter. Don’t ignore this sign that you could feel out of place.

  • Ask to see if you could speak with a few of your future colleagues.

You won’t be visiting with them long, but you’ll get a sense of their personalities and how they react to you. Again, your gut won’t let you down: if you feel uncomfortable in their presence, this may not be a good place for you. Even if you get a sense that just one of them is stand-offish or, conversely, too friendly, that also may be a sign, depending on your particular personality.

  • Make sure to ask about duties and hours.

Jobs may say they are eight hours a day, but they often are longer. Ask about flexibility: can you work at home some days? How does the company feel about leaving work early if a child is sick, etc.?

Bottom line? The more you know about the environment (both physical and personal), the corporate culture and your boss’ expectations, etc., the better you’ll be able to sit alone for a bit after your potential new boss offers you the position to decide if this job is a good move for you.

If not, say no to the offer. Keep looking. A great job IS out there for you!

Speaking of great jobs….

Take a look at Helpmates’ current opportunities. See one or more you like? Then either follow instructions for applying and/or reach out the branch office nearest you.

How Focusing on What You Want to Happen Can Make it Happen

Many people believe that what you think is what you are:

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  • If you believe you’re talented, you are.
  • If you believe you can’t learn hard things, you won’t.
  • If you think you’re attractive, you are.
  • If you conclude that you’ll never land a great job, you won’t.
  • If you believe you deserve a raise…you’ll probably get it.

Some people call thinking such as “The Law of Attraction.” That is, what you truly believe is yours WILL come to you.

Think about being rich: you’ll become rich. Think you’ll marry a princess: you’ll marry a princess. Think about becoming slim, you’ll become slim.

There’s a lot more to it, of course:

  • You must earn money, save/invest it wisely and in a few years, wealth probably will happen.
  • You must hang out where royalty does so that you can meet an actual princess. You’re probably going to need a similar level of education and common interests in order to catch her attention.
  • You’ll need to exercise and eat well in order to change your physique.

Nothing comes from merely thinking about it: action on your part is required.

But it is true that thoughts are extremely powerful. “Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t – you’re right,” is how Henry Ford put it.

Changing how you think about things really can help you reach a goal. For example, if you say “There aren’t any jobs out there,” how well do you think you’ll do in your job search? Or, if you were to say “There are many jobs that need my skills and background; I just need to find them,” do you think your search would be more successful (and even quicker)?

This is NOT to say that you don’t have real challenges:

If this has happened, you may feel powerless and victimized.

We urge you to shake that feeling off. Such feelings/thoughts do nothing to help you. It will take work but making a real effort to think positively about your situation can only help:

  • “My knowledge and skills learned over my 30-year career is really valuable to an employer.”
  • “My job loss means I can really focus for hours a day on my search.”
  • “There are so many remote-work jobs now; I won’t need a car to find a job.”

As you think positive thoughts, act positively. Reach out to employers and mention your extensive experience. Work six hours a day on your job search. Start walking as much as you can on errands and enjoy getting outdoors.

Exercise, eat well, revamp your resume, network with former colleagues and on LinkedIn.

Act in positive/helpful ways as you think positively and you will find work you enjoy.

If you’re currently looking for work, act today and look at Helpmates’ current job opportunities. If you find one that seems interesting, either follow the job posting’s application instructions, or contact the branch office nearest you.

Yes, Cover Letters Still Matter: They Can Help You Get an Interview

Cover letters, so old school and completely unnecessary, right?

NO!!!

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A well-written cover letter actually can help you get the job. Why? Because it can highlight your great interest in the opportunity. More importantly, it can showcase how you can help an employer solve its problems (which, remember, is why employers hire people).

What’s more, a cover letter actually  allows you to do something that you really can’t do until you’re sitting in a job interviews:

Ask for an interview!

Without a cover letter the only thing you’re sending an employer is your resume. (Sometimes not even that, if you’re applying online and the application is a form you fill out that doesn’t ask for – or allow you to include – a resume.)

Resumes used to put in black and white your contact info, your education, your skills and the jobs you’ve had. While you should write it such that it emphasizes your successes and the things you did for employers, it’s not a document in which you can ask for an interview.

Here’s the best part: simply asking for an interview in your cover letter actually increases your chances of getting an interview!

How to ask for an interview.

Don’t forget, in the body of your cover letter you need express your great interest in what the employer does and how you think you can help the company achieve its goals.

You do so by mentioning one or two things that you’ve done in the past that show how you have the skills, knowledge and experience to do so:

  • As a line manager in the Cerritos warehouse of my employer, I made it a point to get to know my team members personally, honoring birthdays, anniversaries, children’s accomplishments and so on. My own manager told me I appeared to “make work fun” for my team. Retention numbers also back this fact up: my manager told me attrition on the line declined by 15 percent – the most of any year – after my first full year on the job.”
  • During my two years as a CSR, I’ve been commended regularly by my manager for my efficiency as well as my customer reviews. My manager particularly has commented on my calm handling angry customers.

At the end of the cover letter (your concluding paragraph), you end by asking for an interview:

  • I’m excited about this opportunity as (position) with (company) and would enjoy the chance of meeting with you to discuss it more and – more importantly – the chance to discuss my experience and skills and how I can provide value to you. Please call me at XXX-XXX-XXXX or email me at name@emailaddress.com to schedule an interview.
  • Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I would like to interview with you to discuss how my skills and background can be of service to (company) as (position). My number is XXX-XXX-XXXX and my email address is name@emailaddress.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

Are you looking for work? Take a look at our current temporary, direct-hire and temp-to-hire job opportunities. If you find one or more that look interesting, follow the listing’s directions.

Even if you don’t see anything that looks appealing, register with the Helpmates branch office nearest you: we’re constantly getting new assignments, some of which are filled before we ever have time to list them on our website.

Make Your Resume Stand Out Now and in the Future

Most job seekers are aware that hiring managers spend precious little time looking at individual resumes. So, you need to capture their attention quickly and make them want to read more.

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But, in addition to incorporating information that will pull them in, you also want to avoid other problems that will get your resume tossed quickly in the trash can. Here are a few tips.

  1. Really watch for grammar and spelling errors.

This may seem so obvious that it does not need to be mentioned. But it does because it’s surprising how often errors crop up in resumes. After putting together many resumes for different job opportunities and reading them over, you are more prone to skim the writing and to fill in the gaps mentally. It’s therefore becomes easier to miss errors.

To prevent this, have friends or family members help out by reading the resumes. Each person should focus on one area, such as spelling or grammar and punctuation.

When a hiring manager sees an error, it does not make a good impression at all and can sink your chances of getting an interview.

  1. Tailor your resume to the job.

Each resume you send out needs to be customized for the job you are applying for. You need to take your cue from the job description, taking note of what keywords are used and what kinds of skills are emphasized. Then you need to use the same keywords in your resume and also highlight accomplishments that relate to the sought after skills mentioned in the job description.

  1. Watch your formatting.

The resume needs to be well organized and easy to read. Avoid large blocks of print and long sentences. Make sure you have adequate white space, using headings and short, compelling phrases. Use boldface and italics where appropriate, such as headings and text that you want to stand out.

Some people try to squeeze in more information by using a smaller font and shrinking the margins. But this is not a good idea because it makes the resume harder to read, and a hiring manager is not going to take the time to pick his way through it.

Review and edit your resume several times to make sure you have trimmed all unnecessary information, that your writing is simple, clear and direct, and not wordy.

  1. Focus on accomplishments, not job duties.

You are not going to impress anyone by simply listing job duties and responsibilities. You will make a more compelling case by listing your accomplishments. How did you change or improve things?

Include facts and figures to support your statements. You should not just say you increased sales, but exactly by how much.

You also don’t need to give information about every job you have ever had. If you have had jobs that bear little relevance to the one you are applying for, you can simply give a quick summary.

  1. Use active verbs.

Active verbs have the name because they show movement and action. For example, words such as led, managed, planned, produced and generated are all active verbs. These are the kinds of words you want to use in your resume to show your skills and abilities.

  1. Highlight important skills.

Skills that are essential to the job should be listed at the top of the resume in the professional summary. Don’t wait to list them later in a skills section, for example.

Your summary at the top of the resume is the equivalent of an elevator pitch – a short, powerful statement why the company should hire you.

Many people are looking for work now. If you haven’t lately, take a look at Helpmates’ current job opportunities and, if one or more interest you, follow the listing’s directions and/or contact the branch office nearest you.

Interviewing for a Remote Job? Ask These Questions

If you are interviewing for a remote job, the company’s culture becomes even more important. Why? The culture at the company will play a big role in how successful a person will be in such a job because collaboration, communication and teamwork become that much more important when everyone works remotely.

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Here are some important questions to ask about the job to make sure the company is providing the support you need to be successful.

  1. What kind of hours will you be working?

Most people assume if they are working remotely that they would have greater flexibility with their hours, being able to decide when they work. But the opposite tends to be the case. You will need to establish a regular schedule, one that coincides with the rest of your team.

Another thing you need to take into account if everyone on your team is working remotely across different time zones is the communication set up among everyone. If the time zones are different, it may require you to work at times outside of traditional work hours.

  1. How many people are working remotely?

You need to determine how common remote work is within the company. Is everyone working remotely, or will you be one of just a few people who are working from home? If everyone is working remotely, you will be working under the same conditions as everyone else, with the same opportunities as everyone else.

If, however, you will be just one of a few who are working remotely, it is more likely that you will have to make the effort to ensure you remain connected and are not missing out on any opportunities.

  1. How do people communicate?

It is important to ask about your supervisor’s management style because this acquires even greater importance for remote workers. Your supervisor cannot just drop by your desk to fill you in on something or give you an update. So, how they plan to keep everyone working together and informed is of primary importance.

You also need to find out what kind of access you will have to your manager. Ideally, you want to have the same kind of access that you would if you were working in an office. How often does he or she have meetings, and what kind of network platform does the company use? Do managers communicate often individually with the people on their team? How often do team members communicate with each other

If you ask how the supervisor plans to keep you connected and informed while working remotely, and he doesn’t have a good answer, that should raise a red flag. This is exactly the kind of thing that should have been worked out. If it isn’t, it shows the company doesn’t value their remote workers as much.

  1. How would you get feedback?

Ask them how they plan to give feedback to remote workers. If they have no procedure worked out, you can suggest one to them, such as getting together every few weeks to talk about goals and performance. If they balk at this idea, this is another red flag that they are not ready to invest in the growth of their remote workers.

  1. How is the company improving the remote work environment?

Working remotely presents its own unique kinds of challenges and obstacles. The hiring manager should be able to describe how the company is responding to those problems and what they are doing to enhance the remote work environment.

If you’re looking for work – whether it’s a remote job or not – make sure to check out Helpmates’ latest job opportunities. If one or more appeal to you, apply online or contact the Helpmates branch nearest you.

Preparing for a Final Job Interview

Congratulations! You have made it past the first round of interviews for a job opening. You now face the prospect of a final round. How should you prepare for it? This next round will be a little different from the first, so you need to change your preparation a little to get ready for it. Here are a few tips.

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  1. Look back on your first interview

Consider how you performed during your first interview. What questions did you answer well and what questions do you feel you could have done a better job with? This will give you some indication about what you need to work on and how you can improve responses that fell short.

  1. Expect more detailed questions

The questions in the final interview are likely to go into more depth on your technical skills. There is also a greater chance that you will get more behavioral types of questions. You will be asked what you would do in different situations, what actions you would take, or how you would go about solving a particular problem.

And you may get more questions related to cultural fit. The interviewers will want to know if you are someone with whom they can work.

  1. Prepare to talk salary

You may be asked what you are looking for in terms of salary, so you should be prepared to give a range. This will require some research. You should find out what the salary is in your industry for this type of position. There are sites such as Payscale.com and Glassdoor.com that can give you the information you need.

  1. A broader perspective

In a final interview, you are more likely to have a member of senior management present. He or she will likely be interested in more comprehensive, broad-spectrum issues that impact the entire company, rather than the nuts-and-bolts aspect of the job.

So you need to be prepared to talk about the value you can add to the company as a whole. Learn about the company’s goals and mission, the problems it faces, and give input on ways the company can reach those goals and solve their problems. Be able to look at things from a big picture perspective.

  1. Some possible final round questions

Because there may be different people present for the final interview, you may get some questions you were asked in the initial round. Others are common in final round interviews and could include:

Tell me about yourself.

You probably got this question during the first interview. But you may get it again at the final interview from a senior executive who was not present during the first one. Keep your answer brief, focusing on recent accomplishments and why you are applying for the job.

What are your career goals?

The purpose of this question is to gauge how your ambitions fit with the goals of the company. The hiring manager or other senior executive will want to determine if you are a good fit with the culture of the company. So, your answer should show that you have ambition but that your goals align with those of the job.

Are you interviewing anywhere else?

Honesty is the best policy in responding to this question. If you are interviewing elsewhere or are expecting other job offers, let them know. This may actually enhance your standing with the hiring manager because he or she will see that you are coveted by other employers.

However, if at the time of the interview you have no other offers you need to be honest about that as well. Don’t pretend that you do. If you begin with a fabrication like this, it will likely only lead to more falsehoods later to support it, which in the long run could get you into more trouble.

Is there anything else you want to ask us about?

This is often the last question at a final interview. You can use it as an opportunity to expand on previous responses that may have been a little off the mark.

Ready for a new job in 2021? Take a look at Helpmates’ current job openings and apply for any you feel are a good fit. You also may contact the branch office nearest you for more information.

The Job Skills You’ll Need in 2021 and Beyond

The pace of change continues to accelerate in our society, led by technological progress and the accompanying economic growth. Growth and change will only continue to pick up speed into the future. In such an environment, what are the skills and abilities workers will need to navigate the world of work?

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The skills necessary for success in the 21st century, as identified by business leaders and academics, are all connected to what is known as “deeper learning” or “higher order thinking skills”. These are skills such as analytic reasoning, complex problem solving and teamwork. They put a premium on flexibility and adaptability. They differ from more traditional types of skills in that they are not as content or knowledge-based.

It will certainly come as no surprise to hear that skill sets related to digital literacy will be highly valued. So-called “soft skills” (such as being able to get along with others and communication skills) will become increasingly important as well. Here are some of the key skills for the 21st century.

Learning and Innovation Skills

  1. Critical thinking

This involves analyzing facts to reach a conclusion or form a judgment. It is based on a rational, logical, objective evaluation of evidence.

  1. Problem solving

This is the use of different methods or strategies to find solutions to problems. There are many different methods depending on the type of problem. Some of the more common problem-solving strategies include abstraction, brainstorming, hypothesis testing, root cause analysis, and divide and conquer.

  1. Communication

Communication skills encompass both written and oral expression. These skills are necessary to express thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively.

  1. Collaboration

This skill involves the ability to work with others. It requires empathy, listening, tolerance, and good communication. People with collaboration skills can handle difficult situations, accept feedback, work with people of different cultures and backgrounds, and influence and persuade others. They know how to work in a team-oriented environment.

Digital Literacy Skills

  1. Information literacy

This is the ability to determine when new information is needed, as well as the ability to locate the information, evaluate its validity and then use it effectively to understand an issue or solve a problem.

  1. Media literacy

This involves the ability to assess the information produced by different types of media for its truth value. Being media literate means a person can detect propaganda, censorship and bias in media information and the motivations behind these distortions.

  1. Information technology

Information technology covers a broad range of activities. Generally, it describes any entity that stores, retrieves, manipulates, or receives information electronically in a digital format. This covers everything related to computer technology and to areas such as robotics. The skills required to work in this area are considered hard skills: learned abilities that can be quantified.

Career Skills

  1. Leadership

Not everyone will be in a leadership position, but the kinds of skills leaders require will be highly valued by employers. These are skills that relate to decision making, managing and resolving conflict, delegating, giving clear and useful feedback, and project and task management.

  1. A solid work ethic

People with a strong work ethic are motivated, dependable, persistent, and resilient. They meet deadlines. They have a positive attitude and are results oriented. They focus on how to overcome obstacles rather than being overcome by them. They work to continually improve their skills and performance.

  1. Organizational and time management skills

When companies are always trying to do more with less – and do it more efficiently – they value employees with good time management skills. These are skills that involve prioritizing tasks, allocating time, planning, setting goals and creating strategies to meet them, and reviewing performance in order to determine how to improve it.

Whether you’ve been laid off in 2020 or are thinking of broadening your job and career horizons in 2021, the recruiters here at Helpmates are here for you. If you haven’t already, check out or current job opportunities and/or contact the branch nearest you to register with us.

Here’s to a happy 2021 for all of us!!!

Talkin’ ‘Bout Those Transferable Skills

You may be dissatisfied with your current career and looking to make a change. It’s a big decision, enough to put a few butterflies in the stomach of the most unflappable person, especially is you’re worried about how your current job skills will – or won’t – transfer. How do you get started, and what do you need to do? Here are a few tips.

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  1. Reflect

The first step is to examine your motivations. Why exactly do you want to make a switch? Are your reasons compelling enough to warrant such a big change in your life? For example, you may be dissatisfied with your current job because of a bad boss or work environment, or lack of growth opportunities in your current job. These problems can often be addressed without launching into a new career.

Think about the aspects of your job that you find most and least satisfying. Would your new career increase your job satisfaction where it is lacking now? What are you most passionate about, and will the new career allow you to fulfill your passion? Finally, how are you situated financially as you make the transition?

  1. Research

You need to do a lot of this. First, you need to find out as much as you can about your new career. You may have a pretty good idea about what it involves, but you need to get into the weeds and learn about what it is really like to do the job.

These days, there is no lack of resources to help you do this. You can look at journals and books or check out the many different resources online. Websites such as LinkedIn and Glassdoor are invaluable resources to make connections with people who work in your prospective career. Pick their brains for information about the job and ideas for making the transition.

You will also need to find out if you will need additional training to prepare you for entry into your new career.

Research for the job search

The next step is preparing for the job search. You will need to put together a resume and cover letter and update your LinkedIn profile. You will need to research companies you might like to work for and find out which ones you want to target in your job search.

You will need to network with friends, colleagues, contacts on social media, and through informational interviews to gain the attention of your target company. And you will need to prepare for the job interview itself.

  1. Transferable skills

To make your case to a hiring manager and persuade him or her that you have what it takes to do the job, you need to show how the skills you have developed in your previous jobs are transferable to the one you are seeking. You may see little connection between the skills you have and the skills you need, but there probably are a number of skills you have developed that any employer would want.

Some examples of these transferable skills include communication skills, leadership skills, research and analytical skills, organization and time management skills, collaboration skills, numeracy and information technology skills.

What you need to do is show the employer how you used these skills at your previous jobs to achieve your goals, and how they will enable you to excel at your new job. Giving examples of transferable skills will help to show the employer that you are the right person for the job.

And there’s good news: all employers are looking for these kinds of skills, because they’re necessary for almost all types of jobs.

Are you ready to put your current skills to work in a new job? Take a look at our current opportunities and then either follow the posting’s application directions or contact the Helpmates branch office nearest you to register with us.

The Absolutely, Positively Right Way to Leave a Job

You are at a point where you are giving serious consideration to leaving your job. It could be that the job no longer challenges you, that it has become routine. Or you’ve hit a dead end – there is no avenue for advancement. Or you simply cannot get along with your supervisor. Or you’re just burned out.

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Whatever the reason, there’s definitely a right way and a wrong way to quit your job. Here is the right way to do it.

  1. Think carefully

The first step is to think about why you want to quit. All of the reasons listed above are valid. But there are others that are a bit shakier. If you’re angry about being chastised by your supervisor or colleague or because you were passed over for a certain project, these are not good reasons to leave your job. Take a little time to cool off before you make any rash decisions that you might regret later.

Consider if there are alternatives to leaving your job, such as transferring to another department or asking for more responsibility, or working out problems with a coworker.

Also, career counselors advise having another job lined up before leaving your current position. It is much more difficult to find work when you are unemployed because this still carries a stigma with employers.

  1. Letter of resignation

Because of its purpose, the language used in this document should be more formal. You should use the full name and title of your supervisor.

Your resignation letter doesn’t have to be long. It should state your intention to leave, when your last day will be, your reason for leaving, and an expression of appreciation for the opportunity to work at the company. You could also include a few positive remarks about your experience.

  1. Giving notice

This should be done face-to-face, not through email. It is customary to give two weeks’ notice, but this can vary. Your supervisor may ask you to stay longer for various reasons. If this is the case, you should agree to the extended period to maintain a positive relationship. You don’t want to burn any bridges. It’s also possible that you may be asked to leave immediately, so you need to be ready for this. You should also suggest a transition plan for transferring your assignments.

What you don’t want to do is give vent to any vindictiveness over your frustrations about the job or interactions with other people at the company. This will accomplish nothing. You also want to maintain good relationships at the company.

After you have given notice in person, then submit your letter of resignation.

  1. Odds and ends

Make a list of the tasks you need to take care of before you go. This includes things such as cleaning out your files, finishing up any outstanding assignments, and so on.

Delete all personal information on your computer. You should do this before giving notice in case you are asked to leave immediately.

Put together notes covering all of your duties and responsibilities, as well as the status of your current projects and any background information needed to complete them if you are unable to. Get contact information from your coworkers.

  1. Do good work

It may be difficult to concentrate during the final weeks or days you are still at the company. But you need to maintain your professionalism, and that means continuing to turn in the best work you can. This will certainly leave a good impression on your supervisor and coworkers.

Wondering if there’s a better job opportunity waiting for you? Check out Helpmates’ job opportunities. If you see one or more that look interesting, either contact the office nearest you, or follow the posting’s application instructions.

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