Tips for Hiring Great Temporary Specialists in SoCal

Your Los Angeles or Orange County company may need more workers as your business starts growing again as the economy continues to improve.

Yet you probably don’t really know how fast you’ll grow, in what areas you’ll grow and if you’ll be able to sustain that growth over a year or more.

Irvine staffing

Bringing on temporary specialists could be the answer.

Bringing temporary specialists in for one or a few days, or even for several weeks if not months, can help you grow your workforce as needed in the next few months…and then cut back if necessary .

Yet hiring great temporary specialists isn’t as cut and dried as simply calling up or emailing your go-to workforce management partner and discussing your current needs.

Many folks who work for staffing companies register with several staffing companies.

This is normal. After all, a specialist’s favorite recruiting firm may not have an opening for the specialist when he or she comes off from one assignment and needs another. It’s therefore savvy for folks to register with more than one staffing company.

Which means you may be competing for their services.

That’s right: many temporary specialists are extremely sought after by the staffing firms with which they’re registered. They have proven themselves to be reliable and trustworthy. Or they may have highly sought-after skills AND have proven themselves to be reliable and trustworthy. They also may have multiple offers for assignments with possibly higher hourly wages.

Our point? Our clients have found that they, too, need to stay sharp and on top of their game when it comes to hiring the best temporary specialists for their assignments!

How to beat your competition and hire the best-of-the-best.

  • Make your hiring decision quickly.

Working with a staffing agency means that their candidates are pre-screened. You know they have been vetted and pre-qualified.

When interviewing specialists sent by your staffing partner, move quickly. Have just one or no more than two people interview them. Use a qualified fit assessment to make sure they have the skills for the work and will fit in. (Consider giving this assessment tool to your staffing partner so that they can do so when they interview the specialists.)

Aim to let your staffing partner know as soon as possible whether or not you want the candidates: end of day, or the next day is best, yet no more than three days.

  • At the interview.

Be extremely clear regarding duties and expectations. Explain them again, if necessary. Make it clear that you’re happy to answer any and all questions.

If there’s a chance the assignment might lead to the specialist being hired on to your payroll, do say so, but don’t give false hope. If there’s a 50/50 chance, say so. The same goes for if there’s only a 10 percent chance. Bottom line: don’t provide false hope. It’s better to surprise someone with good news – you want to hire them – then it is to set their expectations too high.

If the assignment end date is unclear at the time of the interview, let the candidate know so. Be as honest as possible: if the assignment definitely won’t be extended, say so.

If you often provide letters of recommendation for temporary specialists, let the candidate know. The candidate isn’t your employee, of course, but letting the candidate know that you do write letters for exceptional work is a definite selling point for your position.

  • When the specialist is working on assignment.

Treat the specialist as much as possible as a regular employee. Many specialists tell us they often feel like second-class citizens and will leave an assignment before its official end if they are offered one (via another staffing firm).

Onboard the contractors as you would a regular employee (minus the employee benefits conversation, of course). Touch base with them often and provide them kudos regularly (and be sure to let the staffing firm know, as well).

Include them in small team gatherings, such as Friday pizza parties (when your employees work in person together again), and so on.

Many of our clients are starting to bring on more temporary specialists.

We have many terrific specialists in our ATS but the best ones are taken quickly. Reach out to the Helpmates branch nearest you and let us know all about your workforce needs as the economy improves.

Why Your Job Candidates Want You to Text, Not Call

Yes, it’s true: job candidates much prefer a text from a recruiter than receiving a phone call.

You probably can guess why from your own experience: a phone call is very disruptive. You don’t know if the call will take one minute of your time or 20. You don’t know if the caller is bringing bad news or good. If you don’t recognize the number, you probably think it’s a scammer, so you ignore it.

Gardena recruiters

The good news, for recruiters….

Texts have an open rate of more than 90 percent within the first three minutes of being received.

That said, here are some additional great reasons to move from a phone call to texting, at least for your first few contacts that aren’t filled with details (detailed information is best heard and understood via a phone conversation, so that the recipient can ask important questions, etc.).

  • Messaging shows candidates you value their time.

Time, even though it feels to pass so slowly during the pandemic, nevertheless feels quite precious right now. We have so much on our plates and answering a call when we don’t know how long we’ll be engaged in conversation just feels as if the caller is asking too much of us.

  • Candidates can look at the message — and reply to it – when THEY feel ready.

Answering a ringing call now feels so disruptive, as if we have to drop everything. And what if it’s bad news or we’re asked for information we don’t have. What if we don’t answer it right away? Have we lost out on some great opportunity?

But texting etiquette has evolved: We used to feel we had to answer a text within mere moments, but we now feel more and more comfortable looking at it and then replying later. This thus gives them the chance to respond in a more professional way, when they’re not in a meeting with their boss, etc.

  • Younger candidates actually feel a text is more personal.

Millennials and members of GenZ have come to think of text as more personal: after all, it’s often how they “chat” with their friends and family over the course of  a day.

This personal touch can really help a recruiter since many people think of the recruiting process as impersonal (having to jump through a website application’s hoops, for example….).

  • You can say goodbye to taking “too long” to acknowledge a candidate’s application.

A big pet peeve of job candidates is that they apply for a job and then they hear…nothing. Sure, they may receive an automatic email, but many people (younger ones particularly) barely look at email anymore and only if necessary (such as for work).

Instead, setting up an automation tool that allows you to text someone that your company has received their application is often (as mentioned above) seen as a “personal” response to their candidacy: it helps make for a much better candidate experience.

If your Southern California company needs workers for temporary, temp-to-hire and even direct-hire assignments, call the Helpmates office nearest you for information on our recruiting, staffing and placement services.

Yes, Cover Letters Still Matter: They Can Help You Get an Interview

Cover letters, so old school and completely unnecessary, right?

NO!!!

Fullerton jobs

A well-written cover letter actually can help you get the job. Why? Because it can highlight your great interest in the opportunity. More importantly, it can showcase how you can help an employer solve its problems (which, remember, is why employers hire people).

What’s more, a cover letter actually  allows you to do something that you really can’t do until you’re sitting in a job interviews:

Ask for an interview!

Without a cover letter the only thing you’re sending an employer is your resume. (Sometimes not even that, if you’re applying online and the application is a form you fill out that doesn’t ask for – or allow you to include – a resume.)

Resumes used to put in black and white your contact info, your education, your skills and the jobs you’ve had. While you should write it such that it emphasizes your successes and the things you did for employers, it’s not a document in which you can ask for an interview.

Here’s the best part: simply asking for an interview in your cover letter actually increases your chances of getting an interview!

How to ask for an interview.

Don’t forget, in the body of your cover letter you need express your great interest in what the employer does and how you think you can help the company achieve its goals.

You do so by mentioning one or two things that you’ve done in the past that show how you have the skills, knowledge and experience to do so:

  • As a line manager in the Cerritos warehouse of my employer, I made it a point to get to know my team members personally, honoring birthdays, anniversaries, children’s accomplishments and so on. My own manager told me I appeared to “make work fun” for my team. Retention numbers also back this fact up: my manager told me attrition on the line declined by 15 percent – the most of any year – after my first full year on the job.”
  • During my two years as a CSR, I’ve been commended regularly by my manager for my efficiency as well as my customer reviews. My manager particularly has commented on my calm handling angry customers.

At the end of the cover letter (your concluding paragraph), you end by asking for an interview:

  • I’m excited about this opportunity as (position) with (company) and would enjoy the chance of meeting with you to discuss it more and – more importantly – the chance to discuss my experience and skills and how I can provide value to you. Please call me at XXX-XXX-XXXX or email me at name@emailaddress.com to schedule an interview.
  • Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I would like to interview with you to discuss how my skills and background can be of service to (company) as (position). My number is XXX-XXX-XXXX and my email address is name@emailaddress.com. I look forward to hearing from you.

Are you looking for work? Take a look at our current temporary, direct-hire and temp-to-hire job opportunities. If you find one or more that look interesting, follow the listing’s directions.

Even if you don’t see anything that looks appealing, register with the Helpmates branch office nearest you: we’re constantly getting new assignments, some of which are filled before we ever have time to list them on our website.

Avoid These Recruiting Marketing Mistakes

Does your company start hiring someone only as soon as you have a need? That is, do you whip up a job posting only when a hiring manager requests a replacement or needs to fill a new position?

If so, do you find yourself scrambling to source and recruit great talent? Probably, right? And that’s certainly an unpleasant place to be, always feeling pressure to hire quickly.

Irvine recruiters

But what if your company made a habit of creating a talent pipeline? What if you always looked for people with certain skills for certain positions? And what if you created relationships with these folks so that when you do have a need, they’re eager to apply?

How would that change the caliber of your hire? Pretty darn well, actually.

Hiring “just in time” is just one recruiting mistakes you might be making. Here are three more.

  1. Not following up after a virtual recruiting event.

The COVID-19 pandemic has meant a lot of recruiting’s tasks are performed online, including recruiting events and career fairs. And even though a lot more people are out of work this year than the beginning of March last year, it’s pretty much up to you, the recruiter, to follow up with candidates.

Remembering the talent pipeline warning above, it’s smart to reach out to candidates as soon as the event is over, especially those who appear the most promising. Keeping prospective candidates engaged means you have a much better chance of hiring the best talent when you need them.

What kind of “reaching out” should you/could you perform? Why not use an automated tool to ask candidates what they thought of the event and/or your company? Text or email them to tell them about next steps (if you have immediate hiring needs). Keep in touch with everyone you met with a newsletter. (This is terrific for pipeline building, as mentioned above.) And so on.

  1. Not hiring quickly when there IS an opening.

Too many companies make the hiring process far too long. Weeks, even months long. Hiring a mid-level person should take no more than four-six weeks, tops, from the time the job is posted to when an offer is made.

So no more posting a job when it’s “under consideration.” Post it only when the hiring manager is actually ready to hire. Posting when they’re just “thinking about it,” or you and they want to fill the pipeline in this way isn’t smart: you’ll alienate candidates who wait to even hear from someone about an interview, let alone making them angry if they find out there’s no actual need right now.

Instead, work to shorten the gap between when you start accepting applications and when you make someone an offer.

  1. Not using visual content in your messaging.

As you send emails, don’t be shy about using video. Video is a great eye catcher and one of the most engaging types of content.

As you keep in touch people who have expressed interest in working at your company (whether you meet them via a networking/hiring event or they’re not hired for a job to which they applied, etc.), you should be emailing them regularly with information about your company and careers within it.

What types of videos? Videotape current employees about what they like most about working at the company. Create a “day in the life” video of people who work in certain roles. Put together an interactive quiz filled with “did you know?” facts about the company.

Partner with Helpmates for an always available talent pipeline

Helpmates continuously recruits for our clients’ changing needs. That means we always have a healthy pipeline filled with people looking for work. Contact the branch nearest you for more information for your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire staffing needs.

Real Life Virtual Networking Advice

It’s now been more than a year since the first case of COVID-19 appeared in the United States. As the pandemic drags on, most everyone has had to make major changes in how they work and live. Many now work remotely to avoid close contact with others and prevent the spread of the virus.

Whittier careers

The job search has moved online as well for those who are looking for employment. Interviews are now virtual. One important aspect of the job search is networking, and that is now largely done remotely, as well. But networking in a digital environment is not quite the same as doing it face to face.

Here are some ideas on how to network virtually.

Where to network virtually.

Some career experts advise those looking for employment to devote most of their time to networking. Job candidates need to look for events online. When you fine one to participate in, introduce yourself in the chat area, let people know what kind of job you are interested in and in what area, and share your LinkedIn address.

Another way of networking virtually is to take a class online, one that relates to your career ambitions, and then network with the people and instructor in the class. Host an online coffee break, organize regular meetings with a few other people in the class, and follow the instructor on social media.

There are also many different conferences, podcasts and workshops available online in which you can take part. Some will offer breakout sessions with smaller groups where you can make contacts with other members. On your profile for the event, be sure to use your full name and include your LinkedIn address.

Who to network with.

One place to start is with former colleagues, even if you have not been in touch with them for a while. Acknowledge the lack of contact and express the desire to reconnect. However, initially, your focus should be on them – how they are doing, how their career is going.

You will not make a very good impression if you call the person out of the blue and ask if they can help you with your job search. You need to show good faith by offering ways to help them as well.

Another way to make connections is through LinkedIn. Look for people who publish frequently on this social media platform. They are likely to be willing to correspond with you, to talk to you about their interests and profession. After all, the reason they are writing is to increase their visibility and reputation.

You can find these people by simply doing a Google search for top influencers on LinkedIn. Before you reach out to the person, however, you need to do a little preparation. Read through their past blogs and other writings. Learn about their background and interests. Then follow them. All of this will lay the groundwork for the day when you do contact the person, raising the odds that you will be more successful.

Other people to consider are employees at companies where you would like to work and people who work in the profession or industry where you work or where you plan to work.

Another group of people to correspond with virtually are recruiters. They often know about positions that have not been advertised. They have developed relationships with people in various industries and will be able to give you insight into the jobs in which you’re interested, as well as the work environments at different companies.

If you reach out and don’t receive any response, don’t give up immediately. Try establishing contact two or three times before moving on.

Staying organized.

When networking virtually, it is important to keep good records. Using a spreadsheet can be a big help. On it, you can record all of the people you have contacted, or plan to contact, along with background information on each person. You should also note when you contacted each person and what form of communication was used (email, text, phone, etc.).

Your notes should also include information about what was discussed and any other details you consider relevant.

Whether you’re looking for short-term work or full-time employment, make sure you take a look at Helpmates’ current job and career opportunities. If you find one or more that sing to you, follow directions on the posting or contact the branch nearest you.

Giving Yourself a Recruiting Degree

No college offers a recruiting degree or one in sourcing. Although there are some very good training programs available, most of what recruiters learn, they pick up on the job.

Los Alamitos staffing

One of the most important parts of recruiting is sourcing candidates. Where can they be found? This involves a good bit of detective work. The recruiter needs to do a lot of research. He or she needs to know where to look.

Some of the sources for talent are rather apparent – websites such as LinkedIn and Indeed can yield many of the people the recruiter is looking for. But to get at all of the talent out there, the recruiter needs to look beyond these more easily accessible sources, and to do this he needs to collect information. Here are some good strategies recruiters can use to gather the information they need to source job candidates.

  • Information on competitors

Recruiters need to keep data in their files on the competition to know what they are up against and what kind of talent competitors are getting. The recruiter needs to know the strengths and weaknesses of companies in their market. Recruiters need to collect salary and benefit data on the companies, as well as employee reviews.

  • Marketing

This is now an important element of a recruiter’s portfolio. Recruiters need to know where which hashtags are the most useful, how to create or post the most interesting content, as well as how to manage a social media calendar. To attract and locate the best candidates, recruiters need to be proficient in the use of social media, which has become one the most important aspects of the job.

To do recruitment marketing well, recruiters again need access to information on marketing and how to do it effectively. The recruiter needs to gather the information, organize it and have it on file for when it is needed.

  • Web browser extensions

Some recruiters recommend web browser extensions as an efficient way to store contact information, as well as tracking and mining data and staying organized.

  • CRM

Experienced recruiters also recommend a CRM database to store information about job candidates. These could be people who have applied for jobs in the past but were not hired, people who were referred by current employees, or internal job candidates. This will help a recruiter develop a pipeline of candidates.

  • Lists

Recruiters also need to put together listings of certain information, such as professional associations, and lists to help with data mining, scraping and extracting.

  • Keeping track of metrics

This will help a recruiter to determine where the best talent is located, and the best way to approach job candidates to increase the chances of success.

For example, it will help sourcing to determine how many times a recruiter needs to contact a candidate before they get a response. Recruiters also should maintain a database of which types of messages are most effective, and keep track of emails to see when they are accessed.

Other important information to maintain:

  • Where the best candidates are coming from.
  • How long it takes to someone to apply for an opening.
  • How long it takes from initial contact with a job candidate until the person is actually hired.
  • Whether candidates who have been sourced by the recruiter move through the hiring process any faster than those who have applied for a job on their own.

Looking for great people for temporary, temp-to-hire and even direct-hire opportunities at your Southern California company? Let us help you! Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more about our recruiting services.

Make Your Resume Stand Out Now and in the Future

Most job seekers are aware that hiring managers spend precious little time looking at individual resumes. So, you need to capture their attention quickly and make them want to read more.

Compton jobs

But, in addition to incorporating information that will pull them in, you also want to avoid other problems that will get your resume tossed quickly in the trash can. Here are a few tips.

  1. Really watch for grammar and spelling errors.

This may seem so obvious that it does not need to be mentioned. But it does because it’s surprising how often errors crop up in resumes. After putting together many resumes for different job opportunities and reading them over, you are more prone to skim the writing and to fill in the gaps mentally. It’s therefore becomes easier to miss errors.

To prevent this, have friends or family members help out by reading the resumes. Each person should focus on one area, such as spelling or grammar and punctuation.

When a hiring manager sees an error, it does not make a good impression at all and can sink your chances of getting an interview.

  1. Tailor your resume to the job.

Each resume you send out needs to be customized for the job you are applying for. You need to take your cue from the job description, taking note of what keywords are used and what kinds of skills are emphasized. Then you need to use the same keywords in your resume and also highlight accomplishments that relate to the sought after skills mentioned in the job description.

  1. Watch your formatting.

The resume needs to be well organized and easy to read. Avoid large blocks of print and long sentences. Make sure you have adequate white space, using headings and short, compelling phrases. Use boldface and italics where appropriate, such as headings and text that you want to stand out.

Some people try to squeeze in more information by using a smaller font and shrinking the margins. But this is not a good idea because it makes the resume harder to read, and a hiring manager is not going to take the time to pick his way through it.

Review and edit your resume several times to make sure you have trimmed all unnecessary information, that your writing is simple, clear and direct, and not wordy.

  1. Focus on accomplishments, not job duties.

You are not going to impress anyone by simply listing job duties and responsibilities. You will make a more compelling case by listing your accomplishments. How did you change or improve things?

Include facts and figures to support your statements. You should not just say you increased sales, but exactly by how much.

You also don’t need to give information about every job you have ever had. If you have had jobs that bear little relevance to the one you are applying for, you can simply give a quick summary.

  1. Use active verbs.

Active verbs have the name because they show movement and action. For example, words such as led, managed, planned, produced and generated are all active verbs. These are the kinds of words you want to use in your resume to show your skills and abilities.

  1. Highlight important skills.

Skills that are essential to the job should be listed at the top of the resume in the professional summary. Don’t wait to list them later in a skills section, for example.

Your summary at the top of the resume is the equivalent of an elevator pitch – a short, powerful statement why the company should hire you.

Many people are looking for work now. If you haven’t lately, take a look at Helpmates’ current job opportunities and, if one or more interest you, follow the listing’s directions and/or contact the branch office nearest you.

Helpmates Wins First-Ever Best of Staffing® Award for Employee Satisfaction

After an extremely tough year for just about everyone, Helpmates Staffing is beyond thrilled to earn the ClearlyRated™ Best of Staffing Award for Employee Satisfaction!

This is in addition to Helpmates once again earning the ClearlyRated™ Best of Staffing® Client and Talent Diamond Awards. (ClearlyRated™ formerly was known as Inavero.)

This is the first year that ClearyRated™ has awarded the Employee Satisfaction and Helpmates is one of just 50 staffing firms across the country to receive this designation. This is all based on our internal employees rating Helpmates. We received an overall Net Promoter Score from our internal team of 74.1 percent (with an 87 percent response rate).

This is the 12th year in a row that we have earned the Client Satisfaction Award and the 10th year we’ve won the Talent Satisfaction Award.

We also earned the Diamond Award in both the Talent and Client categories after winning the Best of Staffing® award in each at least five years in a row. Participating staffing firms are rated by both their clients and their candidates (talent). On average, clients of winning staffing agencies are 3.3 times more likely to be completely satisfied with the agency’s services.

Candidates who have been placed by winning agencies are 1.7 times more likely to be completely satisfied compared to those working with non-winning agencies.

Some Best of Staffing® 2021 statistics of which we are particularly proud include:

  • We received satisfaction scores of 9 or 10 out of a possible 10 from 61.2 percent of our clients, significantly higher than the staffing industry’s average of 38 percent.
  • We received a Net Promoter Score (NPS) of 53.7 percent from our clients, significantly higher than the staffing industry’s average of 28 percent in 2020.
  • We received satisfaction scores of 9 or 10 out of 10 from 86.2 percent of our placed job candidates, significantly higher than the staffing industry’s average of 40 percent.
  • We received an NPS of 81.5 percent from our candidates, more than 60 times the staffing industry’s average of 18 percent in 2020.

Helpmates won in four areas:

  • Client Satisfaction Award (12th year in a row)
  • Talent Satisfaction Award (10th year in a row)
  • The Best of Staffing Client Diamond Award (7th year in a row)
  • The Best of Staffing Talent Diamond Award (5th year in a row)

We’re especially proud of winning Best of Staffing™ because 2020 was so tumultuous for everyone, particularly in regards to the workplace. The above-and-beyond commitment of our internal team members as well as of the terrific individuals who work on assignment at our client’s offices (or remotely from their own homes) is what earned us these awards.

We are tremendously appreciative of our extremely hard working internal and external employees. Thank you for all you do!

Performance Review Strategies for the 2020s

No one enjoys performance reviews – neither managers nor workers. But when done well, they truly can help a supervisor gauge a person’s progress, or lack thereof.

Here are a few strategies to use to make your performance reviews as effective as possible.

Buena Park recruiters

  1. Set an agenda for the meeting.

Begin the meeting by letting the employee know what you will be talking about, so the person knows what is coming. For example, you can tell the employee that you will first talk about how their job has been going, then about areas where he or she can improve or grow, and then things you both can do to make the job more meaningful for the person.

Also during the meeting, you should take notes of everything that was covered. These can be very helpful going forward if there is any question about what was discussed or agreed upon.

  1. Ask for the worker’s opinion.

Before you begin the review, get input from the employee. Find out how they think the job is going. Giving the person the opportunity to express their opinion will help get the meeting off to a good start. It will also help to give you an idea of the employee’s mindset and attitude.

Indeed, the employee may volunteer information about where they can improve and new projects he would like to undertake.

  1. Give positive feedback.

Again, it helps to begin by giving positive feedback to the worker so that they know their work is recognized and valued. Be as specific as possible. For example, if the person has done a good job completing a particular project or handling a tricky negotiation, you should let them know about it.

  1. Talk about ways to grow in the job.

No matter how well someone is doing in a job, there are always areas where they can improve. And you are not doing your job as a supervisor if you are not helping your people grow in their jobs. You have to think about what the person can do to prepare for positions they would like to hold in the future.

What skills does the person need to grow in the job, and what can you do to help the person acquire those skills?

Conversely, if the person is struggling, you would focus on giving them useful feedback. The focus would be on the skills the person should be building in order to improve their performance. You should be able to provide specific examples of how the person can make improvements

  1. Talk about future goals.

You also need to talk about where the person is headed. Are they looking for a promotion? Are you planning on assigning them to a new project? What performance issues need to be addressed if the person is to succeed with the company in the long term?

  1. Ask questions.

Finally, come back around to the employee’s opinions. Go into more detail about the opinions they expressed earlier in the review. Probe a little more deeply. Ask how they feel about the job, what is going well and what isn’t. Find out what kinds of goals they have.

The employee may have touched on these issues earlier, but it is always good idea to delve a little more deeply. Allowing the worker to express their feelings will help with engagement and productivity.

Traditionally, employee performance reviews have been held once a year. But many companies now realize that such meetings need to be held more often, at least several times during the year, if they are to be of real use to everyone involved. Ideally, managerial feedback should be an ongoing process.

If your company needs to replace an employee due to performance issues, contact the the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more about our recruiting and placement services.

Interviewing for a Remote Job? Ask These Questions

If you are interviewing for a remote job, the company’s culture becomes even more important. Why? The culture at the company will play a big role in how successful a person will be in such a job because collaboration, communication and teamwork become that much more important when everyone works remotely.

Santa Ana jobs

Here are some important questions to ask about the job to make sure the company is providing the support you need to be successful.

  1. What kind of hours will you be working?

Most people assume if they are working remotely that they would have greater flexibility with their hours, being able to decide when they work. But the opposite tends to be the case. You will need to establish a regular schedule, one that coincides with the rest of your team.

Another thing you need to take into account if everyone on your team is working remotely across different time zones is the communication set up among everyone. If the time zones are different, it may require you to work at times outside of traditional work hours.

  1. How many people are working remotely?

You need to determine how common remote work is within the company. Is everyone working remotely, or will you be one of just a few people who are working from home? If everyone is working remotely, you will be working under the same conditions as everyone else, with the same opportunities as everyone else.

If, however, you will be just one of a few who are working remotely, it is more likely that you will have to make the effort to ensure you remain connected and are not missing out on any opportunities.

  1. How do people communicate?

It is important to ask about your supervisor’s management style because this acquires even greater importance for remote workers. Your supervisor cannot just drop by your desk to fill you in on something or give you an update. So, how they plan to keep everyone working together and informed is of primary importance.

You also need to find out what kind of access you will have to your manager. Ideally, you want to have the same kind of access that you would if you were working in an office. How often does he or she have meetings, and what kind of network platform does the company use? Do managers communicate often individually with the people on their team? How often do team members communicate with each other

If you ask how the supervisor plans to keep you connected and informed while working remotely, and he doesn’t have a good answer, that should raise a red flag. This is exactly the kind of thing that should have been worked out. If it isn’t, it shows the company doesn’t value their remote workers as much.

  1. How would you get feedback?

Ask them how they plan to give feedback to remote workers. If they have no procedure worked out, you can suggest one to them, such as getting together every few weeks to talk about goals and performance. If they balk at this idea, this is another red flag that they are not ready to invest in the growth of their remote workers.

  1. How is the company improving the remote work environment?

Working remotely presents its own unique kinds of challenges and obstacles. The hiring manager should be able to describe how the company is responding to those problems and what they are doing to enhance the remote work environment.

If you’re looking for work – whether it’s a remote job or not – make sure to check out Helpmates’ latest job opportunities. If one or more appeal to you, apply online or contact the Helpmates branch nearest you.

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