When Your Candidate Receives a Counteroffer

With the job market as tight as it is now, employers need to adapt their hiring strategies to a new reality. One challenge employers face when attempting to hire new talent is dealing with counteroffers from their current employer, an entity no doubt anxious to hold on to their good performers.

Long Beach Recruiters

If you are a hiring manager, you can no longer assume that once you have made an offer and the candidate has accepted it, you have sealed the deal. That is why you need to discuss the possibility of a counteroffer with the candidate at some point.

Counteroffers usually are not something job candidates think about, and so are not well prepared to deal with them. Often, they are flattered that their employer is trying to keep them. They may give the offer serious consideration. After all, they can return to a job they do well and even earn more money doing it, as opposed to moving into a new and uncertain situation.

Your job as a potential employer is to help give them a clearer perspective because, once you examine counteroffers in more detail, they turn out to be more problematic than may appear at first sight.

The first thing the candidate needs to remember is why he decided to leave his job in the first place. It could have been because of a lack of recognition, because the job was no longer challenging, because there was no room for professional growth, or because of differences with a supervisor or coworker. Whatever the reason, the same conditions will still be there if he decides to return.

Another issue the candidate needs to consider is his status at his current company if he returns. It won’t be the same as before – he has attempted to jump ship, and that may change how he is viewed by the management. They know the person was not happy working at the company and eager to escape, and, as a result, may question the person’s loyalty and work ethic if he returns.

Also, it is possible that the former employer is making a counteroffer simply as a stopgap measure until it can find someone else to fill the position – someone more loyal to the company.

And, finally, as a potential employer you need to raise another issue – why did your candidate have to tell his supervisor he was leaving in order to prod the supervisor to increase his salary?

If the person returns, he may always be looked at with some suspicion. If he takes time off, managers will wonder if he is out interviewing at other places. The company may even begin to seriously look at potential replacements because of the possibility that he may decide to bolt again at the first opportunity.

The bottom line is that accepting a counteroffer usually is a bad idea. Studies have verified this, showing that those who do accept them generally end up leaving the company after a relatively short period of time. Bring this information to the attention of the job candidate, getting the person to look not just at the offer itself, but at the implications of that offer down the road.

As a potential employer, you can improve your position with a candidate by bringing up these issues in advance and making the person aware of the downsides of a counteroffer. Doing this, in addition to pointing out the positive things about the job you are offering, will help you land the talent you need.

Speaking of finding talent, contact Helpmates when you need help finding qualified workers for your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities. Contact the branch nearest you today.

Strengthening Your Nutraceutical Workforce Recruitment

The way your nutraceutical company manages your temporary workforce has a massive impact on your bottom line. Your staffing needs are unique in that your GMP and SOP practices must be met to the absolute letter by your workers. So ensuring that your temporary workforce has the skills, background and training is paramount.

Los Angeles nutraceutical staffing

Use Helpmates As Your Competitive Edge!

When you change your temporary workforce provider to one who knows the nutraceutical industry well you will see a large, positive effect on attracting top temporary talent, retaining them, all while managing costs and risks. Which results in a healthier bottom line overall.

Reliable and Strategic Nutraceutical Staffing Services

The staffing recruiters here at Helpmates have considerable experience recruiting for the nutraceutical industry. Just some of the ways we take nutraceutical recruiting to the next level include:

  • We specifically look for associates who have experience in the nutraceutical industry.
  • If these candidates are in short supply, we look for those who have fast food service experience (they are comfortable working on an assembly line) or in pharmaceutical production. Even those who have worked in an automated retail distribution center environment are good candidates for a nutraceutical environment.
  • We created a customized course of more than 30 training videotapes that our associates watch before they go on assignment as well as during their assignment. These tapes:
    • Provide our associates with an overview of their role on assignment and their tasks.
    • Get them up to speed as to expectations regarding how critical cleanliness is/what to do if their work clothes become soiled, etc.
    • Instruct them in the definitions of important terms (such as SOP and GMP), and so on.

Thorough Assignment Training

So comprehensive is our pre- and post-placement training that our clients have told us they really don’t need to do any additional preparation of lower level associates such as packers. Associates in more skilled positions, such as quality control technicians, do need – and receive – additional training from our clients. Yet we make sure that all of those we recruit for the nutraceutical industry understand from the get-go how critical adhering to all SOPs is and what to their assignments entail, allowing them to understand exactly what is expected of them from day one onwards.

Nutraceutical Positions for Which We Recruit

Helpmates can help find you workers for your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities in positions such as:

  • Packers
  • Parts-washers
  • Sanitation workers
  • Machine operators
  • Blenders/mixers
  • Granulation workers
  • Quality control technicians
  • Inspectors
  • R&D technicians
  • Administrative assistants
  • Accountants
  • Planners
  • Purchasers
  • And more

Strategic Recruiting for Agility and Reliability

If your current recruiting processes are causing poor operating performance, high turnover in your workforce and low employee engagement, let the experienced nutraceutical recruiters at Helpmates help you attract the best in industry talent, helping you realize more profits with an efficient, low-turnover recruiting process.

Contact the Helpmates nearest you today.

Getting Ready for Generation Z

Talkin’ ‘bout their generation…and we don’t mean millennials.  Now it’s time to discuss Generation Z, those born between about 1995 and 2010. These young adults – the oldest of whom will turn 24 this year – are coming to your workplace. Are you ready for them?

They are, in fact, probably already working for you:

In addition, due to high levels of student loan debt, many members of Gen Z are opting out of going to college: they’ll be knocking at your company’s door right after high school. (Which means now, by the way.)

Fullerton staffing agency

Here are some important statistics regarding Generation Z:

  • There about 61 million members of this generation in the U.S., more than Gen X (but fewer than millennials, which numbered 71 million in 2016).
  • They may be a bit more difficult to train and manage since they don’t have the social interaction skills of older generations.
  • They pretty much can’t remember life without smartphone and the Internet. They also don’t have personal memories of 9/11.
  • Studies show that this generation wants to learn and work hard. They’re also seekers of truth, value individual expression and tend to avoid labels.
  • They are eager to improve the world and solve conflicts.
  • They’ve seen their parents and grandparents struggle through the Great Recession and have seen a good portion of older brothers and sisters (or themselves) struggle with student loan debt. So it’s expected that this generation will try to stay away from debt. In fact, a survey by the Center for Generational Kinetics recently found that this generation plans to start saving for retirement in their 20s. Some have already started putting money away in their teens.

What This Could Mean for Your Workplace and Recruiting Strategies

Understand that this generation could make up as much as 20 percent of the labor force by 2021 (just two years away), so it’s probably wise to think ahead and discover how  to make  this generation feel valued and welcome at your company.

  • Make sure your company stays on top of the latest technology: your Gen Z new hires will expect it. Remember, they are true digital natives – even more so than younger millennials. If your company isn’t on top of all things tech, these savvy young adults will move on to companies that do.
  • Provide work space that allows for cooperation (open workspaces) as well as privacy. Members of Gen Z don’t mind working alone (and often prefer it) and so a quiet space that gives them the opportunity to work by themselves when needed is a plus. But open space that encourages collaborative work also helps them learn to work in teams.
  • Gen Z’s job candidates expect a really good candidate experience. They are not as willing to put up with a poor one as older generations are. Make your application process as effortless and efficient as possible.
  • This generation is very attracted to inclusion and diversity. (It is, after all, the most diverse generation workforce ever.) An inclusive and diverse company will have a leg up over companies that are less so when it comes to attracting this generation.
  • Gen Z’s members want to do a variety of things, even in just “one” job. So if you can offer shadowing, learning and other development opportunities, you have a better chance of becoming this generation’s employer of choice.

Need some help recruiting Generation Z to your company? Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more about how we can help source, vet and place these young workers in your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire job opportunities.

How Much Social Media Use at Work is Too Much?

You know your employees visit their personal social media channels at work: they use either their company-supplied computer or their own mobile devices.

But from an HR or management standpoint, how much is too much? Should they look at it just on their break time? Only on their own devices?

Brea staffing agency

Now that it’s 2019 and we’re well into the world of social connectivity and media 24/7, chances are great your company and/or department already has guidelines and policies in place regarding social media usage. But there always are loopholes or guidelines/rules that just aren’t clear.

In general, if employee productivity isn’t being affected, there’s probably no need to curtail social media usage, so long as employees are following your company’s social media policy. (We’re assuming here that you have one.)

We understand that chances are good only one, two or just a few employees appear to be social obsessed, so in those cases it’s best to look at usage individually, again with an eye toward how tweeting, scrolling on Instagram and pinning on Pinterest affects – or doesn’t – each employee’s performance.

  • Generally, if it appears that social use is affecting someone’s work results and productivity, it needs to be addressed,  but not necessarily in “I see you’re on social media a lot and it’s affecting your work,” because chances are another employee is on social media just as much…but is still productive.

If that’s the case, the issue is productivity/quality of work for a particular employee and not his or her social media use, per se. Focus on the issue of productivity and ask the employee what he or she can do to be more productive/focus more.

  • If visitors to your office notice the social use, that’s something that you can – and should – address, because if you know they’ve noticed it, it’s because they mentioned it and if they’ve mentioned it chances are great that they don’t like what they are seeing.
  • Does it appear that the person is on social All. The. Time? And therefore you’re wondering how could he possibly be truly focused on work? Any manager/supervisor would wonder. This would be a time to pay more attention to not only the employee’s productivity but the quality of work he delivers.

If you do find that most of your team members seem to spend an inordinate amount of time on social media, one suggestion is to hold a meeting and mention that while productivity and work product appears to be fine, it also feels as if too many people are on social media too much.

Let your team members know that you are not judging and ask them to estimate how much time they spend on social in a day and add it up. Let’s say the amount is about three hours a day for each person. Subtracting 15 minute breaks in the morning and afternoon, the lunch period and work “lulls” that happen frequently during the day, ask them if “spending 90 minutes a day on social media when we’re not at lunch or on break is the best use of our time?”

Then, as a team, come up with solutions to lessening the amount of time spent on social media.

And, by the way, even if your team doesn’t feel that 90 minutes on social a day on the clock isn’t too much time, it’s fine – as the boss – to say it is.

When you need talented workers for a day or a year in Los Angeles and Orange counties, contact Helpmates. We can provide terrific folks for temporary, temp-to-hire and direct hire needs you have. Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Getting More Commitment from Temporary Staff

Temporary workers on assignment at your company…leave. After all, it’s right in their description: they are “temporary.” So why should they even expect any type of commitment from you? And why should you expect any commitment from  them?

Torrance staffing

Excellent questions! But here are better ones: why shouldn’t you provide them more commitment (albeit temporarily). Why shouldn’t they be more committed to you?

Sometimes referred to as “external workers,” many HR professionals believe it’s critical to “align” external workers to a business’ goals. In addition, according to a recent survey by the Society of Human Resourcees Professionals (SHRM) and SAP SuccessFactors, even more HR pros think that engaging temporary workers would have a terrific and positive effect on their organizations.

They are, of course, right.

That said, here are some strategies and attitudes your company can try to get more commitment from your temporary workforce (without entering the bugaboo of co-employment).

  • Offer training.

Yes, they’ll leave with the new skills or education without “paying” for it and you will lose the benefit of their new abilities going forward, but providing such a great perk can make you an employer of choice in your region’s temporary marketplace. Word does get around, after all, and you soon enough could see temporaries eager to take on assignments at your company, rather than your competitors’.

After all, in a Los Angeles/Orange County region where temporary workers are willing to drive long distances in order to receive a higher minimum wage, becoming the company that helps them learn new skills could come to be a game changer for you when it comes to attracting top temporary talent.

  • Respect – really respect – temporary workers’ contributions.

Your company says it wants an engaged workforce, but are you walking your talk? If you consider external workers as “just temps,” you’re effectively saying they are second-class in your eyes.

And don’t think your temporary team members don’t notice: they definitely see when they’re excluded from the pizza party, when they don’t get the free movie passes after their department exceeds goals for the month, and so on. They may “say” they understand. But, really? Really!!?

  • From a “self interest” standpoint: many temporary workers work with the public….

…don’t you want them to come across as proud of their place of employment, invested in providing terrific customer service, etc.? Do you really want to run the risk of one of your external staff having no problem saying “I’m a temp and I can’t help you with this”?

How much better would it be your temporary team members were equally as invested in the customer experience as your regular employees? And how difficult would it be – truly – to help them become as invested in your success?

Are you going to have to be careful regarding co-employment issues? Of course! But that’s where Helpmates comes in: we will work with you and our temporary staff members to keep them invested in your company while helping you avoid less-than-obvious co-employment complications. Contact the Helpmates’ location nearest you for more information.

Lying Liars Who Lie….On Their Resume

When it comes to our jobs and careers, just about all of us are liars: more than four-fifths of us (85 percent) lie on our resumes. (And that number – from 2017 – is a big increase: just 66 percent of job applicants lied on resumes or applications in 2012.)

Still, just because just about everyone does it doesn’t mean you as a recruiter or hiring manager want to hire a liar. So we’ve put together a quick primer on the ways people fudge/lie/exaggerate on their resumes and how to spot them when they do.

Long Beach temp agency

  • Degrees earned. Most people don’t outright lie that they have a certain degree. Instead, they hide it a bit, saying they have “a bachelor’s” rather than specifying if it’s bachelor of science or a bachelor of arts degree.
  • We see this a lot: a person who worked at a big-name company on an assignment via a staffing firm will leave out the temp agency’s name: “Administrative Assistant, Mazda,” for example.
  • Funny or odd job descriptions. This usually occurs when someone wants to exaggerate his or her work history. Perhaps an office assistant is but one in an office and so she pretty much does manage the office, so she puts as her title “office manager.”
  • Big jumps in job titles in short periods of time. Does someone move from forklift operator to warehouse manager from just one job to the next? As mentioned above, this could be the case that the operator worked in a very small warehouse and sometimes performed “management” duties when his boss asked him to.

Most people are just exaggerating a bit.

Keep in mind that most candidates aren’t out to out-and-out lie, but to make themselves look better to potential employers. Call them white lies, a bit of boasting, teeny exaggerations. This can be particularly the case when someone did, indeed, frequently perform higher-level duties and skills in a lower-level position and wants to showcase that he/she does have the experience to move up.

Outright scamming almost always isn’t on their agenda. They just want what they perceive to be a leg up to a better opportunity. Naturally, it’s entirely up to you to decide how you will “handle” such fabrications/exaggerations when you discover them.

As for the few and far between candidates who are hoping to pull a large fast one on an employer? Here are some ways you can check out inconsistencies in a resume/cover letter – and keep from hiring those who created the documents in question.

  • Take a look at LinkedIn profiles. Most people know that former and current managers and colleagues can look at their profiles; they therefore tend to keep their work history, skills, educational accomplishments, etc. on the up and up.
  • Get details during a preliminary phone/screening interview. Make some notes about the things that seem out of kilter to you before chatting. Most of us feel more comfortable boasting or fibbing when not face-to-face or speaking to someone in real life (Hello, social media trolls!). Yet we tend to become pretty darn truthful when asked directly about them when a live person asks them over the phone.
  • Double check with candidate references and get creative about talking to people not listed on a reference sheet. Most of us are smart and only ask people who are going to give us terrific references to act as such for us. So once you chat with the listed references on a candidate’s list, head back to LinkedIn and check for a candidate’s former colleagues and managers who weren’t asked to be references. Contact them and ask about the discrepancies or “flags” you’ve noticed on a cover letter/resume, or even during the job interview.

Let Helpmates screen resumes, check references and hold preliminary interviews for you. Whether you’re looking to hire someone directly, need someone for a long- or short-term assignment, or you want to try a candidate out in a temp-to-hire arrangement, we can screen, interview and conduct background checks on one or dozens of applicants.

Contact the branch office nearest you to learn more.

How California’s Statewide Minimum Wage Hike is Affecting Your Temporary Workforce

It’s not news to the region’s employers that the minimum wage for California businesses with more than 26 employees increased statewide from $11/hour to $12/hour on January 1.

What’s more, Los Angeles County will be raising its minimum wage on July 1, from $13.25/hour to $14.25/hour.

What this means is that temporary workers taking assignments in Los Angeles County will be making more than $2 more an hour by mid-summer than if they were to take assignments in Orange County, where the minimum wage will remain $12/hour.

Brea staffing agency

We believe that employers in Orange County within a “reasonable” distance from Los Angeles County will lose out on top temporary workers unless they are willing to at least meet the higher minimum wages.

We’ve found that driving 60 minutes or more to make $2 or even “just” $1.25 more an hour is quite attractive to temporary workers. Long commutes are a way of life here in our region, and even taking a trip from the coast to the San Bernardino Mountains for a day is considered pretty much “nothing” to many of your friends and neighbors. (We know you agree with us, but in case you need proof…..)

Workers Making More than – But Near – Minimum Wage Also Expect a Hike

We’ve also seen that temporary workers who earned $2 or possibly as much as $3 more an hour than minimum wage before this year’s hike also expect to see an increase. If not, they will leave. So if an employer was paying a forklift driver $14/hour in December, that driver is expecting a raise to at least $15.

This expectation is particularly acute among lower-wage hourly workers (particularly those working in light industrial environments) on extended assignments (six-months or longer). Our administrative/professional associates, who already may have been making $18 or $20 or more an hour, haven’t been expecting a pay raise since the minimum wage hike.

We do, however, expect our administrative/professional associates to look for wage increases for their higher-than-minimum pay rates once the minimum wage reaches the $14 to $15 an hour area in the next year or so.

What This Means for Your Staffing Firm’s Billing Rates

We’ve found that our clients understand that a temporary agency’s employee cost doesn’t rise by $1/hour when the minimum wage increases by $1. We know they do because most of our client contacts work in human resources and understand well the costs involved in bringing on employees (as well as how using temporary staff can help keep an employers’ costs down considerably).

We also know they do because we’ve made a point of educating our clients months ago regarding how the past (and coming) wage hikes not only the temporary workforce’s pay expectations but also their staffing partners’ employee costs.

Bottom line on billing rates? Paying temporary workers $1/hour more does not mean you will be billed $1/hour more. Your bill rate will increase by an amount reasonable to cover our increased employee costs.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding how much to pay hourly for different skill sets and occupations, or if you’d like to start planning ahead for this summer’s wage increase so that your ability to continue to attract hard-to-come-by top talent, contact the branch manager at the Helpmates location nearest you.

2019 New Year’s Resolution: Embrace AI

Many recruiters and human resources professionals may be – to put it lightly – a tad leery regarding artificial intelligence. After all, while many experts are saying AI won’t take away our jobs, just change how we do them, we’re still wary. Should we gird ourselves for a “take over by the ‘bots”?

Our take? Embrace the techno! We believe AI won’t replace recruiters. It will, instead, make our workday lives easier. Here are just three ways how, below.

Anaheim Staffing Agency

  1. No more poring over dozens/hundreds of resumes.

Let AI do it! By allowing technology to find the relevant skills, education and background needs and then saving all of it in easily accessible (and readable) data fields, is a sourcer’s and recruiter’s dream come true. Using a resume parser can be an incredible time saver. And since too many great candidates find other employment while your hiring process lags, that’s a very good thing indeed for your desire to hire top talent. Especially as they evolve into tools that use neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) for much greater accuracy.

  1. Provide “scores” for each candidate.

AI can rate each candidate based on criteria set by a hiring manager. Artificial intelligence can crawl through resumes and even social media profiles to find this information, thus eliminating the oh-so-time-consuming resume cull. What’s more AI can perform multi-batch phone screenings, thus ridding humans of this highly stressful and somewhat tedious task.

  1. Help you predict which candidates will perform the best on the job.

Most of us show our best selves when interviewing.  And as a recruiter or hiring manager you’ve no doubt hired someone who looked great on paper and/or interviewed exceptionally well only to find them….lacking in some important aspect of their job performance or even cultural fit.

Predictive hiring analytics, however, can help identify which candidates are a best fit – and would make a better employee. This type of AI uses richer data sets and smart algorithms to highlight the candidates that best fit criteria set by hiring managers and/or recruiters.

Additional uses of predictive hiring analytics include:

  • Highlighting which requirements are associated with good performance over time.
  • When do soft skills – and which soft skills – indicate how successful a candidate will be.
  • Ascertain which job candidates are most likely to accept the job offer.
  • Screen out those candidates who are good-looking-on-paper-but-not-going-to-be-good employees.
  • More objectively use information found during reference checks and background screening.

What AI Can’t Do

Taking a look at the above tasks easily taken over by bots, what do you see? You see the preliminary, early going, screening process tasks. (And they don’t do any outreach to passive candidates!) The in-depth conversations and relationship-building during a job interview — the selling of the position — can’t be done by technology, and probably never will.

Instead, AI will take the tedium away from recruiting and allow top recruiters to do what they do best: connect with and nurture top talent.

Looking to connect with top talent today? Call upon the recruiters at Helpmates. All of our recruiters are Certified Staffing Professionals (CSP) and we pride ourselves on delivering exceptional service to both our clients and candidates, as evidenced by being named to Inavero’s Best of Staffing list for nine years in a row!

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you. We look forward to hearing from you.

Hiring Trends for 2019

Happy 2019 (soon)! As we get ready for the New Year, we thought we’d explore the next 12 months to see how they may differ from 2018 from a hiring standpoint. How will AI affect recruiting and staffing? How will candidate interviewing evolve? How will data affect sourcing?

Take a look below.

  • Talent will continue to call the shots.

If you think finding great people is going to get any easier next year, keep your sourcing and networking skills sharp because the economy is expected to continue to grow throughout the year  and so the hot candidate market is expected to continue apace. In other words, as it stands now, employers/recruiters don’t pick candidates, they choose you. And that state of affairs is expected to continue throughout the coming year.

Torrance staffing

Many recruiters and employers have started treating candidates more like customers. Which means hiring this coming year will mean using even more marketing tactics in recruiting so that you attract, convert and retain your customers candidates.

In other words, you’re going to continue to be exceptionally nice to candidates (as you’ve always been, of course!) and you’re going to continue building solid relationships with them. You want to continue to be their BFF throughout the recruitment process and beyond.

  • Speaking of BFFs, say hello to your new best friend, AI.

Many recruiters worry that artificial intelligence will take sourcing/recruiting jobs away, and while it may take the really tedious aspects of the recruitment process from off humans’ hands (tasks such as screening resumes and scheduling interviews, for example), it actually will make recruiters’ lives better and more enjoyable, allowing them to do the things they entered the field to do: to connect great people with their employer (and for independent recruiters/staffing firms, other great companies).

AI also will help recruiters and hiring managers improve quality of hire, because AI uses data that standardizes the matching of a candidate’s experience, skills and knowledge to a job’s requirements, thus helping match the right person to the right job, resulting in more productive and happier employees. You know, the types that tend to stick around for the long term.

In addition, LinkedIn’s Global Recruiting Trends Report 2018 predicts that AI also will remove human bias in hiring and save employers money.

  • Job interviews may become more like auditions and it’s possible we’ll start to say goodbye to the paper resume.

As more and more employers start placing more and more importance on “technical” skills, employers may start asking job candidates to perform aspects of the job during the interview, an audition of sorts. (Marketers may be asked to create a marketing plan while coders may be asked to create some code, for example.)

Meanwhile,  because companies also are looking for soft skills in addition to technical acumen, a candidate’s social media profile or a video submission may provide an accurate first impression more accurately  than the traditional “paper” resume.

(Job seekers take note: it may be necessary to create digital portfolios, your own website, etc. And make sure to clean up your social media profiles!)

What about you? What hiring/recruiting trends do you see making stronger footholds next year? Let us know by contacting the Helpmates branch nearest you. We’d be happy to offer tips/best practices on how to recruit top talent in 2019 and beyond.

Help Your Team Members Stay Excited About Work

As a supervisor, a big part of your job is to ensure that your team members stay excited about work….but without working so hard and so fast that they become burnt out:

Santa Fe Springs Staffing

  • Your newly hired college grad is so excited about her first job in a career she loves that she’s willing to work 10 or 12 hours a day and on weekends because “it’s not work; it’s fun!” .
  • Your department has just been tasked with an exciting new initiative, one that will be a game changer for your company; perhaps even for humankind. Everyone – absolutely everyone – on your team is extremely excited and also happy to work through lunch, work until 8 p.m., volunteer to work on weekends, and so on.

And then it happens: in a few weeks or (more likely) a few months of nonstop high engagement and toil, you notice your team members:

  • No longer are excited.
  • Don’t automatically volunteer to stay late or work weekends and if “volunteered” by you, they look dejected and let you know quickly that they’ve already made plans.
  • Start becoming sick more often. Possibly a lot more often.
  • Stop meeting deadlines.
  • Are becoming cranky and snappish.

This, of course, is natural: the human body can only take so much adrenalin and employees always pumped, always “on,” always moving at time and a half and you can rest assured that that adrenalin is pumping. A lot! Workers they will become sick and possibly seriously so. At the very least they will have more colds/fevers, head and back aches, become “testy,” experience insomnia, and a host of other ailments, all that indicate burnout.

Ensuring employees stay excited…enough.

Remember when an employee, when asked to work over the weekend, mentioned she had plans and couldn’t come in? How it surprised you, because she’d happily worked after hours/weekends for several months. Taking that time off is what she should have been doing all along and it was your job as her supervisor to make sure she did so, whether she wanted to at the time or not.

Making sure workers work no more than 40 or 45 hours a week helps ensure that they do their best work possible: they are rested, recharged. They have a much better chance of staying healthy. They will remain excited and interested in coming to work. They will, in short, be more productive by taking time off regularly.

So when your eager beavers tell you they want to stay late and work weekends, tell them no. It’s not possible. You won’t allow it. You’ll end up doing both of you a favor!

If one of the reasons you would like your team members to work longer hours is because of a major project or you’re short staffed, call upon Helpmates to fill the gap in the workload to help your team get it all done. You’ll be a hero and will demonstrate to your team that you’re serious about their well-being. We look forward to hearing from you.

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