The Bottom-Line Benefits of Becoming a Fully Remote Company

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, many people began working remotely to avoid becoming infected with the virus. They did it out of necessity. But companies and workers are seeing that working remotely has a number of advantages in addition to keeping healthy – benefits that can help to boost the bottom line.

La Mirada staffing

One study found that companies can save as much as $11,000 a year per employee by allowing them to work from home half of the time. Here are a few more advantages for businesses from transitioning to a remote workforce.

  1. Saving on overhead

If you have a workforce that is fully remote, there is no need for a brick-and-mortar building. That is a huge savings in itself. You also save on all of the associated costs of having a building – utilities, rent, maintenance, and parking, to name a few.

You also don’t have to worry about furniture, desks, and computers.

  1. Fewer absences

Working at home offers employees greater flexibility to take care of personal matters without having to take off from work. If a worker needs to attend an event at his or her child’s school, for example, he or she can go to the event, return home – and possibly work beyond “normal” work hours – without having to ask for a half-day off from work.

If a worker has a mild illness, a cold for example, they are more likely to get work done at home, rather than taking time off from work out of fear of spreading the illness to coworkers.

  1. Greater productivity

Research has shown that employees who work remotely are more productive than those who work at the office. They don’t have to take the time for a morning and evening commute. They don’t have to deal with the interruptions that are common to office workplaces.

People working remotely usually work longer hours than those who work in an office, and they enjoy the work more. Because they have greater flexibility and freedom, they are happier in their work, and this positive outlook increases productivity. One study has found that happy workers are 13 percent more productive than those who are not.

  1. Less turnover

Lower employee turnover is another fringe benefit of having a more satisfied workforce. Because those who work remotely are happier in their jobs, they tend to stay in them longer.

This can save a company a lot of money. Hiring new people is expensive, as much as $4,000 per person. Plus, there is the time involved. You need to advertise jobs, review applications, schedule interviews, and onboard the new people, along with any other training that is needed.

Moreover, higher turnover can have a big impact on productivity. When people leave, projects are interrupted. New people need to brought up to speed on what is being done.

Managers also like remote workers: 79 percent of them in a 2019 survey said that remote it’s a great “non-monetary” way to retain employees. Moreover, remote workers say they are more likely to stay with their current companies than people who do not work remotely.

Humans are social creatures and about six months into a lot of remote working,  some employees are saying they look forward to returning to the office,  at least part-time. But most are saying they don’t want to return full time.

The next few months will really show how  much your workers do – or don’t – want to work from home but if you’re wondering if a fully remote workforce is the right move for you, there definitely some financial benefits to it.

Whether you decide to keep everyone working remotely or you want them to return to the office full time, the recruiters at Helpmates can help you source, vet and place terrific workers. Contact the Helpmates branch office nearest you for more information.

Overcoming the Overwhelm When Working at Home

The pandemic has caused a lot of upheaval in people’s lives. Many of us now work remotely, all the while trying to take precautions against the virus. We battle with a lot of anxiety and stress and even some disorientation. It’s a lot to get used to.

Whittier careers

Working from home also presents unique challenges. We need to overcome distractions from family and friends. Work time tends to bleed into personal and family time until it often feels like there is no boundary between the two. It is easy to feel that we’ve lost control.

If you are feeling overwhelmed, you need to examine the sources of stress in your life. Here are a few things you can do to cope, and here are even more tips.

  • Take breaks

When working, it is best to take a short break about once each hour. That is about the limit of time that our minds can focus intensely. If that doesn’t suit your routine, you should definitely take a break when you are feeling stressed or fatigued.

Do something physical during your break, such as taking a short walk, doing some quick callisthenic-type exercises, throwing some dirty laundry in the washer, or cutting up some vegetables for supper. This helps to get the blood flowing, delivering more oxygen to the brain, improving your mood and reducing stress.

  • Set benchmarks

Most of us procrastinate, at least some of the time. If a big project is due in two weeks, we wait until a week or so has gone by before starting to work on it. To eliminate this problem, try setting benchmark goals. Break down the project into smaller tasks and set deadlines for each of  them on the way to your final goal.

  • Don’t be too hard on yourself

We all make mistakes. When we do, often there is a feeling of embarrassment and inadequacy, especially among perfectionists. We scold ourselves for our poor performance and become angry and depressed. If you screw up, forgive yourself. Don’t take it too hard. Realize that everyone makes mistakes and experiences failure. Treat it as a learning experience and move on.

  • Make time for you

No matter how busy you are or what you have on your plate, you need to take care of yourself. If you don’t, your performance and productivity will suffer in the long run. Take time to exercise every day. Eat a healthy diet. Get seven to eight hours of sleep. Take time to interact with family and friends. You’ll feel better, have more energy and get more done. You may even want to try meditation. Research has shown that it can help you focus and lessen stress.

  • Reduce the “modern” type of “clutter”

If you stop and take the time to notice, you will be surprised at the amount of time wasted each day on frivolous activities. For example, how often do you check your email, Facebook, texts and Instagram? How much time do you spend reading blogs or diddling around YouTube?

These are time sinks. If you want to get more control of your life, cut back on the amount of time you waste on these activities.

  • Remember your purpose.

When things get chaotic and stressful, it’s easy to lose sight of the forest for the trees. Remember why you chose this profession and this job in the first place and the things you want to accomplish in your career. Look at your current situation as a step along the way.

  • Get organized

Believe it or not, just looking at a cluttered desk can increase your stress level. Studies have shown that people who are better organized are more productive and not as stressed out.

Is your current employer asking you to work from home 24/7? Sensing that your boss truly is asking too much and it’s time to find another position? Check out our current job opportunities and, if you find one or more of interest, follow application instructions.

E-mailing Passive Candidates in the Age of AI

If you’re a recruiter trying to catch the attention of a passive job candidate, you may feel like Sisyphus of ancient Greek mythology – the man who was doomed to forever push a large rock up a hill, only to have it roll back down again.

Buena Park staffing

In other words, you may feel that it’s an exercise in futility. And – no doubt about it – catching the eye of passive job candidates is tough: they are inundated with emails of all types. Yours is simply one more that clutters up their inbox, especially if they don’t have any interest in leaving their current place of employment.

But don’t give up hope. All is not lost. You can get their attention. It’s all in the approach.

  • Out with the old, in with the new

If you have email templates that you have been using for years, now is the time to get rid of them. They are most likely outdated and do not address the concerns and attitudes that passive candidates have today.

  • Be honest and sincere

Try to put yourself in the place of the candidate. What kind of approach would you appreciate the most? It probably is one that is simple, clear, and direct.

You want the email to be professional, but not too stiff or formal. Nor do you want to be overly familiar, avoiding a back-slapping kind of approach. A straightforward, authentic approach works best. You don’t want to use any gimmicks or any kind of sales pitch. Avoid redundancy or filler. Each line should carry its weight in getting the message across.

Read the email aloud. This really helps you to get an idea of how it sounds and the impression it makes.

  • Double check for errors

The email needs to show professionalism. Check for any spelling or grammatical mistakes. Don’t use abbreviations. Check to make sure you have spelled the candidate’s name correctly.

  • Be specific

Let the person know what they have to gain from reading the email. Avoid any vague language or descriptions. Writing something like “this is a great opportunity” really doesn’t tell the person about the job. It is better to explain what makes the job worth their interest and what it has to offer, such as salary and benefits.

While you do want to put some details in the email, you also need to be careful that you don’t make it too long. It should be short and to the point, with only the most relevant information – who you are, what the job is, and why you are contacting the person. Include the title of the job and the next step for the person to take if they’re interested.

  • Do your research

You are much more likely to get a response if you contact a person about a job that fits their particular skills and experience. To ensure a job is applicable, however, you need to do some research on their background first on social media sites or professional networks.

  • Write and rewrite

Writing well takes work and time. To make your email compelling, you should first write a rough draft and then rewrite it a few times to get it just right. Quality is more important than quantity.

  • Make sure they know you’re human

We have to admit, we found this great tip in an article we read recently and unfortunately we can’t find it now. The recruiter/author said she had great success with her emails to passive candidates when she wrote in the subject line: I am a person, not a bot and I have a career opportunity that might suit you.

This approach worked for her, she said, because too many people receive to many AI-generated emails and automatically delete them. Beat the bots at their own game and declare your humanity!

We know where the good candidates hang out! Reach out to the recruiters at the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more about our staffing services.

Looking into Our Crystal Ball: Predicting the Future of Remote Work Post-Pandemic

Waaay back (in late 2019), about 7 million of us worked remotely full-time, which was about 3.2 percent of the entire workforce. In addition, about 43 percent of us worked at home at least part time.

Gardena staffing

Now, during the pandemic? Gallup in mid-March began polling people regarding working from home and reported that 39 percent of those polled said their employer offered “flex time or remote work options.” That number increased to 57 percent in polling conducted between March 30 and April 2. We wouldn’t be surprised if it’s more, now (late July, when we wrote this post).

What does the future hold? Our guess is that remote work is here to stay!

Not everyone can work from home, of course, but for those who can, it’s looking more and more as if they will want to continue doing so, at least one or two days a week. This particularly could be the case if the COVID-19 crisis remains with us for the remainder of the year and into early next. That is, the longer people get to work remotely, the more they’ll want to.

Most remote workers LOVE to work at home!

The Gallup research article linked to above mentioned that 59 percent of people polled who are working from home because of the pandemic said they’d prefer to do so as often as possible once health restrictions are lifted.

In fact, folks working from home like it so much that they told pollsters that they’d be willing to quit their current employer to find another remote position if their current company did away with remote work.

Remote workers ARE more productive

A recent survey conducted by CoSo Cloud found that 77 percent of remote workers said their productivity grew when they started working from home. (Fifty-two percent also said they were less likely to take time off.)

Some might be thinking: “Well, of course the employees will say they’re more productive! But are they really!?” Yes they are. Data are showing a 47 percent increase in employee productivity this year.

The future isn’t here yet and therefore nothing is absolutely certain…

…but it appears as if more of those employees who can work from home, will.

Gartner, for example, believes that about 48 percent of employees are “likely” to work remotely at least part-time post-pandemic, up from 30 percent before COVID-19 turned the world upside down and shook it vigorously.

Not everyone agrees, of course: other experts believe workers will return to the office. Working from home can be very lonely; therefore, according to the research firm Gensler, “only 12 percent of people want to continue to work from home full-time after the pandemic  subsides.” In addition, Gensler reports that of those who would like to work from home at least some of the time, that some of the time amounts to no more than two or three days per week. Possibly less.

Our prediction?

We believe a good number of people will continue to want to work from home full time. Whether this number is more than those who prefer to work in an office full-time will depend on how well the physical office meets their needs as well as their child care requirements and arrangements.

Still, we believe a lot more workers than before the pandemic will want at least the option to work remotely full- or part time. Savvy employers will understand that this option could well become a required employee benefit if they want to attract top talent – and what employer doesn’t want to do so?

If you’d like to offer remote work to potential employees who normally didn’t work remotely before the COVID-19 crisis (call center workers or customer service representatives, for example), contact Helpmates. We recently helped two of our call center clients move our specialists to full remote work, and we can do the same for you.

Prepare Today for the Post-COVID Hiring World

Getting to a post-COVID19 world is going to take some time. Even as we gingerly make our way to reopening our economy, California has been hit with a big increase in infections and some business restrictions have been reinstated.

But whether it takes months or a year or more, the hiring scene will return to some resemblance of how it was before the pandemic.

Santa Fe Springs recruiters

Rather than wait months to prepare for that time, it’s wise for employers to start getting ready now.

Whether you’ve put hiring on hold, are hiring more than you did before March, whether you’re planning another reduction in force, or even if you’re worried that another complete shutdown is in the offing, here are some tips to help you prepare for the days when hiring returns to some semblance of normalcy.

First, some questions to ask:

  • How has the pandemic and the shutdown changed your particular hiring process? Many people have gone to a virtual interview process, but some have not. What do you see keeping and what will you change when the pandemic is behind us?
  • You undoubtedly are reading many articles such as this one that discuss what recruiting and hiring will look like post-pandemic. From your reading and discussions with others, how do you think your talent acquisition process – your sourcing, your talent pipeline management, your onboarding steps, etc. – will need to change?

Digging deeper:

  • Look at your recruitment strategies now. If you’re currently hiring, are you attracting the right candidates now? If you’re not hiring, were you attracting the right type of person before the pandemic started? Where were the roadblocks and/or weaknesses in sourcing, interviewing and onboarding and how can you fix them?
  • Technology can certainly help you now and in the future. Do you need to upgrade your video interviewing capabilities? Should you invest in some chatbot capabilities so that you can automate answers to candidates’ typical answers, thus freeing up your recruiters’ time for more important tasks? Time to purchase some resume screening software?
  • Could your recruiters themselves use some additional training or certifications so that they’re fully acclimated to recruiting/HR technology and laws?
  • What about your recruiting policies? Have you looked at them lately? Do they need updating to reflect the changes you’ve already made – and will make?
  • Are you reaching out to passive candidates? Yes, you’re probably able to choose among the best-of-the-best unemployed candidates now. But this employer’s hiring market will Connecting with – even hiring – passive candidates now so that they’ll return your emails later is a wise move.
  • Even if you’re not hiring now, keep in touch with the unemployed professionals reaching out to you now. After all, someone who contacts you even though there’s no current job opening is someone who is assertive, a hustler. Probably someone you might want on your team someday!
  • If you’re not already staying in touch with former candidates and passive candidates, invest in some regular email outreach (newsletters). If you’ve texted in the past, keep texting now. Regular communication now – even though you may not be recruiting – will pay dividends when you are.

Good candidates will become “hard to find” again

By taking the time now to look at what is and isn’t working in your current recruiting process, changing it as needed, and continuing to communicate with candidates past, present and possibly future, your company can create a great sourcing, recruiting, onboarding, and communication process now, ensuring that you’re ready for the future.

Are you getting ready for a big hiring push in the near – or far – future? Partnering with a recruiting firm now can help make that process run smoothly and effectively when you need it.

Contact Helpmates to learn how we can help with your recruiting needs now and post-COVID19.

Moving Beyond the “Hive Mind” When Recruiting

Bees. The golden with black stripes heroes of pollination. You no doubt have heard of their “hive mind”: the coordinated behavior they appear to exhibit, all in the benefit of the hive. It’s as if the there’s a single mind controlling each bee’s behavior. This is the “hive mind.”

Santa Ana staffing company

In recruiting, a “hive mind” is one in which recruiters and hiring managers always look for people who fill a certain mold, who have certain characteristics, have the same background, see the world in the same way.

Instead, to truly compete in 2020 and beyond, we believe your organization should search for candidates who have a mind of their own, who don’t think the same way you do, who are different.

Right now is the perfect time to expand your “perfect hire” beliefs

Many – far too many – great people are now out of work and hot in their hunts for new employment, making it easy to find people who aren’t your “typical” type of candidates who nevertheless would make terrific employees. 

Beginning the reframe

Take a look at the characteristics, backgrounds and skills of current employees you believe have the best qualifications for their positions. Remember that except for specific training for technical opportunities, job requirements most often are malleable.

As you look at your best employees, don’t worry so much about specific past jobs or past education – particularly schools attended – but more about their accomplishments. Also, look at their key characteristics: are they go-getters or are they a bit reticent? Do they work best alone or in teams? Remember, you’re not looking for specific experiences but their accomplishments and the characteristics that helped them make those accomplishments.

Ascertaining what it takes to actually succeed in a role and then looking for the particular characteristics of those successful workers, helps you change your thinking as to “what kind” of candidate will succeed.

Look for candidates who overcome obstacles and talk to them about how they thought about the challenges and what they did to overcome them.

Such people tend to those have the natural ability to roll with the punches, figure out how to overcome roadblocks and apply their past experiences to figuring out how to succeed in new situations.

Focus on transferable skills and behaviors rather than specific industry experience

For example, if an administrative assistant with considerable payroll experience was able to upgrade her previous employer’s (a regional insurance company) payroll system, surely she can manage the payroll for your furniture manufacturing enterprise?

Remember: if you’re leery of such an individual’s ability to transfer from one industry to another, robust behavioral interviews that focus on the tasks pertinent to the job can help you ascertain if they’d be a good fit. After all, past behavior almost always is an accurate predictor of future behavior.

Hiring from “outside the hive” can bring your company a competitive advantage

Diverse teams of people with different backgrounds, education, skills, and work history create diverse teams, helping employees move away from “groupthink,” encouraging your business to change outdated views that no longer serve your company and move easily into the many changes that this second decade of the second millennium no doubt will bring.

What’s more, in these weeks of massive unemployment, your company would be helping someone who’s “not perfect” in the sense of specific background or industry experience find work.

Looking for great people for your Southern California company? Helpmates has terrific specialists thoroughly vetted and well-oriented in best Covid-19 workplace practices to work on assignment for you either on-site or remotely. Contact the branch location nearest you to learn more.

 

Putting Candidates at Ease During a Social-Distanced Interview

If you’re one of the many Southern California employers that are starting to bring employees back to corporate offices and other on-site locations, you may need or want to hire new employees.

Los Angeles recruiters

While many employers have decided to continue interviewing via video conferencing, you may decide you want – or need – to interview candidates in person.

This, naturally, could make some candidates nervous. After all, most people understand how contagious the virus that causes the SARS-CoV-2 disease is and may be worried they could a) be exposed to the virus or b) pass the virus on to their interviewer under the chance that they or the interviewer could have the virus but be asymptomatic (showing no symptoms).

Making the decision to interview candidates in-person. Or not.

Every employer has different needs. You may be comfortable hiring with video-only interviews, or you may have decided you really need to see someone in person to get a true “feel” for their personality. After all, it isn’t as easy to evaluate a candidate’s personality traits in a video interview as it is in a “real-life” interview.

So if you have decided to bring candidates in for in-person interviews, here are some tips to help both you and the candidate feel safe…and have a productive, positive interview experience.

  • Naturally, you’re going to have to make sure your location meets – or exceeds – the CDC’s guidelines for making sure your workplace is safe for conducting business on-site.

The CDC offers guidance to reopening business on how to ensure your facility is clean/sanitized and is configured so that workers may properly social distance while at work.

  • Offer candidates written interview guidelines so that they know what to expect.

Will you require masks? If so, what can a candidate expect if they refuse to wear one (or can’t, for medical reasons)? What are you going to do about handshakes before and after the interview? Will candidates be allowed in restrooms? Will you be providing an office/site tour? Will the candidate meet with one or more people?

The idea is that these guidelines will give candidates information about what to expect at the interview location. Providing them with the “logistics” of their interview can help alleviate concerns and help put candidates at ease.

  • If you decide to have in-person interviews, will you allow candidates to request a video interview (in case they are leery of coming in for an on-site interview)?

This is a legitimate question for at least two reasons. One, people have varying tolerance for risk and – especially if the job will performed remotely – may simply be too nervous to come to your location for an interview.

However (reason two), if the job will be performed on-site – even if only a few days a week or month – how will you decide to look at the candidate’s virtual-interview request? Is it a deal-breaker for you? If not, and you want to grant the candidate’s request for a virtual interview, you’re going to have to come to sort of agreement about working on-site with the candidate if they become your employee.

  • Give candidates clear details as to what next steps are.

Employers should do this for all interviews, pandemic or no pandemic. However, it’s especially important now due to the uncertainty about, well, everything.

For example, it’s probably a good idea to give the candidate an estimate as to when a decision may be made and that a hiring choice could take longer than usual due to current circumstances. If that’s the case, it’s a really courteous move if you encourage the candidate to feel free to reach out to you if they haven’t heard from you in some capacity within a certain number of days.

If you need workers oriented and prepared in COVID-19 best workplace safety practices, contact Helpmates’ Rosalie Villa, our chief revenue officer, at 949-225-5016 or via email at rvilla@helpmates.com.

Motivating Passive Candidates When It’s Damn Scary “Out There”

Getting passive candidates to move from their current employer to your company is difficult in the best of times; it’s exceedingly so during a pandemic. After all, even though companies are still laying off workers – or even shutting down altogether – great employees are understandably loathe to take a risk and move right now.

Fullerton recruiters

Still, it is possible to get candidates motivated enough to change employers. Here’s how:

  • Find out what means enough to them to make a move.

That is, what are the benefits, job duties, perks, career dreams, and more that mean the most to them and how can your company make sure the candidate will get them if they become your employee?

Are they looking for more PTO, flextime or continuing education opportunities (such as employer-paid graduate school)?

If moving to your firm means a promotion, how much of a promotion is it in their eyes? Is one step up the ladder not enough? Could you revamp the job so that it’s at least two steps up?

  • Be completely open and honest regarding your company’s current health.

Naturally, passive candidates are going to want to know how robust your business is before jumping ship. If ever there was a good time to be as transparent as possible, now is it. Discuss layoffs or furloughs already completed and any plans you may have for more in the future.

As candidates ask questions – and they definitely will! – make sure you’re as above board and candid as possible. If you not sure about something, say so.

Finally, if the candidate is so terrific and/or the position being filled is so critical to the company’s success, consider the option of providing the candidate with a “no layoff or furlough” promise (in writing), but only if you feel strongly that you won’t have them in the future. (You’ll want to make sure at least one attorney reads the document, of course.)

  • Understand it may take longer to woo passive candidates.

Trepidation about making a job move is more than understandable right now. Don’t be surprised if you’ll spend more time talking with candidates and encouraging/allaying fears. Schedule virtual coffee meetings. Be open to taking candidates’ “on the fly” calls, emails or texts. Let them talk about all their concerns; don’t be surprised if you answer the same questions more than once.

Depending on the position, consider having members of the C-suite engage with candidates. Ask employees who would become the candidates’ co-workers – or even subordinates – to reach out and engage with your potential new-hires.

Passive candidates often are the best workers at their current employer….

…and they understandably are leery of making a move now. Look at recruiting passive candidates as more a relationship-building exercise rather than recruiting. Let them get to know and become interested in your company and what you have to offer that their current employer does not. You probably won’t be able to go into the courtship with a “quick score” mentality and will instead need to nurture their candidacy while growing their trust and allaying their fears.

Helpmates can be your partner in your search for passive candidates for your direct-hire opportunities. Contact the branch nearest your Southern California business to learn how we attract, recruit and vet top talent.

Motivating a Remote Workforce: 4 Strategies

By the time you read this, we’ll be almost three months from the start of safe-at-home orders and also well on our way to seeing Southern California “reopen.”

Yet many companies will still be asking employees to work from home. Because their team members have been working remotely for weeks now, managers no doubt have the management part down pretty well.

But what about motivating remote workers?

The “adventure” of working from home wore off long ago. Many people also are managing young children while working and – as summer approaches – may no longer need to supervise their schoolwork, but will have to figure out how to wrangle their children during a summer with “nothing to do.”

Cypress staffing

Even your employees without children no doubt are well into the work-from-home doldrums: tired of Zoom. Tired of working from the kitchen table. Tired of not having in-person interactions. Tired of not heading out with the gang to lunch. Fed up with #doomscrolling the Internet during breaks.

Work-from-home exhaustion is a real thing. If you’ve noticed that your workers – or even yourself – are less motivated than normal, is it really any wonder?

Motivating remote workers: 4 strategies

  1. Create routines. That could mean regularly scheduled meetings.

Yes, this means yet more video meetings! But when working from home – which often means employees have a lot more flexibility as to when they get work done – having set meetings and/or check-ins truly can help provide your employees with a sense of normalcy.

Regularly scheduled meetings also help employees stay on track regarding deadlines and helps keep communication among team managers flowing.

  1. Speaking of communication, make sure you do so regularly. And possibly more often than you “normally” do.

Remote work can be quite isolating, especially if employees don’t hear from management/leadership. Make sure everyone on your team knows your priorities because doing so helps them understand the ultimate reasons for their work while helping them stay productive. What’s more – and perhaps most importantly – regular communication, whether in formal email memos or simple quick messages or even calls – reassures members of your team that their efforts are valued.

Understand that good communication needs to go both ways. Welcome messages and input from everyone, no matter where they are on the org chart. You’ll be amazed at the great insights that come from diverse perspectives. This will only help nurture better communications and help your employees achieve their goals.

  1. Set a regular “quitting time” for the day and stick to it.

No doubt you and your workers have found how “easy” it is to work just about any time of day…or night. Chances also are good you – and your employees – may find yourself working 10 or even 12 or more hours a day because you can, a true recipe for quick burnout.

Making – and keeping – set work hours helps prevent days from melding into each other and helps you and your workers have true “work time” as well as real “downtime,” delineations that have become ever more critical for optimum health and productivity.

  1. Stay positive and create a culture of support.

Forrester Research has found that workplace culture is one of the most critical parts of a successful remote work strategy because workers who feel they can be who they really are and who believe they truly are part of a supportive team are more likely to feel motivated.

Showing compassion and concern for everyone you work with while also remaining positive as their leader is absolutely the best course to follow in these unusual times.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information on our staffing/recruiting services. You also may call our corporate office at 949-752-6888.

Building a Company Culture with Remote Workers

At the risk of using a platitude that is becoming (frankly) more and more clichéd, your employees need you to be their rock more than ever in these unprecedented times.

This particularly is so if a good portion – if not all – of your workers work remotely.

But there’s the problem: how to exude empathy and provide that stability and feeling of normalcy when your employees don’t work on-site. What’s more, without this feeling of solidity, is your entire company culture at risk? How can employees feel “a part of something larger than themselves” when their day-to-day lives are spent mostly with just themselves?

Garden Grove staffing

Maintaining company culture with a remote workforce

  • First step: send out a memo or a website link that reminds your employees what your company’s values are.

Doing so reminds workers what your business stands for and can help them remember why they joined your firm. Seeing your business’ values in black and white also will help guide them as they move forward over the next few weeks and even months.

  • Regularly ask your employees what’s working for them as they toil remotely.

Use their feedback as a chance to learn from them and take their recommends to heart, if possible.

  • Don’t be afraid to ask every now and then if they feel less connected to your company’s mission and/or leadership.

You may want to ask these questions via private video meetings, so that workers feel comfortable speaking truthfully (and so that you can counsel them privately should they be struggling with issues of a more personal nature).

It’s also a great idea to make sure that you keep these types of two-way communications (either private or public) among workers, managers and even members of your company’s C-suite for the foreseeable future.

  • Showing kindness to everyone in your organization is key to creating a warm and motivating corporate culture.

The more your company’s leadership “show up” as sensitive, thoughtful, transparent/truthful, productive, and optimistic, the more all of your employees will “show up” the same. Everyone will remember this ethos, the acts of kindness, etc. for a long time to come and it will help all secure this type of “brand” firmly in everyone’s minds.

To help ensure that all of your stake holders (employees, managers, leadership team, investors/stock holders, perhaps even your vendors and customers) act in these ethos-building ways, they need to know what kind of behaviors you seek.

That means that you need to get input from everyone to identify the behaviors that speak the loudest to them and then let everyone know the behaviors with which they are expected to “show up.”

  • Create rituals, and stories that back up the behaviors and culture you want/expect.

Humans thrive on stories. Stories, in fact, help us become better people. They also help us connect with one another, an important factor in creating a robust, cohesive company culture.

Once again – and especially if the culture has change a bit – it’s a good idea to create a “map” with your business’ guiding principles and then distribute it to all stakeholders so that they have “directions” as to how to interact with others.

Having a strong work culture – one that is in evidence daily – helps employees feel secure when so much is up in the air.

As California continues to reopen its economy slowly, Southern California businesses may find that employees furloughed or laid off are no longer available to return to work. Helpmates has proven performers ready to work at your site or remotely for short- or long-term assignments, as well as for career opportunities. All of these individuals have been thoroughly oriented in Covid-19 workplace safe practices.

Contact Rosalie Villa, at 949-225-5016 or email her at mailto:rvilla@helpmates.com for more information. You also may reach out to the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more.

© Year Helpmates Staffing Services. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Statement | Site Map | Site Credits.