When it’s Time to Start Your “Plan B” Job Search

When the pandemic hit, and lockdowns proliferated, companies began furloughs and layoffs. You lost your job. Since then you have been operating in job search mode, trying to find a position that will move you along in your career, work that fits the skills and talents you have acquired in your profession and that you find interesting and challenging.

Compton jobs

But it’s been several months with only a few nibbles. Will the situation improve? Who can say? As of early August there were more than 31 million people without a job. The future remains uncertain. It may be time to move from Plan A to Plan B in your job search.

Plan B is expanding the job search beyond those jobs and companies that you really want to a different type of position or even industry to give yourself more opportunity. Here is how to develop your Plan B.

  1. Define your optimal job

Your first task is to make a list of the characteristics that define your dream job. This will help to guide you as you expand your search.

Think about what the perfect job would be like for you – what would it pay, what kind of work-life balance would it offer, how stressful would it be, what would the company culture be like, what kind of flexibility would it offer?

Then think about your skills. List what hard skills you have, the kinds of abilities that are measurable, as well as the soft skills, things like communication skills, empathy, ability to work with others, problem solving.

Look at Plan B jobs with an eye for how they can help you eventually land a job that you really want. Look for connections between the two in terms of the types of skills they use. For example, if your ideal job is in advertising, you could also look for positions in related fields such as public relations or marketing, jobs that will enable you to gain skills that will help you to land a job in advertising.

You also should keep going after the Plan A jobs. Look at the job descriptions for different types of Plan A jobs to learn the kinds of skills these jobs require, so you can pick up these skills with Plan B jobs.

Also, see what type of training you can undergo to help gain the skills you need.

  1. Network

The importance of networking is common knowledge. It should be an integral part of your job search. Try to expand your network of contacts during your job search. The new people you reach out to may be able to give you insights into different industries, jobs you had not considered before, or companies you did not know about.

Talk to them about both your Plan A and Plan B goals. Ask for recommendations and advice or possible contacts at companies. Then work to expand your network by reaching out to these people online. When you talk to someone, always ask the person if there is anyone else you can talk to for information.

  1. Informational interviews

Informational interviews, as the name implies, are just for the purpose of gathering information. They are not job interviews. When you reach out to new contacts, ask them if they have a little time for an informational interview call or video talk. They may be able to give you worthwhile knowledge about companies and jobs.

Before you talk to a person, however, you should do some preparation. Learn as much as you can in advance about the person and their company, so you can ask intelligent questions. Draw up a list of questions beforehand as well to ensure you cover the topics you want.

  1. Consider temporary assignments

If you’ve yet to receive a job offer for the type of position you want in the industry you want and you’re getting worried about finances, consider working with a temporary staffing company such as Helpmates. Temporary work can help you keep some income coming in while you continue hustling for your Plan A position.

In fact, you may find that a temporary position with us becomes your Plan B: many temporary positions often do become regular, full-time opportunities.

Take a look at our current openings and application instructions. You also can register with the branch office nearest you.

 

The Bottom-Line Benefits of Becoming a Fully Remote Company

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, many people began working remotely to avoid becoming infected with the virus. They did it out of necessity. But companies and workers are seeing that working remotely has a number of advantages in addition to keeping healthy – benefits that can help to boost the bottom line.

La Mirada staffing

One study found that companies can save as much as $11,000 a year per employee by allowing them to work from home half of the time. Here are a few more advantages for businesses from transitioning to a remote workforce.

  1. Saving on overhead

If you have a workforce that is fully remote, there is no need for a brick-and-mortar building. That is a huge savings in itself. You also save on all of the associated costs of having a building – utilities, rent, maintenance, and parking, to name a few.

You also don’t have to worry about furniture, desks, and computers.

  1. Fewer absences

Working at home offers employees greater flexibility to take care of personal matters without having to take off from work. If a worker needs to attend an event at his or her child’s school, for example, he or she can go to the event, return home – and possibly work beyond “normal” work hours – without having to ask for a half-day off from work.

If a worker has a mild illness, a cold for example, they are more likely to get work done at home, rather than taking time off from work out of fear of spreading the illness to coworkers.

  1. Greater productivity

Research has shown that employees who work remotely are more productive than those who work at the office. They don’t have to take the time for a morning and evening commute. They don’t have to deal with the interruptions that are common to office workplaces.

People working remotely usually work longer hours than those who work in an office, and they enjoy the work more. Because they have greater flexibility and freedom, they are happier in their work, and this positive outlook increases productivity. One study has found that happy workers are 13 percent more productive than those who are not.

  1. Less turnover

Lower employee turnover is another fringe benefit of having a more satisfied workforce. Because those who work remotely are happier in their jobs, they tend to stay in them longer.

This can save a company a lot of money. Hiring new people is expensive, as much as $4,000 per person. Plus, there is the time involved. You need to advertise jobs, review applications, schedule interviews, and onboard the new people, along with any other training that is needed.

Moreover, higher turnover can have a big impact on productivity. When people leave, projects are interrupted. New people need to brought up to speed on what is being done.

Managers also like remote workers: 79 percent of them in a 2019 survey said that remote it’s a great “non-monetary” way to retain employees. Moreover, remote workers say they are more likely to stay with their current companies than people who do not work remotely.

Humans are social creatures and about six months into a lot of remote working,  some employees are saying they look forward to returning to the office,  at least part-time. But most are saying they don’t want to return full time.

The next few months will really show how  much your workers do – or don’t – want to work from home but if you’re wondering if a fully remote workforce is the right move for you, there definitely some financial benefits to it.

Whether you decide to keep everyone working remotely or you want them to return to the office full time, the recruiters at Helpmates can help you source, vet and place terrific workers. Contact the Helpmates branch office nearest you for more information.

Overcoming the Overwhelm When Working at Home

The pandemic has caused a lot of upheaval in people’s lives. Many of us now work remotely, all the while trying to take precautions against the virus. We battle with a lot of anxiety and stress and even some disorientation. It’s a lot to get used to.

Whittier careers

Working from home also presents unique challenges. We need to overcome distractions from family and friends. Work time tends to bleed into personal and family time until it often feels like there is no boundary between the two. It is easy to feel that we’ve lost control.

If you are feeling overwhelmed, you need to examine the sources of stress in your life. Here are a few things you can do to cope, and here are even more tips.

  • Take breaks

When working, it is best to take a short break about once each hour. That is about the limit of time that our minds can focus intensely. If that doesn’t suit your routine, you should definitely take a break when you are feeling stressed or fatigued.

Do something physical during your break, such as taking a short walk, doing some quick callisthenic-type exercises, throwing some dirty laundry in the washer, or cutting up some vegetables for supper. This helps to get the blood flowing, delivering more oxygen to the brain, improving your mood and reducing stress.

  • Set benchmarks

Most of us procrastinate, at least some of the time. If a big project is due in two weeks, we wait until a week or so has gone by before starting to work on it. To eliminate this problem, try setting benchmark goals. Break down the project into smaller tasks and set deadlines for each of  them on the way to your final goal.

  • Don’t be too hard on yourself

We all make mistakes. When we do, often there is a feeling of embarrassment and inadequacy, especially among perfectionists. We scold ourselves for our poor performance and become angry and depressed. If you screw up, forgive yourself. Don’t take it too hard. Realize that everyone makes mistakes and experiences failure. Treat it as a learning experience and move on.

  • Make time for you

No matter how busy you are or what you have on your plate, you need to take care of yourself. If you don’t, your performance and productivity will suffer in the long run. Take time to exercise every day. Eat a healthy diet. Get seven to eight hours of sleep. Take time to interact with family and friends. You’ll feel better, have more energy and get more done. You may even want to try meditation. Research has shown that it can help you focus and lessen stress.

  • Reduce the “modern” type of “clutter”

If you stop and take the time to notice, you will be surprised at the amount of time wasted each day on frivolous activities. For example, how often do you check your email, Facebook, texts and Instagram? How much time do you spend reading blogs or diddling around YouTube?

These are time sinks. If you want to get more control of your life, cut back on the amount of time you waste on these activities.

  • Remember your purpose.

When things get chaotic and stressful, it’s easy to lose sight of the forest for the trees. Remember why you chose this profession and this job in the first place and the things you want to accomplish in your career. Look at your current situation as a step along the way.

  • Get organized

Believe it or not, just looking at a cluttered desk can increase your stress level. Studies have shown that people who are better organized are more productive and not as stressed out.

Is your current employer asking you to work from home 24/7? Sensing that your boss truly is asking too much and it’s time to find another position? Check out our current job opportunities and, if you find one or more of interest, follow application instructions.

E-mailing Passive Candidates in the Age of AI

If you’re a recruiter trying to catch the attention of a passive job candidate, you may feel like Sisyphus of ancient Greek mythology – the man who was doomed to forever push a large rock up a hill, only to have it roll back down again.

Buena Park staffing

In other words, you may feel that it’s an exercise in futility. And – no doubt about it – catching the eye of passive job candidates is tough: they are inundated with emails of all types. Yours is simply one more that clutters up their inbox, especially if they don’t have any interest in leaving their current place of employment.

But don’t give up hope. All is not lost. You can get their attention. It’s all in the approach.

  • Out with the old, in with the new

If you have email templates that you have been using for years, now is the time to get rid of them. They are most likely outdated and do not address the concerns and attitudes that passive candidates have today.

  • Be honest and sincere

Try to put yourself in the place of the candidate. What kind of approach would you appreciate the most? It probably is one that is simple, clear, and direct.

You want the email to be professional, but not too stiff or formal. Nor do you want to be overly familiar, avoiding a back-slapping kind of approach. A straightforward, authentic approach works best. You don’t want to use any gimmicks or any kind of sales pitch. Avoid redundancy or filler. Each line should carry its weight in getting the message across.

Read the email aloud. This really helps you to get an idea of how it sounds and the impression it makes.

  • Double check for errors

The email needs to show professionalism. Check for any spelling or grammatical mistakes. Don’t use abbreviations. Check to make sure you have spelled the candidate’s name correctly.

  • Be specific

Let the person know what they have to gain from reading the email. Avoid any vague language or descriptions. Writing something like “this is a great opportunity” really doesn’t tell the person about the job. It is better to explain what makes the job worth their interest and what it has to offer, such as salary and benefits.

While you do want to put some details in the email, you also need to be careful that you don’t make it too long. It should be short and to the point, with only the most relevant information – who you are, what the job is, and why you are contacting the person. Include the title of the job and the next step for the person to take if they’re interested.

  • Do your research

You are much more likely to get a response if you contact a person about a job that fits their particular skills and experience. To ensure a job is applicable, however, you need to do some research on their background first on social media sites or professional networks.

  • Write and rewrite

Writing well takes work and time. To make your email compelling, you should first write a rough draft and then rewrite it a few times to get it just right. Quality is more important than quantity.

  • Make sure they know you’re human

We have to admit, we found this great tip in an article we read recently and unfortunately we can’t find it now. The recruiter/author said she had great success with her emails to passive candidates when she wrote in the subject line: I am a person, not a bot and I have a career opportunity that might suit you.

This approach worked for her, she said, because too many people receive to many AI-generated emails and automatically delete them. Beat the bots at their own game and declare your humanity!

We know where the good candidates hang out! Reach out to the recruiters at the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more about our staffing services.

Over 65 and Wondering if THIS is the Time to Retire? You’re Not Alone.

If you’re nearing retirement age, you’ve probably wondered: “Is THIS the time to cut the employment cord and retire?”

If so, you’re definitely not alone: even people who haven’t yet reached “full retirement age” (which is about age 66 now, depending on your year of birth) have been thinking of taking early retirement (if they’re at least age 62) or simply calling it quits if they can rely on a younger spouse’s income (or if they feel they’ve enough money saved).

Irvine jobs

The main reasons why your age cohort members are thinking this are two:

  • They’ve either been laid off and can’t find work and/or,
  • They’re worried about getting infected by the novel coronavirus and becoming severely ill with COVID-19 if they return to/continue working outside the home.

If you’re thinking of retiring now, some facts:

Additional news you really do need to know…

Let’s say you’re worried about catching the virus because people older than age 65 do tend to be at greater risk for a more pronounced COVID-19 illness. Let’s also say your employer closed its physical location(s) and you’ve been working at home for the last few months, or you’ve been furloughed and haven’t been working at all. But now your employer says its reopening and calls you back on-site. You decide to ask if you can stay at home due to the risk factor.

Unfortunately, your employer is under no obligation to accommodate you under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. (It does have a duty to accommodate you if you’re already covered under the ADA, however.) If you refuse to come in, your employer could let you go and because you “quit voluntarily” you’re probably not eligible for unemployment benefits. (There might be exceptions if your job site “is truly unsafe,” according to the link just provided.)

Of course, if you’ve already been working at home, you always can ask your employer if you can continue to do so.

Not an easy decision (and there’s an understatement)

Unfortunately, for many older workers the pandemic has changed their planned for (hoped for?) retirement schedule. Choosing to retire is not a decision to make quickly; it’s best to sit down (with your partner, if applicable) and crunch some numbers.

If you are an older worker and are looking for work, take a look at our temporary, contract-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities. If one or more appeal to you, either contact the Helpmates’ branch office nearest you or follow the listing’s application instructions.

Looking into Our Crystal Ball: Predicting the Future of Remote Work Post-Pandemic

Waaay back (in late 2019), about 7 million of us worked remotely full-time, which was about 3.2 percent of the entire workforce. In addition, about 43 percent of us worked at home at least part time.

Gardena staffing

Now, during the pandemic? Gallup in mid-March began polling people regarding working from home and reported that 39 percent of those polled said their employer offered “flex time or remote work options.” That number increased to 57 percent in polling conducted between March 30 and April 2. We wouldn’t be surprised if it’s more, now (late July, when we wrote this post).

What does the future hold? Our guess is that remote work is here to stay!

Not everyone can work from home, of course, but for those who can, it’s looking more and more as if they will want to continue doing so, at least one or two days a week. This particularly could be the case if the COVID-19 crisis remains with us for the remainder of the year and into early next. That is, the longer people get to work remotely, the more they’ll want to.

Most remote workers LOVE to work at home!

The Gallup research article linked to above mentioned that 59 percent of people polled who are working from home because of the pandemic said they’d prefer to do so as often as possible once health restrictions are lifted.

In fact, folks working from home like it so much that they told pollsters that they’d be willing to quit their current employer to find another remote position if their current company did away with remote work.

Remote workers ARE more productive

A recent survey conducted by CoSo Cloud found that 77 percent of remote workers said their productivity grew when they started working from home. (Fifty-two percent also said they were less likely to take time off.)

Some might be thinking: “Well, of course the employees will say they’re more productive! But are they really!?” Yes they are. Data are showing a 47 percent increase in employee productivity this year.

The future isn’t here yet and therefore nothing is absolutely certain…

…but it appears as if more of those employees who can work from home, will.

Gartner, for example, believes that about 48 percent of employees are “likely” to work remotely at least part-time post-pandemic, up from 30 percent before COVID-19 turned the world upside down and shook it vigorously.

Not everyone agrees, of course: other experts believe workers will return to the office. Working from home can be very lonely; therefore, according to the research firm Gensler, “only 12 percent of people want to continue to work from home full-time after the pandemic  subsides.” In addition, Gensler reports that of those who would like to work from home at least some of the time, that some of the time amounts to no more than two or three days per week. Possibly less.

Our prediction?

We believe a good number of people will continue to want to work from home full time. Whether this number is more than those who prefer to work in an office full-time will depend on how well the physical office meets their needs as well as their child care requirements and arrangements.

Still, we believe a lot more workers than before the pandemic will want at least the option to work remotely full- or part time. Savvy employers will understand that this option could well become a required employee benefit if they want to attract top talent – and what employer doesn’t want to do so?

If you’d like to offer remote work to potential employees who normally didn’t work remotely before the COVID-19 crisis (call center workers or customer service representatives, for example), contact Helpmates. We recently helped two of our call center clients move our specialists to full remote work, and we can do the same for you.

Staying Motivated During Your Job Search While in a – Hello! – Freaking Pandemic!

We don’t have to tell you that it’s rough out there: about 31.8 million plus folks are out of work nationwide (as of early July).  In fact, Los Angeles County itself had an unemployment rate of 19.4 percent in June.

So it’s understandable that, if you’ve been looking for work for two or three months, that your job search motivation might be, shall we say, “lagging” a bit.

Yes, it’s rough, but if there’s one thing to focus on, it’s this:

Anaheim recruiters

You are a job seeker of one. There’s one of you; you need just one job. Don’t worry about ALL the other people applying to the jobs available. Instead, focus just on getting the job you need.

That said, even if you’ve been looking for work for weeks with no luck, even if you feel beaten down and just can’t bear to look at a job board ever again, let alone send in an application, you definitely can get your motivation back. Here’s how.

Set short-term goals

You’ve done tough things in your past. Perhaps you’ve:

  • Given birth/gone through labor
  • Run a marathon
  • Lost 50 pounds
  • Saved up money for a new laptop (rather than put it on a credit card)

What do those things have in common? They were relatively short-lived and you looked forward to a specific outcome when you finished them. You knew “the end” was coming.

Looking for work, on the other hand, has no set timeline. You don’t know when “the end” will come. You have a goal – get a new job – but it has no set endpoint that you can control.

So set short-term goals. Goals such as:

  • You will reach out to 15 people by Friday.
  • You will apply to 15 jobs by Friday. (This is a different goal than the one above because reaching out to people is different than applying for jobs. In addition, you will tweak your resume/cover letter to be specific to each position to which you’re applying.)
  • You will post at least one comment on the LinkedIn groups to which you belong by Friday.
  • And so on.

Give yourself rewards for meeting each goal.

And we do mean EACH goal! Looking for work is hard (as you well know). It’s definitely “not fun” (putting it lightly). You definitely should celebrate when you reach a goal. You truly deserve it!

Focus on processes, not results

Your goals shouldn’t be, “I’ll get a job by the end of September.” “I’ll get 2 interviews a week in August.” Why shouldn’t you make these types of goals? Because you have no control over whether the goal will “be met.” (For example, you have no control on whether a hiring manager will call you in for an interview.) Instead, focus on what you can control: the process. Send out X resumes a week. Reach out to X people per week. And so on. Work the process and the process will work for you.

Keep looking and you WILL land a job!

It’s amazing what consistently “working the process” does when it comes to just about anything (weight loss, exercise, learning a new skill, etc.). It’s the same with the job search, no matter what the “conditions” are surrounding your efforts, setting small, process-focused goals – and meeting them – will help you get your job-search mojo back and land you a job sooner than you may think.

Helpmates has several job opportunities available right now and many of them need people to start working immediately. Take a look at our current openings and follow the instructions for applying to the ones that interest you.

Prepare Today for the Post-COVID Hiring World

Getting to a post-COVID19 world is going to take some time. Even as we gingerly make our way to reopening our economy, California has been hit with a big increase in infections and some business restrictions have been reinstated.

But whether it takes months or a year or more, the hiring scene will return to some resemblance of how it was before the pandemic.

Santa Fe Springs recruiters

Rather than wait months to prepare for that time, it’s wise for employers to start getting ready now.

Whether you’ve put hiring on hold, are hiring more than you did before March, whether you’re planning another reduction in force, or even if you’re worried that another complete shutdown is in the offing, here are some tips to help you prepare for the days when hiring returns to some semblance of normalcy.

First, some questions to ask:

  • How has the pandemic and the shutdown changed your particular hiring process? Many people have gone to a virtual interview process, but some have not. What do you see keeping and what will you change when the pandemic is behind us?
  • You undoubtedly are reading many articles such as this one that discuss what recruiting and hiring will look like post-pandemic. From your reading and discussions with others, how do you think your talent acquisition process – your sourcing, your talent pipeline management, your onboarding steps, etc. – will need to change?

Digging deeper:

  • Look at your recruitment strategies now. If you’re currently hiring, are you attracting the right candidates now? If you’re not hiring, were you attracting the right type of person before the pandemic started? Where were the roadblocks and/or weaknesses in sourcing, interviewing and onboarding and how can you fix them?
  • Technology can certainly help you now and in the future. Do you need to upgrade your video interviewing capabilities? Should you invest in some chatbot capabilities so that you can automate answers to candidates’ typical answers, thus freeing up your recruiters’ time for more important tasks? Time to purchase some resume screening software?
  • Could your recruiters themselves use some additional training or certifications so that they’re fully acclimated to recruiting/HR technology and laws?
  • What about your recruiting policies? Have you looked at them lately? Do they need updating to reflect the changes you’ve already made – and will make?
  • Are you reaching out to passive candidates? Yes, you’re probably able to choose among the best-of-the-best unemployed candidates now. But this employer’s hiring market will Connecting with – even hiring – passive candidates now so that they’ll return your emails later is a wise move.
  • Even if you’re not hiring now, keep in touch with the unemployed professionals reaching out to you now. After all, someone who contacts you even though there’s no current job opening is someone who is assertive, a hustler. Probably someone you might want on your team someday!
  • If you’re not already staying in touch with former candidates and passive candidates, invest in some regular email outreach (newsletters). If you’ve texted in the past, keep texting now. Regular communication now – even though you may not be recruiting – will pay dividends when you are.

Good candidates will become “hard to find” again

By taking the time now to look at what is and isn’t working in your current recruiting process, changing it as needed, and continuing to communicate with candidates past, present and possibly future, your company can create a great sourcing, recruiting, onboarding, and communication process now, ensuring that you’re ready for the future.

Are you getting ready for a big hiring push in the near – or far – future? Partnering with a recruiting firm now can help make that process run smoothly and effectively when you need it.

Contact Helpmates to learn how we can help with your recruiting needs now and post-COVID19.

The Skills in Demand in a Post-COVID World

The Skills in Demand in a Post-COVID World

While the COVID-19 pandemic has changed pretty much everything in our world in these past three or four months, one thing that remains the same – in many ways – are the skills employers will be looking for now and for the foreseeable future.

One would think that since so much has changed, so would desired job skills. But that’s not really the case.  What’s more, most don’t even require learning new skills; you probably already possess one or more them. (And what a relief that is!)

A few in-demand skills include:

  • Creativity, out-of-the-box thinking, an innovative mind-set.

Fullerton jobs

No schooling needed for this in-demand skill! Companies that were able to adapt to the new business reality have survived with relative ease compared to their competitors.

For example, restaurants that saw the opportunity in take-out/delivery services now certainly have a leg up as the economy reopens than do their competitors who completely shuttered.

An even better example? Mercedes-AMG-HPP moved quickly from making automobiles to making ventilators.

If you’re the type of person who sees opportunity in a challenge, who likes solving problems in new ways, and if you can show this trait to employers, you’ll be a stand-out compared to other candidates.

  • Emotional intelligence.

Most of us are, well, not ourselves right now.  Anxiety. Worry about our own and loved ones’ health. Fear about finding a good job. SO MUCH STRESS!

Candidates who have the ability to “read” others’ emotions and deal with them in caring ways are always in demand, yet especially so now.

  • Leadership.

This actually is related to emotional intelligence in that the best leaders usually possess it in spades. And if ever employers needed workers with leadership mindsets, it’s now. And you don’t have to be in management to let your leadership skills shine. Instead, anyone who can inspire co-workers, lead teammates in a collaboration project, etc. is going to be highly desirable to employers.

  • Digital skills, including coding.

Digital skills have become even more critical during the pandemic as many people have started working remotely, on computers.

Coding, in fact, is a highly desirable skill set, one that pays very well (high five figures is common).

If you don’t yet have digital skills, you can get them via credentialing online certification programs, many of which are offered by California colleges and universities. UC Berkeley has an online extension program in coding, for example, open to anyone anywhere in the world. Some coding experience is helpful but not necessary.

Put your current leadership, emotional intelligence and creative thinking skills to work now by taking a look at Helpmates’ current job opportunities. If one or more of them look interesting to you, follow the posting’s application instructions or contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Moving Beyond the “Hive Mind” When Recruiting

Bees. The golden with black stripes heroes of pollination. You no doubt have heard of their “hive mind”: the coordinated behavior they appear to exhibit, all in the benefit of the hive. It’s as if the there’s a single mind controlling each bee’s behavior. This is the “hive mind.”

Santa Ana staffing company

In recruiting, a “hive mind” is one in which recruiters and hiring managers always look for people who fill a certain mold, who have certain characteristics, have the same background, see the world in the same way.

Instead, to truly compete in 2020 and beyond, we believe your organization should search for candidates who have a mind of their own, who don’t think the same way you do, who are different.

Right now is the perfect time to expand your “perfect hire” beliefs

Many – far too many – great people are now out of work and hot in their hunts for new employment, making it easy to find people who aren’t your “typical” type of candidates who nevertheless would make terrific employees. 

Beginning the reframe

Take a look at the characteristics, backgrounds and skills of current employees you believe have the best qualifications for their positions. Remember that except for specific training for technical opportunities, job requirements most often are malleable.

As you look at your best employees, don’t worry so much about specific past jobs or past education – particularly schools attended – but more about their accomplishments. Also, look at their key characteristics: are they go-getters or are they a bit reticent? Do they work best alone or in teams? Remember, you’re not looking for specific experiences but their accomplishments and the characteristics that helped them make those accomplishments.

Ascertaining what it takes to actually succeed in a role and then looking for the particular characteristics of those successful workers, helps you change your thinking as to “what kind” of candidate will succeed.

Look for candidates who overcome obstacles and talk to them about how they thought about the challenges and what they did to overcome them.

Such people tend to those have the natural ability to roll with the punches, figure out how to overcome roadblocks and apply their past experiences to figuring out how to succeed in new situations.

Focus on transferable skills and behaviors rather than specific industry experience

For example, if an administrative assistant with considerable payroll experience was able to upgrade her previous employer’s (a regional insurance company) payroll system, surely she can manage the payroll for your furniture manufacturing enterprise?

Remember: if you’re leery of such an individual’s ability to transfer from one industry to another, robust behavioral interviews that focus on the tasks pertinent to the job can help you ascertain if they’d be a good fit. After all, past behavior almost always is an accurate predictor of future behavior.

Hiring from “outside the hive” can bring your company a competitive advantage

Diverse teams of people with different backgrounds, education, skills, and work history create diverse teams, helping employees move away from “groupthink,” encouraging your business to change outdated views that no longer serve your company and move easily into the many changes that this second decade of the second millennium no doubt will bring.

What’s more, in these weeks of massive unemployment, your company would be helping someone who’s “not perfect” in the sense of specific background or industry experience find work.

Looking for great people for your Southern California company? Helpmates has terrific specialists thoroughly vetted and well-oriented in best Covid-19 workplace practices to work on assignment for you either on-site or remotely. Contact the branch location nearest you to learn more.

 

© Year Helpmates Staffing Services. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Statement | Site Map | Site Credits.