Managing the Unseen Worker

More employees are working remotely than ever before. Some estimates claim as many as 70 percent of all workers around the world work remotely at least once a week.

This has become a trend in large part because of advances in technology, making it easier to communicate and share information.

Fullerton Staffing

There are several advantages to having employees work remotely. One is that it helps companies recruit the best talent, no matter where they are located. Studies have also shown that people who work remotely are more productive than those who do not.

But managing remote teams presents unique challenges as well as opportunities. Here are a few tips on how to handle the challenges.

  1. Be clear about what is expected.

Managers need to set clear guidelines for remote workers. This should cover areas such as when the person should be accessible, working hours, when the employee needs to check in and in what type of communication.

Performance expectations should be set, as well as productivity goals and deadlines. The focus should be on the goals.

Remote workers also need to participate in the same meetings as other workers. For example, if a department has a daily planning session, remote workers should be expected to participate.

Having remote workers participate in the same routines as those who work in the office ensures that everyone is working together. It also helps create stronger bonds between the remote workers and their managers.

  1. Communicate frequently.

Managers should make it a point to have regular conversations with their remote workers individually. Communication with remote employees is especially important, whether it be casual conversation or planned meetings for feedback.

Contacting remote workers informally every day, in addition to scheduled meetings, also is wise. Some companies use video technology to stay in touch.

  1. Use the right technology.

You need to provide your telecommuters with the technology capable of allowing them to work together, to communicate easily and share information among all team members. There are many different software platforms available for this kind of service, ones that offer frameworks for team collaboration and the resources to solve complex problems.

The software should let teams organize their work and synchronize their goals. The tech tools used should be able to show clearly what individual responsibilities are and help managers see what each person is working on. The technology should also help employees to see how their work fits into the overall project and allow the team to respond nimbly to internal and external changes.

  1. Provide professional development opportunities.

Telecommuters should have the chance to train for new skills and grow in their careers, both in structured environments as well as informal settings. Managers should work with remote workers to set individual professional development goals.

  1. Resist micromanaging.

Bringing many different teams together in various locations demands a high degree of organization and coordination. But managers should resist the temptation to orchestrate this collaboration from above, but rather allow teams to work out processes and procedures on their own and to take responsibility for their work.

Give team members the autonomy to exercise their professional judgment and decision making, but hold them accountable. Allowing them to put together their own organizational frameworks also increases employee engagement.

Looking for remote workers for your Southern California company? Contact Helpmates. We can source, vet and even provide preliminary interviews for skilled and talented candidates. Call the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Employee Retention Strategies that Work During Boom or Bust

You know that employee retention in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas is a major issue today because you no doubt are struggling with this at your own company. You also understand that most employees leave because they are unhappy in some way (and it often is because you disappointed them in some way of something you haven’t done for them).

Finally, you realize that your – perhaps – previous notion that a possible looming recession doesn’t mean your retention woes will abate.

Torrance staffing

We aren’t telling you anything you don’t already know: retention is a problem. A big one. To help, we’ve put together a short list of retention strategies that work whether it’s a candidate’s market like it is now….or not.

Take a look below.

  • Begin with the end in mind.

That is, hire only the best and aim with laser focus on job candidates’ character.

Yes, this won’t help you now if you’re already experienced a good deal of employee churn. But with every employee who leaves, work to hire only the best of the best from there on out.

Because top workers love to work with other top workers, the idea is to build an employee roster of the best-of-the-best. Which results in everyone being more motivated, productive and loyal because your company’s culture is one that provides the best and most engaging place to work…for everyone.

This tactic worked for Netflix, as it now enjoys an above-average employee retention rate.

  • Focus on developing great managers.

Ensuring that your managers are terrific makes great sense. They are, after all, the direct link between your executive suite and everyone else. Great managers help members of their team execute your company’s goals and vision; poor managers can allow everyone to become mired in personality conflicts and minutiae. Focus is lost.  Sturm und drang builds. Goals are unmet.

But if you tell your managers that their main job is to build great teams while providing them the leadership training and tools to do so, you’ll find that they – and the members of their team – stick around.

After all, they will have become a “great boss,” and people love to work for great people. As for “bad bosses”? Employees leave.

  • Empower employees in the decision-making process and create a culture of ownership

If you have an angry customer in front of you or on the phone and you decide then and there what you’ll do about it without asking your boss first, how do you think you’ll feel? Empowered? You bet! But don’t you also have a feeling of ownership: this is your job, your decision and your positive outcome? Going to feel pretty darn good about working for your employer? Yes, indeed! Plan to leave anytime soon? Probably not.

  • Build a values-driven culture/company.

What does your company believe in, stand for? What is its purpose? These concepts may appear woo-woo, but think about it: having a purpose (raising a family well, being of service to others, becoming wealthy so that you can give a considerable amount of money to a favorite cause) helps get you up in the morning.

Establishing some core values at your company around behind which your employees can rally can transform your business and fire up employees.

Examples of core values:

  • “We Support Employees’ Growth”
  • “We Work to Provide the Best Service to all Our Customers”
  • “We Aim to Delight Our Customers”

 

  • Commit to investing in employees’ personal development.

This includes not only professional development but also personal growth. That is, provide employee growth opportunities that help not only the company but also employees’ individual goals.

  • As much as possible, encourage autonomy.

Not every position at a company can be unsupervised, of course, but most can. Giving workers autonomy means they’ll have to take on more responsibility, allowing them to push themselves to “figure it out.” Most will blossom under such a scenario. Another benefit? Don’t be surprised if your workers become more engaged and passionate about their work. And who wants to leave a job about which they feel passionate?

  • Just because it’s work doesn’t meant it can’t be fun.

Encourage your workers to actually see and interact with each other. In person. (We know; what a concept.) Encourage employees to move away from phone and text conversations to face-to-face meetings. What kind of team rituals could you create that encourage people to get together regularly: monthly lunch potlucks, bowling nights, birthday parties, lunch and learn meetings, yoga class after work?

And let’s not forget employee rewards/perks, which can be both exciting and easy to think of in Southern California. For example, let employees know that after one year of employment, their name will be placed in a raffle for tickets to ComicCon (or Disney’s D23 convention for those so minded). Depending on how robust your turnover is, sweeten the pot and provide a large-ish gift for those who stay with you five years: guaranteed tix to ComicCon/D23, etc.

Housing is beyond expensive in Southern California. Could you provide low-interest loans or help with a down payment on a home for employees who stay at least 5 years? Or tuition help for employees and/or their children? Get creative. Ask employees what they would appreciate. Celebrate the awards when given. Let a four-year employee know that they have just one more year to go before they’re eligible for the benefits you’ve set aside. Anticipation in in this case can work wonders.

If an employee suddenly quits and you need a replacement quickly, contact the Helpmates branch nearest you. We can get someone in to replace the departing worker for a day, a week …or even “forever” (we can source, recruit and perform preliminary screening and interviewing for you). We look forward to hearing from you.

Got Ghosts? Here’s How to Bust Them

A turbocharged economy has drastically reduced unemployment and created a buyer’s market for jobs. This state of affairs has given rise to a new phenomenon in recruiting, and a new word has entered the recruiting lexicon to describe it: ghosting.

It happens when a job candidate – or even someone who’s accepted your job offer – simply drops from sight. They’ve become a ghost.

Cypress Staffing

It can happen at any stage of the recruiting process.

  • The recruiter may try to get in touch with the person without any response. No return call. Nothing.
  • Or the person may be scheduled for a job interview and not show up. No notice, no explanation. Again, simply dropping from sight.
  • Or the person may actually be hired but fail to show up for their first day of work. Here again, there is no warning, no communication. The person just disappears.

It’s happening more often because there is such a labor crunch. Employers are struggling more than ever to find qualified people. As a result, top people are often receiving more than one offer. They have options. And, although it may not be the most professional approach, some have a cavalier attitude toward employers, dropping them without a second thought if something better comes along.

If you are an employer, what can you do so that you don’t fall victim to ghosting? Simply put, you need to take care of your job candidates. They need to feel that the company values them and their time. They need to be treated well, just like a customer.

Communication is important. The company needs to stay in contact with candidates and keep them up to date on status status – where they stand in relation to other applicants, what comes next in the process and when, how long the whole thing is expected to take.

Companies can no longer afford to keep candidates in the dark or impose on their time by dragging out the hiring process. If a firm does this, top prospects will simply go elsewhere. It’s all about giving job candidates a good experience.

To begin with, you need to reexamine every step of the hiring process, from the time a job candidate makes first contact, through the interviewing process and onboarding.

  1. Recruiting

To prevent ghosting, you need to attract candidates who are a good fit for the job. So you need to make sure your job descriptions are current and accurately describe the kinds of skills and experience needed to be successful. Skip the boilerplate and describe what is really involved in the job.

  1. Interviewing

Hiring managers need to prepare for the interview just like candidates. First of all, hiring managers need to be clear exactly what skills, knowledge and experience they’re looking for and interview questions should reflect that so that they produce the information needed. All of the candidates should answer the same questions to provide a basis for comparison.

Hiring managers also need to ask questions about company culture and soft skills, the person’s ability to communicate, collaborate, their work ethic, and resilience.

Doing all of this will help ensure that you find candidates who are a good fit for the job and the culture, which will make it less likely that they’ll ghost you.

  1. Onboarding

The onboarding process should give new hires the orientation they need to make a good start at the company. That means welcoming them, introducing them to people in their department, reviewing the duties and expectations of the job, preparing their workspace with everything they will need, and being available to answer questions or concerns they may have.

  1. Employee engagement

Ghosting also occurs after an employee has been working with you for awhile. If you have employees who are engaged and excited about their work, there is little chance they will leave without notice (ghost). To cultivate engaged employees, you need to show you value them and their work. Younger workers, especially millennials, want frequent feedback on how they are doing and what they need to work on.

To improve employee engagement, you need to recognize employees for their work and reward it, provide opportunities for growth in their careers and offer training opportunities, such as mentoring.

All of these things will make for employees who enjoy their work, thus helping you retain them.

Have you just been ghosted? Need to “bust” that departure quickly? Then call Helpmates! We can have one of our associates with the skills you need at your location quickly….and ready to get to work! Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

How to Make Big, Career-Changing Decisions

At certain points in our lives, we are confronted with some big decisions. It could be whether to take a new job or change careers, start a business, buy a house, or move to a new location.

When facing such a challenge, it is natural to wonder about the best way to go about making a decision. Should you rely on your head or your heart, think things through as rationally as possible, or rely on your feelings? Actually, you should do both.

Carson Careers

In fact, begin the whole process by assessing how you feel about making a particular decision. Imagine taking a particular course of action and see how it makes you feel. Do you feel good about your choice, or does something not feel right about it? It is OK to trust your instincts because they may be telling you something.

  1. Clarify your decision.

The first step is to pinpoint exactly what you need to decide because the crux of your decision may not be what you think. For instance, you may be faced with a decision about taking a job in a new city but you’re not sure if the salary you’re offered will provide you a better lifestyle in your new home (or even merely the same lifestyle).

So, the actual decision here is not whether or not you want the job – you do – but whether or not it’s financially worth it to move to another area on the salary you’ve been offered.  You have to consider the cost of living new the new town and how far your new salary will go in it.

  1. Gather information.

You naturally want to gather as much information as you can about the choices available to you and the consequences of those choices. (In other words, you’ll need to research how much things cost in the new city). But you also need to be careful here because you will seldom be able to gather all the information you want. You will always be under some kind of time constraints, and often you will have to act rather than waiting for more data.

  1. Cause and effect.

Another framework to help in making decisions is to look at them in terms of cause and effect – the decisions being the cause and the consequences of that decision being the effect. Logically, this takes the form of an if-then proposition – if something is decided in a certain way, then particular effect will follow.

For example,  if your salary will go far in the new city, your life probably will be easier and if it’s not, you may regret making the career move.

  1. See the decision as the beginning of a process.

We often look at decisions as a once-and-done kind of thing, a choice that we make. And while this is true in part, we also need to look at decision making as part of a process, because every choice we make has consequences. Everything we do after making that initial decision is important as well. We need to follow through and do whatever we can to make the decision the right one.

Taking the new job in the new city question: if it turns out you discover your new salary won’t go far in the new city, but you decide to take the job anyway, you will need to figure out how to make the salary work in your new home. What additional decisions do you have to make? Can you downsize from a home to an apartment? Cook at home more? Take fewer vacations? Could you ask for more money before you even decide whether or not to take the new job?

We can make a good decision (a great, new career opportunity) but even good decisions can have poor consequences. You need to consider what the consequences might be and if you can live with them.

  1. Watch out for cognitive bias.

Cognitive biases are things like emotions, ego, and prejudices that color our thinking and get in the way of making good decisions. For example, one such inclination is called the anchoring bias. It describes the propensity we have to give more weight to the initial information we receive about something than information we get later.

In the case of whether to move or not, your first thought upon receiving the job offer is how great your new position will be and how much you’ll enjoy your new role. Once you realize your new salary won’t go as far in the new city it may not register as strongly as your initial excitement about the position.

Yet that information is important and you should recognize it as such. After all, living like a pauper day-to-day may – or may not – make up for your fabulous new position. Only you can decide that, but you need to be careful about how cognitive bias and anchoring can make you “forget” about how hard it may be actually live in the new city when you’re not working.

Bottom line: think through any big career decision carefully, from all sides, from pros and cons. Think about the what-ifs and what you’ll do if they occur.

If you’re considering a big career change – such as a complete change in careers – consider “trying” it out a bit on an assignment with Helpmates. Contact the branch location nearest you to learn more about our temporary,  temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities.

Retention in a Recession: Not Much of a Problem?

More and more economists say the U.S. is getting closer to a recession: as of about mid-August, most were predicting its start in early 2021, possibly even some time in 2020.

Santa Fe Springs Temp Agency

No matter when it comes, a recession is coming: they always do, same as the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. It’s a modern natural economic cycle.

Therefore, because it appears that one will be wending its way to us in a few months, what could it mean about employee retention?

Many people believe retention won’t be a problem. After all, recessions always mean more firing and less hiring, so employees “would be foolish” to leave a company when “every” company appears to be letting people go and not hiring new ones.

And this may be true, especially in the beginning and middle of a recession, when layoffs are rampant and the unemployment rate creeps up.

Recessions Always Come…And They Always Go

When the recovery occurs – and it definitely will – many overworked, tired, and stressed workers may start looking elsewhere: this is exactly what happened in the economic recover after the Great Recession (December 2007-June 2009).

In addition, if you weren’t a manager, hiring manager, CEO, or recruiter during the last recession, you may not have experienced how hard it was to find great employees, even though (as the link above states) companies (during the recession) were “reporting receiving as many as 1500 or more resumes in response to an ad on the national job boards. ….[Yet] we continue to hear the same message ‘where are all the good candidates?’”

What’s more, your top employees – the ones you kept during one or more layoffs – especially may decide to look elsewhere once the worst of the recession is over.

(Note: this also could benefit you, as you could end up hiring dissatisfied employees looking to leave their employer, what this post-Great Recession/2009 article dubbed a “turnover surge.”)

Bottom Line? Looming Recession or Not, Pay Attention to Retention!

Filling needed vacant positions is costly no matter how well the economy is performing. After all, recession or no recession, the current serious talent shortage will remain. Which means if you keep your top employees during a recession but let your second- and third- workers go in a reduction in force, you may wish you’d kept at least your second tier folks. Why? Because it could be quite difficult to find even good “B” players (see “where are all the good candidates?” above).

Helpmates can work with your managers and members of your HR team and create a workforce management plan that keeps productivity humming at your company no matter if the economy expands or contract.

Give a shout out to the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Why Employees Leave: It Usually IS You!

When someone breaks up with us, the usual (unspecified) reason often is couched as “It’s me, not you.”

Think back on why you may have left past employers. Was it because you disliked your colleagues? Possibly. Was the work boring? Perhaps. Was the commute too long? That’s a given here in Southern California, so congrats if you found a position a short drive away.

All of these are valid reasons for leaving a job. But the number one reason your employees tend to bail on you: they don’t feel appreciated and/or they feel disrespected. Frankly, both reasons really are two sides of the same coin: it IS you!

City of Orange Staffing

When 66 percent of employees say they would quit if they feel unappreciated, it’s time to take stock of how your company overall or you as a manager treat your team members.

Some Nationwide Employee Dissatisfaction Statistics

With unemployment still at historic lows across the country (as of August 2019), it’s really no wonder your employees are wondering if another position at another employer might be better for them. Some interesting 2019 statistics (from different employee surveys):

  • More than a third of workers are actively or “casually” looking for another job.
  • 73 percent of Generation Z workers (those about 23 or 24 and younger) reported that they left their job because it “didn’t meet their expectations.”
  • Almost half of all workers (48 percent) have left a job because it “wasn’t what they thought it would be.”
  • 68 percent of employees said they would think about leaving their current positions if they “didn’t feel supported” by “more senior employees.”
  • 81 percent of those actively looking for work said the main reason they started a job hunt was because they weren’t satisfied with their current work environment.
  • 75 percent of job hunters said the fact that they were passed over for a promotion was a big push for them to start looking elsewhere.
  • 26 percent of workers said that recognition for their efforts was one of the top three reasons why their stay with their employer, yet 17 percent said their boss/employer never recognized their work.

Some Southern California Retention Statistics

The good news for Los Angeles and Orange County area employers is that employee turnover for hourly team members actually is less than in 30 other large metro areas across the country. The region is, in fact, in the top 10 of metro regions with the longest employee tenure: 208.4 days in 2018. (Although it is sad/important to note that 208 days is only about seven months: hourly employees don’t even stay a year with their employers.)

Unemployment in Orange County was just 3.2 percent in July while it was 4.5 percent in Los Angeles County. Yet even with such a low unemployment rate, Southern California’s workers are exceedingly burnt out, with half of workers in both Los Angeles and Orange counties among the most so, according to the Orange County Register link, above.

Yet, according to the article, “locals may be sticking at a job longer than they historically would” and “despite all the chatter about a regional ‘exodus’ of population, California residents are among the nation’s least likely to move….[which] may lower turnover.”

The cost of replacing workers who quit you costs more in a tight hiring market such as today’s. That’s why it’s smart to partner with Helpmates so that you quickly can get a new worker to replace your departing employee quickly. We make sure our associates have the skills you need so that productivity remains constant while you search for a replacement…or take on our associate as your own.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more.

Helping Your Employees with Their Back-to-School Blues

Back to school is here! Children abandon playgrounds, the beach and video games and return to the classroom. It’s a big change not just for kids but for working parents as well, requiring parents to adjust their schedules for things such as taking children to school, attending parent-teacher meetings, school open houses, sporting events, and other extracurricular activities, as well as volunteering to help out with school-related activities.

Buena Park Staffing

Both parents work in about two-thirds of all households with children, and they spend more time caring for their children than earlier generations.  In a survey of 1,000 working parents, 85 percent said they were surprised by the challenges that arose when their kids returned to school, with the challenge cited by most parents as being home when their children returned from school. Other concerns included attending school activities and meeting other parents.

It’s no surprise that stress levels for parents jump when kids return to school. What makes matters even worse is that there is little allowance made by employers to help parents through this more hectic period, as surveys have shown. But there are things employers can do to assist their workers in handling the return to school, not only helping workers but themselves as well — accommodating employees helps with morale and retention.

Flexibility

One of the primary ways employers can help is by putting flexible scheduling practices in place. For many parents, flexible scheduling isn’t just something that is nice to have, but essential for them to maintain a good work-life balance, to meet their obligations to both their work and family. Flexible schedules help both employers as well as employees.

For example, flexible scheduling and allowing an employee to work remotely would enable a parent to leave work early to attend a conference with a teacher and then finish a project at home afterward.

But for flexible scheduling to work well, it requires good communication between managers and employees as workers’ schedules change depending on school events or other obligations.

Scheduling Work Events

Another way employers can accommodate parents of school-age children is by planning work events during the day, rather than after work. For example, social events such as employee happy hours, team dinners or workshops can be scheduled earlier in the day to allow parents time to pick up children from school or other school-related activities.

Instead of beginning happy hour at 5:00, companies can start at 4:00, team dinners can become team lunches, and workshops can end a little earlier.

A Culture That Values Work-Life Balance

Enabling all workers to have a healthy work-life balance is important. It helps with employee morale, productivity, and retention, and so should be a part of the company culture. Companies need to show they value a good work-life balance by incorporating events for employees and their families as part of the company operations, for example, with company picnics or holiday parties.

Communication and Feedback

To determine the effectiveness of flexible scheduling, supervisors need to solicit ongoing feedback from workers. To do this, the company can send out short surveys to employees, allowing them to respond anonymously with comments and suggestions.

Company leaders can also lend their support by showing they recognize the challenges parents face. Managers can do this through emails, even discussing how they handle the demands of parenting and school.

Need someone to come in for even just a couple of hours one or two days a week in order to help a working parent attend a school function, or stay home with a sick child? Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you, let us know the skills you need and we’ll send you a talented temporary associate!

Getting Work Done When Your Mojo is Missing

It happens to everyone: there are just some days when it feels like a slog just to get the bare minimum done at work, let alone exceed expectations. And we’re not talking about feeling ill. We’re talking about when you have the blahs, when you’re kind of burned out, when you’re just not feeling it.

Santa Fe Springs Jobs

How can you get motivated when you’re languishing in the doldrums like this? Here are a few ideas.

  1. Consider what is ahead.

Thinking about the future is always something that raises spirits. The future is always filled with promise and possibility. Think about the things you are going to do, the things you want to accomplish. Set some goals and plan how you are going to achieve those goals. This is always a good motivator.

  1. Read something motivational.

For example, you can read about a person who overcame adversity to achieve his or her goals and how the person did it. You can peruse a self-help book with ideas on how to get moving and accomplish your goals. Even reading aphorisms can be motivational. None other than Winston Churchill recommended them.

  1. Find a mentor.

A mentor is someone with a lot of experience who can help you with your own problems and career. A mentor can give you advice and encouragement on achieving your goals and overcoming your obstacles because odds are he or she faced the same thing at one time or another.

  1. Act as if.

Acting as if” means behaving as if you already had the quality or attitude you are trying to acquire. The strategy was first proposed by the philosopher and psychologist William James, the founder of a school of thought known as pragmatism.

“Act as if what you do makes a difference,” he said, adding, “It does.” Acting as if takes confidence. You have to believe in yourself, to believe you have what it takes to get the job done. If you believe in yourself, odds are you also have control over your thoughts, feelings and actions, which also means you are able to give more effort and are more persistent.

So, act as if you are motivated, and real motivation is likely to follow.

  1. Get some exercise.

This is a great way to re-energize. Exercise gets your blood pumping and gets more oxygen to your brain. It helps to enhance your mood and to think more clearly. There is no better way to get yourself out of the blahs. So take a walk or hit the gym.

  1. Meditate

You may not believe it can help, but the evidence shows it does. Many CEOs and military people meditate regularly. Like exercise it can help to reduce stress, improve your mood, and help you focus better.

  1. Get organized.

Organize your work space. Put things where they belong and clean off your desk. You will be surprised how this also will make you feel more energized. Studies have shown that people who have organized work spaces are more productive than those with messy desks.

  1. Focus on small victories.

In other words, think about not just your goals and whether you are achieving them, but whether you are making progress toward your goals. Just moving forward, making progress, is reason enough to celebrate and to give you motivation.

When you are working, don’t worry about the past or the future, but focus on the now, the present moment and determine to make the most of that moment, because everything else flows from that.

If one of your goals is finding a new position, take a look at Helpmates’ current opportunities. See one or more that look interesting? Follow application directions or contact the branch location nearest you.

Naming the Problem: Retention in a High Turnover Market

When it comes to leaving their employer, U.S. workers aren’t balking: the Work Institute (an employee retention consulting firm) in May 2018 predicted that one in four workers (or 42 million people) would opt to leave their employers that year.

Los Angeles staffing agency

Why? Mostly because workers can: a growing economy and a very low unemployment rate provide employees options when they are unhappy at work and they definitely are choosing to exercise that option.

Southern California Isn’t Immune to Employee Turnover

Workers also are leaving Los Angeles’ area businesses at a quick clip. The Los Angeles Metro Region saw 16 percent employee turnover (which was lower than the overall turnover rate in the U.S, at 19 percent). This is much higher than the 10 percent turnover rate that’s considered “good.”

However, these figures are from 2016, when the unemployment rate was 4.3 percent in LA County and 3.6 percent in Orange County.

And now? Unemployment throughout LA County in June 2019 was 4.5 percent, while Orange County’s was 3 percent that month and so we feel it’s safe to say that turnover also has increased since 2016, especially considering low unemployment has been with us for several years  now: workers feel confident employers will be vying for their attention.

Who Leaves The Most?

Younger workers tend to quit more often than older workers. This makes sense, of course because they are in career exploration mode.

Job hopping – leaving employer after employer once they’ve worked there a year or 18 months or so – is common among younger workers as they look to either find the career and/or industry they enjoy. Job hopping does tend to stop, however, as young workers see age 30 moving closer.

When Do Employees Leave?

No surprise here: a good portion (30 percent) of workers leave within 90 days of starting a new job. This holds true for all age groups. The main reason is disappointment: the worker found that the job was a poor fit and decided to leave sooner rather than later. A company’s culture as well as a really bad work experience also are reasons employees leave within a mere three months.

What Can You Do to Combat Such Quick Attrition?

Understand that job candidates have plenty of options today. Particularly in a low-unemployment region such as Southern California, many of your candidates might be weighing multiple offers and they simply won’t put up with a poor fit – because they don’t have to!

This is why it’s critical that you take your interview and onboarding processes extremely seriously. You need to dig and understand what success means to a candidate and then work hard to ensure you set them up for success from the beginning: when they first see your job posting to their first few weeks in your employ.

Employee retention in Southern California is such an important issue that we are going to discuss it in blog posts over the next few months. Our next retention post – to publish Tuesday, September 17 – will continue the discussion on why employees leave.

Until then, if you need to replace a departing employee sooner than you expected and need a substitute ASAP, contact the Helpmates office nearest you. We will quickly find someone to come in while you look for a permanent replacement. But don’t be surprised if the terrific person we bring in turns out to become that permanent placement: many of our clients end up hiring our temporary associates as they work on assignment for them.

Take a look at our industry capabilities and give us a call.

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Why Are You Interested in this Job?

This is one of the top standard job interview questions, so expect to hear it at your next interview. Employers ask it because they want to know why you want to work at their particular company, as opposed to simply doing it to make money.

Anaheim Jobs

This question also helps the hiring manager learn about your career aspirations and how the job fits into that, as well as what you know about the company.

In answering the question, there are two issues you need to address – why you want to work at this particular company, and why you want to work at this particular job at this company.

Why the Company?

In order to answer why you want to work at this particular company, you naturally need to know something about the business. That means you need to do research. There are a number of sources for this, beginning with the company website.

On the website you can find out all the basic information about the company – its history, mission, products, and recognition it has received. Check out the press releases from the company as well as the company blog if there is one. Another place to look is social media to see what you can learn about the business.

Research online as well to see what pops up in your search. Finally, can check to see if anyone in your network has information about your potential employer.

All of this research should enable you to come up with specific reasons why you want to work at the company. These reasons could relate to the reputation of the business, its leadership, the products or services it offers, its culture and values, its growth or success, or particular programs, such as its marketing efforts, community involvement or training programs.

What you need to avoid are answers that are too vague or general, things that could apply to any company, or answers that show you haven’t done your homework.

Why the Job?

You have told the hiring manager what you like about the company. Now you need to focus on why you want to work in this particular job. You have to show the hiring manager why you are the best qualified person for this job.

To formulate an answer, first take another look at the job description. What caught your interest about the job? Why did you decide to apply for it? You need to talk about what really turns you on about the job because hiring managers want to hire people who love what they do and are excited about doing it.

Your answer should also explain why you would excel at the job, what skills and knowledge you have acquired that will allow you to deliver an exceptional performance  and value. Your answer should cover both why you are interested in the job and why you would be good at it.

Again, you want to avoid answers that are too vague or general, ones that could apply to any job. You don’t want to give the hiring manager any reason to believe you only want the job because it’s available. You need to convince him or her that you are the perfect match for the position.

You need to show enthusiasm also, explaining why you find it interesting using particulars about the job. If the hiring manager senses a lack of interest, your chances of getting the job are gone.

If you need help finding the next job at which you can excel, contact the recruiters at Helpmates. We have many direct-hire, temp-to-hire and temporary assignments just waiting for your special skills. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

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