Staying Motivated During Your Job Search While in a – Hello! – Freaking Pandemic!

We don’t have to tell you that it’s rough out there: about 31.8 million plus folks are out of work nationwide (as of early July).  In fact, Los Angeles County itself had an unemployment rate of 19.4 percent in June.

So it’s understandable that, if you’ve been looking for work for two or three months, that your job search motivation might be, shall we say, “lagging” a bit.

Yes, it’s rough, but if there’s one thing to focus on, it’s this:

Anaheim recruiters

You are a job seeker of one. There’s one of you; you need just one job. Don’t worry about ALL the other people applying to the jobs available. Instead, focus just on getting the job you need.

That said, even if you’ve been looking for work for weeks with no luck, even if you feel beaten down and just can’t bear to look at a job board ever again, let alone send in an application, you definitely can get your motivation back. Here’s how.

Set short-term goals

You’ve done tough things in your past. Perhaps you’ve:

  • Given birth/gone through labor
  • Run a marathon
  • Lost 50 pounds
  • Saved up money for a new laptop (rather than put it on a credit card)

What do those things have in common? They were relatively short-lived and you looked forward to a specific outcome when you finished them. You knew “the end” was coming.

Looking for work, on the other hand, has no set timeline. You don’t know when “the end” will come. You have a goal – get a new job – but it has no set endpoint that you can control.

So set short-term goals. Goals such as:

  • You will reach out to 15 people by Friday.
  • You will apply to 15 jobs by Friday. (This is a different goal than the one above because reaching out to people is different than applying for jobs. In addition, you will tweak your resume/cover letter to be specific to each position to which you’re applying.)
  • You will post at least one comment on the LinkedIn groups to which you belong by Friday.
  • And so on.

Give yourself rewards for meeting each goal.

And we do mean EACH goal! Looking for work is hard (as you well know). It’s definitely “not fun” (putting it lightly). You definitely should celebrate when you reach a goal. You truly deserve it!

Focus on processes, not results

Your goals shouldn’t be, “I’ll get a job by the end of September.” “I’ll get 2 interviews a week in August.” Why shouldn’t you make these types of goals? Because you have no control over whether the goal will “be met.” (For example, you have no control on whether a hiring manager will call you in for an interview.) Instead, focus on what you can control: the process. Send out X resumes a week. Reach out to X people per week. And so on. Work the process and the process will work for you.

Keep looking and you WILL land a job!

It’s amazing what consistently “working the process” does when it comes to just about anything (weight loss, exercise, learning a new skill, etc.). It’s the same with the job search, no matter what the “conditions” are surrounding your efforts, setting small, process-focused goals – and meeting them – will help you get your job-search mojo back and land you a job sooner than you may think.

Helpmates has several job opportunities available right now and many of them need people to start working immediately. Take a look at our current openings and follow the instructions for applying to the ones that interest you.

Prepare Today for the Post-COVID Hiring World

Getting to a post-COVID19 world is going to take some time. Even as we gingerly make our way to reopening our economy, California has been hit with a big increase in infections and some business restrictions have been reinstated.

But whether it takes months or a year or more, the hiring scene will return to some resemblance of how it was before the pandemic.

Santa Fe Springs recruiters

Rather than wait months to prepare for that time, it’s wise for employers to start getting ready now.

Whether you’ve put hiring on hold, are hiring more than you did before March, whether you’re planning another reduction in force, or even if you’re worried that another complete shutdown is in the offing, here are some tips to help you prepare for the days when hiring returns to some semblance of normalcy.

First, some questions to ask:

  • How has the pandemic and the shutdown changed your particular hiring process? Many people have gone to a virtual interview process, but some have not. What do you see keeping and what will you change when the pandemic is behind us?
  • You undoubtedly are reading many articles such as this one that discuss what recruiting and hiring will look like post-pandemic. From your reading and discussions with others, how do you think your talent acquisition process – your sourcing, your talent pipeline management, your onboarding steps, etc. – will need to change?

Digging deeper:

  • Look at your recruitment strategies now. If you’re currently hiring, are you attracting the right candidates now? If you’re not hiring, were you attracting the right type of person before the pandemic started? Where were the roadblocks and/or weaknesses in sourcing, interviewing and onboarding and how can you fix them?
  • Technology can certainly help you now and in the future. Do you need to upgrade your video interviewing capabilities? Should you invest in some chatbot capabilities so that you can automate answers to candidates’ typical answers, thus freeing up your recruiters’ time for more important tasks? Time to purchase some resume screening software?
  • Could your recruiters themselves use some additional training or certifications so that they’re fully acclimated to recruiting/HR technology and laws?
  • What about your recruiting policies? Have you looked at them lately? Do they need updating to reflect the changes you’ve already made – and will make?
  • Are you reaching out to passive candidates? Yes, you’re probably able to choose among the best-of-the-best unemployed candidates now. But this employer’s hiring market will Connecting with – even hiring – passive candidates now so that they’ll return your emails later is a wise move.
  • Even if you’re not hiring now, keep in touch with the unemployed professionals reaching out to you now. After all, someone who contacts you even though there’s no current job opening is someone who is assertive, a hustler. Probably someone you might want on your team someday!
  • If you’re not already staying in touch with former candidates and passive candidates, invest in some regular email outreach (newsletters). If you’ve texted in the past, keep texting now. Regular communication now – even though you may not be recruiting – will pay dividends when you are.

Good candidates will become “hard to find” again

By taking the time now to look at what is and isn’t working in your current recruiting process, changing it as needed, and continuing to communicate with candidates past, present and possibly future, your company can create a great sourcing, recruiting, onboarding, and communication process now, ensuring that you’re ready for the future.

Are you getting ready for a big hiring push in the near – or far – future? Partnering with a recruiting firm now can help make that process run smoothly and effectively when you need it.

Contact Helpmates to learn how we can help with your recruiting needs now and post-COVID19.

The Skills in Demand in a Post-COVID World

The Skills in Demand in a Post-COVID World

While the COVID-19 pandemic has changed pretty much everything in our world in these past three or four months, one thing that remains the same – in many ways – are the skills employers will be looking for now and for the foreseeable future.

One would think that since so much has changed, so would desired job skills. But that’s not really the case.  What’s more, most don’t even require learning new skills; you probably already possess one or more them. (And what a relief that is!)

A few in-demand skills include:

  • Creativity, out-of-the-box thinking, an innovative mind-set.

Fullerton jobs

No schooling needed for this in-demand skill! Companies that were able to adapt to the new business reality have survived with relative ease compared to their competitors.

For example, restaurants that saw the opportunity in take-out/delivery services now certainly have a leg up as the economy reopens than do their competitors who completely shuttered.

An even better example? Mercedes-AMG-HPP moved quickly from making automobiles to making ventilators.

If you’re the type of person who sees opportunity in a challenge, who likes solving problems in new ways, and if you can show this trait to employers, you’ll be a stand-out compared to other candidates.

  • Emotional intelligence.

Most of us are, well, not ourselves right now.  Anxiety. Worry about our own and loved ones’ health. Fear about finding a good job. SO MUCH STRESS!

Candidates who have the ability to “read” others’ emotions and deal with them in caring ways are always in demand, yet especially so now.

  • Leadership.

This actually is related to emotional intelligence in that the best leaders usually possess it in spades. And if ever employers needed workers with leadership mindsets, it’s now. And you don’t have to be in management to let your leadership skills shine. Instead, anyone who can inspire co-workers, lead teammates in a collaboration project, etc. is going to be highly desirable to employers.

  • Digital skills, including coding.

Digital skills have become even more critical during the pandemic as many people have started working remotely, on computers.

Coding, in fact, is a highly desirable skill set, one that pays very well (high five figures is common).

If you don’t yet have digital skills, you can get them via credentialing online certification programs, many of which are offered by California colleges and universities. UC Berkeley has an online extension program in coding, for example, open to anyone anywhere in the world. Some coding experience is helpful but not necessary.

Put your current leadership, emotional intelligence and creative thinking skills to work now by taking a look at Helpmates’ current job opportunities. If one or more of them look interesting to you, follow the posting’s application instructions or contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Moving Beyond the “Hive Mind” When Recruiting

Bees. The golden with black stripes heroes of pollination. You no doubt have heard of their “hive mind”: the coordinated behavior they appear to exhibit, all in the benefit of the hive. It’s as if the there’s a single mind controlling each bee’s behavior. This is the “hive mind.”

Santa Ana staffing company

In recruiting, a “hive mind” is one in which recruiters and hiring managers always look for people who fill a certain mold, who have certain characteristics, have the same background, see the world in the same way.

Instead, to truly compete in 2020 and beyond, we believe your organization should search for candidates who have a mind of their own, who don’t think the same way you do, who are different.

Right now is the perfect time to expand your “perfect hire” beliefs

Many – far too many – great people are now out of work and hot in their hunts for new employment, making it easy to find people who aren’t your “typical” type of candidates who nevertheless would make terrific employees. 

Beginning the reframe

Take a look at the characteristics, backgrounds and skills of current employees you believe have the best qualifications for their positions. Remember that except for specific training for technical opportunities, job requirements most often are malleable.

As you look at your best employees, don’t worry so much about specific past jobs or past education – particularly schools attended – but more about their accomplishments. Also, look at their key characteristics: are they go-getters or are they a bit reticent? Do they work best alone or in teams? Remember, you’re not looking for specific experiences but their accomplishments and the characteristics that helped them make those accomplishments.

Ascertaining what it takes to actually succeed in a role and then looking for the particular characteristics of those successful workers, helps you change your thinking as to “what kind” of candidate will succeed.

Look for candidates who overcome obstacles and talk to them about how they thought about the challenges and what they did to overcome them.

Such people tend to those have the natural ability to roll with the punches, figure out how to overcome roadblocks and apply their past experiences to figuring out how to succeed in new situations.

Focus on transferable skills and behaviors rather than specific industry experience

For example, if an administrative assistant with considerable payroll experience was able to upgrade her previous employer’s (a regional insurance company) payroll system, surely she can manage the payroll for your furniture manufacturing enterprise?

Remember: if you’re leery of such an individual’s ability to transfer from one industry to another, robust behavioral interviews that focus on the tasks pertinent to the job can help you ascertain if they’d be a good fit. After all, past behavior almost always is an accurate predictor of future behavior.

Hiring from “outside the hive” can bring your company a competitive advantage

Diverse teams of people with different backgrounds, education, skills, and work history create diverse teams, helping employees move away from “groupthink,” encouraging your business to change outdated views that no longer serve your company and move easily into the many changes that this second decade of the second millennium no doubt will bring.

What’s more, in these weeks of massive unemployment, your company would be helping someone who’s “not perfect” in the sense of specific background or industry experience find work.

Looking for great people for your Southern California company? Helpmates has terrific specialists thoroughly vetted and well-oriented in best Covid-19 workplace practices to work on assignment for you either on-site or remotely. Contact the branch location nearest you to learn more.

 

Resume Rules for the 2020s

Technology has made work more complicated because it requires more sophisticated job skills. It’s also made looking for work more complicated because it takes longer to explain exactly what we accomplished and how.

Whittier jobs

Plus, many recruiters and HR professionals now use technology that screens resumes for certain keywords, keywords that are supposed to show a candidate has the needed experience and know-how to do the job.

Submitted resumes tend to head first to a company’s recruitment database, allowing recruiters to find several candidates with the exact skills they’re looking for in mere seconds.

And, with the pandemic making it even harder to look for work, now what?

Here’s what:

Resume Rules for the 2020s

  • Focus!

Your resume needs to be as focused as possible on the particular job to which you’re applying. Does that mean you’ll need to change up the resume for every job? Yes!

Don’t worry, you won’t need to do a complete re-write; but you do need to re-work it so that you clearly showcase the skills and background you possess that the job description requests.

  • Create a resume that speaks to both the computer algorithm’s and the recruiters/hiring manager’s needs.

How to do so? Make the resume’s first page all about the position’s needs, such as skills and education/experience background. Doing so will help it rank higher in the recruiter’s search results because the keywords that describe your job skills and education, etc., often are the same keywords the company’s computer looks for.

You also should have a descriptive phrase at the beginning of that first page that “tells a story” about how you can do the job.

Doing so helps draw the recruiter in and helps make the argument that your resume is one to look at, thus encouraging the recruiter to read your resume carefully.

  • The “resumes should be one-page only, unless you have a LOT of experience” rule really no longer applies.

Not that you should pack everything into your resume. No. But if you have a lot of experience that’s applicable to the job opening and you can stay focused on showcasing how that experience and skills applies to this job (and you edit that experience tightly), a two- or even three-page resume should be fine.

Here’s why: leaving out relevant keywords and information could mean the database algorithm misses your resume and you’ll thus have less of a chance of it being read and – most importantly – “selling” whoever reads it on your skills.

Don’t worry: recruiters are happy to read “long” resumes…so long as they provide value.

Bottom line: the key to resume success in 2020 is to include appropriate keywords AND making it easy for a recruiter/hiring manager to see how you’ll provide value and help the company solve the problems the position is supposed to solve.

Most people don’t know how to do this. But you now do. So move ahead: create a resume that does that and you’ll have a leg up on other people applying for the same position!

Helpmates always is looking for great people to work on assignment with our clients. Take a look at our current opportunities and, if one or more look interesting, follow the listing’s instructions to apply.

 

Putting Candidates at Ease During a Social-Distanced Interview

If you’re one of the many Southern California employers that are starting to bring employees back to corporate offices and other on-site locations, you may need or want to hire new employees.

Los Angeles recruiters

While many employers have decided to continue interviewing via video conferencing, you may decide you want – or need – to interview candidates in person.

This, naturally, could make some candidates nervous. After all, most people understand how contagious the virus that causes the SARS-CoV-2 disease is and may be worried they could a) be exposed to the virus or b) pass the virus on to their interviewer under the chance that they or the interviewer could have the virus but be asymptomatic (showing no symptoms).

Making the decision to interview candidates in-person. Or not.

Every employer has different needs. You may be comfortable hiring with video-only interviews, or you may have decided you really need to see someone in person to get a true “feel” for their personality. After all, it isn’t as easy to evaluate a candidate’s personality traits in a video interview as it is in a “real-life” interview.

So if you have decided to bring candidates in for in-person interviews, here are some tips to help both you and the candidate feel safe…and have a productive, positive interview experience.

  • Naturally, you’re going to have to make sure your location meets – or exceeds – the CDC’s guidelines for making sure your workplace is safe for conducting business on-site.

The CDC offers guidance to reopening business on how to ensure your facility is clean/sanitized and is configured so that workers may properly social distance while at work.

  • Offer candidates written interview guidelines so that they know what to expect.

Will you require masks? If so, what can a candidate expect if they refuse to wear one (or can’t, for medical reasons)? What are you going to do about handshakes before and after the interview? Will candidates be allowed in restrooms? Will you be providing an office/site tour? Will the candidate meet with one or more people?

The idea is that these guidelines will give candidates information about what to expect at the interview location. Providing them with the “logistics” of their interview can help alleviate concerns and help put candidates at ease.

  • If you decide to have in-person interviews, will you allow candidates to request a video interview (in case they are leery of coming in for an on-site interview)?

This is a legitimate question for at least two reasons. One, people have varying tolerance for risk and – especially if the job will performed remotely – may simply be too nervous to come to your location for an interview.

However (reason two), if the job will be performed on-site – even if only a few days a week or month – how will you decide to look at the candidate’s virtual-interview request? Is it a deal-breaker for you? If not, and you want to grant the candidate’s request for a virtual interview, you’re going to have to come to sort of agreement about working on-site with the candidate if they become your employee.

  • Give candidates clear details as to what next steps are.

Employers should do this for all interviews, pandemic or no pandemic. However, it’s especially important now due to the uncertainty about, well, everything.

For example, it’s probably a good idea to give the candidate an estimate as to when a decision may be made and that a hiring choice could take longer than usual due to current circumstances. If that’s the case, it’s a really courteous move if you encourage the candidate to feel free to reach out to you if they haven’t heard from you in some capacity within a certain number of days.

If you need workers oriented and prepared in COVID-19 best workplace safety practices, contact Helpmates’ Rosalie Villa, our chief revenue officer, at 949-225-5016 or via email at rvilla@helpmates.com.

Using Your Layoff to Change Careers

If you’re among the 40 million-plus people in the U.S. who have been laid off or furloughed by your employer, you may be thinking that if ever there was a good time to change careers, this might be it.

Cerritos careers

And you could be right.

Could be, because deciding to change careers is such a big, life-altering move that it’s definitely not something you should undertake impulsively. This is especially so if the main reason you’re making the switch is because of the trauma of your job loss.

However, if you’ve been deeply unhappy with your career choice for months or years, this time could be the push you’ve needed to take a new plunge.

Career-change strategies during a pandemic

If you’ve looked deeply into your reasons for wanting a change and have decided to go for it, here’s a step-by-step plan to help you successfully transform your life.

  1. If you haven’t yet decided what career you want to pursue, do some soul-searching.

What do you dislike about your current career? We don’t mean about your current (past) job, but the career itself. For example, perhaps you don’t like your co-workers. You will have unlikeable co-workers wherever you work so you need to take a deep dive into why you don’t like them: perhaps the career tends to attract people with whom you just don’t click. This is unlikely, but it’s good to do a gut-check.

What aspects of the career drive you bonkers? Perhaps it’s one that requires long hours and you want to have more time for your personal life? Perhaps it doesn’t pay much and you’re tired of a “ramen noodle” lifestyle.

  1. Will you need to learn new skills to pursue the new career you choose?

For example, perhaps you love practicing law, but you don’t like corporate law and you’d rather work in a human rights organization. (Note: this type of career change will be easier than most because the skills you use in both are the same.)

But if you’re moving from say, human resources to healthcare, you’re going to need to learn new skills (unless you wish to look for HR work in a healthcare setting).

  1. How will your current skills help the new profession?

Remember, employers hire people to solve problems. To make the change you’re going to need to convince a hiring manager that the skills you’ve used in your previous career will transfer easily – and provide value – to your new career.

As an easy example: let’s say you’re a journalist looking to move into marketing. Your writing skills should be relatively easy to transfer to marketing. Still, journalistic writing is different than marketing writing and you may want to put together some marketing writing samples to showcase your skills.

Another example: you’ve worked as a restaurant manager for several years and you’re hoping to move to non-profit advocacy. Come up with examples of how your management skills could help a non-profit. Could you use those skills in volunteer management, for example?

  1. Start networking with people in the new industry.

And now that the pandemic has made in-person networking almost impossible, the place to start networking is on LinkedIn.

A great way to start your networking/job search is to identify companies in the new career at which you’d like to work. Check a business’ company page (and website) and see if you can identify people who might be in a position to hire someone with your skills.

If these people are second connections, you can ask for a connection (mention the person who connects you). Once a connection is accepted, you can then message the person about your interest in changing careers and if they’d be willing to speak with you about opportunities. (Note: we’re not advising at this point that you send a resume unasked or ask if you can send it. Wait until asked yourself.)

When people do agree to chat with you – and at least a few will – ask for information about the career, what they love and hate about it, etc. And then ask them if there is anyone else they could recommend you speak with.

(They may ask for your resume; if so, send it. However – and once again – don’t ask if you can send it).

Continuing doing this and over time you will have people asking for your resume, telling you about job openings, even telling you they would like to interview you for an opening.

  1. Understand that you may need to take a step down the career ladder as well as a pay cut.

Unless your skills transfer perfectly to the new career, you may have to take a position one or two levels “below” your role in your previous career, as well as a pay cut (due to the “lesser” position).

Aim to look at this as the price you pay for a happier work life (and possibly personal life). As you prove yourself in the new career, the promotions and pay raises will come along.

If your job/career has been upended due to the economic downturn caused by COVID-19, Helpmates has many temporary, temp-to-hire and even direct-hire opportunities available right now. Take a look at our current openings and, if one or more appear to be a good fit, follow directions for applying.

 

Motivating Passive Candidates When It’s Damn Scary “Out There”

Getting passive candidates to move from their current employer to your company is difficult in the best of times; it’s exceedingly so during a pandemic. After all, even though companies are still laying off workers – or even shutting down altogether – great employees are understandably loathe to take a risk and move right now.

Fullerton recruiters

Still, it is possible to get candidates motivated enough to change employers. Here’s how:

  • Find out what means enough to them to make a move.

That is, what are the benefits, job duties, perks, career dreams, and more that mean the most to them and how can your company make sure the candidate will get them if they become your employee?

Are they looking for more PTO, flextime or continuing education opportunities (such as employer-paid graduate school)?

If moving to your firm means a promotion, how much of a promotion is it in their eyes? Is one step up the ladder not enough? Could you revamp the job so that it’s at least two steps up?

  • Be completely open and honest regarding your company’s current health.

Naturally, passive candidates are going to want to know how robust your business is before jumping ship. If ever there was a good time to be as transparent as possible, now is it. Discuss layoffs or furloughs already completed and any plans you may have for more in the future.

As candidates ask questions – and they definitely will! – make sure you’re as above board and candid as possible. If you not sure about something, say so.

Finally, if the candidate is so terrific and/or the position being filled is so critical to the company’s success, consider the option of providing the candidate with a “no layoff or furlough” promise (in writing), but only if you feel strongly that you won’t have them in the future. (You’ll want to make sure at least one attorney reads the document, of course.)

  • Understand it may take longer to woo passive candidates.

Trepidation about making a job move is more than understandable right now. Don’t be surprised if you’ll spend more time talking with candidates and encouraging/allaying fears. Schedule virtual coffee meetings. Be open to taking candidates’ “on the fly” calls, emails or texts. Let them talk about all their concerns; don’t be surprised if you answer the same questions more than once.

Depending on the position, consider having members of the C-suite engage with candidates. Ask employees who would become the candidates’ co-workers – or even subordinates – to reach out and engage with your potential new-hires.

Passive candidates often are the best workers at their current employer….

…and they understandably are leery of making a move now. Look at recruiting passive candidates as more a relationship-building exercise rather than recruiting. Let them get to know and become interested in your company and what you have to offer that their current employer does not. You probably won’t be able to go into the courtship with a “quick score” mentality and will instead need to nurture their candidacy while growing their trust and allaying their fears.

Helpmates can be your partner in your search for passive candidates for your direct-hire opportunities. Contact the branch nearest your Southern California business to learn how we attract, recruit and vet top talent.

Landing Your First Job Out of College – During a Pandemic!

Talk about rotten luck! To be a newly minted college graduate in 2020 means you’re headed to job market unlike anything you, your parents and possibly even your grandparents have ever seen before. Many people are likening the current job market worldwide to that of the Depression in the 1930s, in which one out of four people in the U.S. were out of work. In fact, Forbes in April reported that already 23 percent of the U.S. workforce was out of work.

We truly are sorry that you’re graduating into THIS!

La Mirada careers

But….something to keep in mind as you move forward: you are one person. You need just one job. Don’t focus on what you can’t control: how many other people are looking for work, competing with you. Instead, focus on getting you – your singular self – that one job.

Yes, it will be a lot harder this year than it was for your friends who graduated last year. Nothing can be done about that (that’s something you can’t control).

Remember: focus on what you can control…

…your attitude and your actions.

Looking for work now means it should take up most of your time and efforts. Yes, enjoy summer as much as you can, but you really should take up this old-timey mantra: “looking for work IS my job” until you land one.

That means concentrated effort of at least four or five hours a day.

Most of your job search will take place online

There’s no need to worry right now about attending career fairs or networking events in person. Job search sites, asking friends and family for leads and LinkedIn are the three “tools” you’ll use predominately in your search as we all deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and it’s “stay at home as much as possible” guidelines.

A big caveat: Do NOT simply find jobs on job boards and apply there. That really isn’t a job search: it’s merely “hitting send.”

Instead, by far the best thing you can do right now is start connecting and networking on LinkedIn. There’s a ton of great advice about how to do so strategically. Here’s a how-to we really like. (Bonus: it’s written for college grads.)

You not only can apply to jobs on the platform but you should/must start reaching out and engaging with your contacts there.

The right way to engage on LinkedIn

Take a look at your LinkedIn feed: you’ll see that many people link to articles and such. But you’ll also see that they comment on the articles. They also comment on their connection’s updates.

Most importantly, the most successful LinkedIn users tend to post updates on their own profiles that provide value to others. They offer a well-thought-out opinion about something. They provide advice about their industry. In other words, they give to get.

Don’t be shy

You may feel that you have little to offer. You may think you don’t have enough experience to provide information that’s of any value.

You are wrong.

Everyone has something of value to add. Everyone. Whether it’s an inbound marketing tip you learned as a digital marketing major, or your thoughts on an article that predicts when the recession may lift (based on your studies as an economics major), post it.

Regular posting and commenting helps people your connections see your expertise up close. Recruiters also will see your comments and take note.

Speaking of recruiters….

Feel free to follow – and ask for connections with – those who recruit in the industry in which you’re job hunting. Reach out and ask for a connection. Ask if you can send them your resume (don’t do so until you’re an actual connection).

Continue to engage professionally with your connections. Continue to offer value in all interactions, as well as in your updates and comments on other people’s updates.

One last LinkedIn tip: just as we advised re job boards, above, don’t simply apply to openings you see posted on LinkedIn and call it a job search. Instead, most of your time on the platform should be spent asking for connections, posting your own updates and commenting on the updates of others.

Times are tough out there for many job seekers. Here at Helpmates we’d love to help you find your first post-college job. Check out our current opportunities and apply to those that appeal to you. You also can contact the branch office nearest you to register with us.

Motivating a Remote Workforce: 4 Strategies

By the time you read this, we’ll be almost three months from the start of safe-at-home orders and also well on our way to seeing Southern California “reopen.”

Yet many companies will still be asking employees to work from home. Because their team members have been working remotely for weeks now, managers no doubt have the management part down pretty well.

But what about motivating remote workers?

The “adventure” of working from home wore off long ago. Many people also are managing young children while working and – as summer approaches – may no longer need to supervise their schoolwork, but will have to figure out how to wrangle their children during a summer with “nothing to do.”

Cypress staffing

Even your employees without children no doubt are well into the work-from-home doldrums: tired of Zoom. Tired of working from the kitchen table. Tired of not having in-person interactions. Tired of not heading out with the gang to lunch. Fed up with #doomscrolling the Internet during breaks.

Work-from-home exhaustion is a real thing. If you’ve noticed that your workers – or even yourself – are less motivated than normal, is it really any wonder?

Motivating remote workers: 4 strategies

  1. Create routines. That could mean regularly scheduled meetings.

Yes, this means yet more video meetings! But when working from home – which often means employees have a lot more flexibility as to when they get work done – having set meetings and/or check-ins truly can help provide your employees with a sense of normalcy.

Regularly scheduled meetings also help employees stay on track regarding deadlines and helps keep communication among team managers flowing.

  1. Speaking of communication, make sure you do so regularly. And possibly more often than you “normally” do.

Remote work can be quite isolating, especially if employees don’t hear from management/leadership. Make sure everyone on your team knows your priorities because doing so helps them understand the ultimate reasons for their work while helping them stay productive. What’s more – and perhaps most importantly – regular communication, whether in formal email memos or simple quick messages or even calls – reassures members of your team that their efforts are valued.

Understand that good communication needs to go both ways. Welcome messages and input from everyone, no matter where they are on the org chart. You’ll be amazed at the great insights that come from diverse perspectives. This will only help nurture better communications and help your employees achieve their goals.

  1. Set a regular “quitting time” for the day and stick to it.

No doubt you and your workers have found how “easy” it is to work just about any time of day…or night. Chances also are good you – and your employees – may find yourself working 10 or even 12 or more hours a day because you can, a true recipe for quick burnout.

Making – and keeping – set work hours helps prevent days from melding into each other and helps you and your workers have true “work time” as well as real “downtime,” delineations that have become ever more critical for optimum health and productivity.

  1. Stay positive and create a culture of support.

Forrester Research has found that workplace culture is one of the most critical parts of a successful remote work strategy because workers who feel they can be who they really are and who believe they truly are part of a supportive team are more likely to feel motivated.

Showing compassion and concern for everyone you work with while also remaining positive as their leader is absolutely the best course to follow in these unusual times.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information on our staffing/recruiting services. You also may call our corporate office at 949-752-6888.

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