Resume Rules for the 2020s

Technology has made work more complicated because it requires more sophisticated job skills. It’s also made looking for work more complicated because it takes longer to explain exactly what we accomplished and how.

Whittier jobs

Plus, many recruiters and HR professionals now use technology that screens resumes for certain keywords, keywords that are supposed to show a candidate has the needed experience and know-how to do the job.

Submitted resumes tend to head first to a company’s recruitment database, allowing recruiters to find several candidates with the exact skills they’re looking for in mere seconds.

And, with the pandemic making it even harder to look for work, now what?

Here’s what:

Resume Rules for the 2020s

  • Focus!

Your resume needs to be as focused as possible on the particular job to which you’re applying. Does that mean you’ll need to change up the resume for every job? Yes!

Don’t worry, you won’t need to do a complete re-write; but you do need to re-work it so that you clearly showcase the skills and background you possess that the job description requests.

  • Create a resume that speaks to both the computer algorithm’s and the recruiters/hiring manager’s needs.

How to do so? Make the resume’s first page all about the position’s needs, such as skills and education/experience background. Doing so will help it rank higher in the recruiter’s search results because the keywords that describe your job skills and education, etc., often are the same keywords the company’s computer looks for.

You also should have a descriptive phrase at the beginning of that first page that “tells a story” about how you can do the job.

Doing so helps draw the recruiter in and helps make the argument that your resume is one to look at, thus encouraging the recruiter to read your resume carefully.

  • The “resumes should be one-page only, unless you have a LOT of experience” rule really no longer applies.

Not that you should pack everything into your resume. No. But if you have a lot of experience that’s applicable to the job opening and you can stay focused on showcasing how that experience and skills applies to this job (and you edit that experience tightly), a two- or even three-page resume should be fine.

Here’s why: leaving out relevant keywords and information could mean the database algorithm misses your resume and you’ll thus have less of a chance of it being read and – most importantly – “selling” whoever reads it on your skills.

Don’t worry: recruiters are happy to read “long” resumes…so long as they provide value.

Bottom line: the key to resume success in 2020 is to include appropriate keywords AND making it easy for a recruiter/hiring manager to see how you’ll provide value and help the company solve the problems the position is supposed to solve.

Most people don’t know how to do this. But you now do. So move ahead: create a resume that does that and you’ll have a leg up on other people applying for the same position!

Helpmates always is looking for great people to work on assignment with our clients. Take a look at our current opportunities and, if one or more look interesting, follow the listing’s instructions to apply.

 

Putting Candidates at Ease During a Social-Distanced Interview

If you’re one of the many Southern California employers that are starting to bring employees back to corporate offices and other on-site locations, you may need or want to hire new employees.

Los Angeles recruiters

While many employers have decided to continue interviewing via video conferencing, you may decide you want – or need – to interview candidates in person.

This, naturally, could make some candidates nervous. After all, most people understand how contagious the virus that causes the SARS-CoV-2 disease is and may be worried they could a) be exposed to the virus or b) pass the virus on to their interviewer under the chance that they or the interviewer could have the virus but be asymptomatic (showing no symptoms).

Making the decision to interview candidates in-person. Or not.

Every employer has different needs. You may be comfortable hiring with video-only interviews, or you may have decided you really need to see someone in person to get a true “feel” for their personality. After all, it isn’t as easy to evaluate a candidate’s personality traits in a video interview as it is in a “real-life” interview.

So if you have decided to bring candidates in for in-person interviews, here are some tips to help both you and the candidate feel safe…and have a productive, positive interview experience.

  • Naturally, you’re going to have to make sure your location meets – or exceeds – the CDC’s guidelines for making sure your workplace is safe for conducting business on-site.

The CDC offers guidance to reopening business on how to ensure your facility is clean/sanitized and is configured so that workers may properly social distance while at work.

  • Offer candidates written interview guidelines so that they know what to expect.

Will you require masks? If so, what can a candidate expect if they refuse to wear one (or can’t, for medical reasons)? What are you going to do about handshakes before and after the interview? Will candidates be allowed in restrooms? Will you be providing an office/site tour? Will the candidate meet with one or more people?

The idea is that these guidelines will give candidates information about what to expect at the interview location. Providing them with the “logistics” of their interview can help alleviate concerns and help put candidates at ease.

  • If you decide to have in-person interviews, will you allow candidates to request a video interview (in case they are leery of coming in for an on-site interview)?

This is a legitimate question for at least two reasons. One, people have varying tolerance for risk and – especially if the job will performed remotely – may simply be too nervous to come to your location for an interview.

However (reason two), if the job will be performed on-site – even if only a few days a week or month – how will you decide to look at the candidate’s virtual-interview request? Is it a deal-breaker for you? If not, and you want to grant the candidate’s request for a virtual interview, you’re going to have to come to sort of agreement about working on-site with the candidate if they become your employee.

  • Give candidates clear details as to what next steps are.

Employers should do this for all interviews, pandemic or no pandemic. However, it’s especially important now due to the uncertainty about, well, everything.

For example, it’s probably a good idea to give the candidate an estimate as to when a decision may be made and that a hiring choice could take longer than usual due to current circumstances. If that’s the case, it’s a really courteous move if you encourage the candidate to feel free to reach out to you if they haven’t heard from you in some capacity within a certain number of days.

If you need workers oriented and prepared in COVID-19 best workplace safety practices, contact Helpmates’ Rosalie Villa, our chief revenue officer, at 949-225-5016 or via email at rvilla@helpmates.com.

Using Your Layoff to Change Careers

If you’re among the 40 million-plus people in the U.S. who have been laid off or furloughed by your employer, you may be thinking that if ever there was a good time to change careers, this might be it.

Cerritos careers

And you could be right.

Could be, because deciding to change careers is such a big, life-altering move that it’s definitely not something you should undertake impulsively. This is especially so if the main reason you’re making the switch is because of the trauma of your job loss.

However, if you’ve been deeply unhappy with your career choice for months or years, this time could be the push you’ve needed to take a new plunge.

Career-change strategies during a pandemic

If you’ve looked deeply into your reasons for wanting a change and have decided to go for it, here’s a step-by-step plan to help you successfully transform your life.

  1. If you haven’t yet decided what career you want to pursue, do some soul-searching.

What do you dislike about your current career? We don’t mean about your current (past) job, but the career itself. For example, perhaps you don’t like your co-workers. You will have unlikeable co-workers wherever you work so you need to take a deep dive into why you don’t like them: perhaps the career tends to attract people with whom you just don’t click. This is unlikely, but it’s good to do a gut-check.

What aspects of the career drive you bonkers? Perhaps it’s one that requires long hours and you want to have more time for your personal life? Perhaps it doesn’t pay much and you’re tired of a “ramen noodle” lifestyle.

  1. Will you need to learn new skills to pursue the new career you choose?

For example, perhaps you love practicing law, but you don’t like corporate law and you’d rather work in a human rights organization. (Note: this type of career change will be easier than most because the skills you use in both are the same.)

But if you’re moving from say, human resources to healthcare, you’re going to need to learn new skills (unless you wish to look for HR work in a healthcare setting).

  1. How will your current skills help the new profession?

Remember, employers hire people to solve problems. To make the change you’re going to need to convince a hiring manager that the skills you’ve used in your previous career will transfer easily – and provide value – to your new career.

As an easy example: let’s say you’re a journalist looking to move into marketing. Your writing skills should be relatively easy to transfer to marketing. Still, journalistic writing is different than marketing writing and you may want to put together some marketing writing samples to showcase your skills.

Another example: you’ve worked as a restaurant manager for several years and you’re hoping to move to non-profit advocacy. Come up with examples of how your management skills could help a non-profit. Could you use those skills in volunteer management, for example?

  1. Start networking with people in the new industry.

And now that the pandemic has made in-person networking almost impossible, the place to start networking is on LinkedIn.

A great way to start your networking/job search is to identify companies in the new career at which you’d like to work. Check a business’ company page (and website) and see if you can identify people who might be in a position to hire someone with your skills.

If these people are second connections, you can ask for a connection (mention the person who connects you). Once a connection is accepted, you can then message the person about your interest in changing careers and if they’d be willing to speak with you about opportunities. (Note: we’re not advising at this point that you send a resume unasked or ask if you can send it. Wait until asked yourself.)

When people do agree to chat with you – and at least a few will – ask for information about the career, what they love and hate about it, etc. And then ask them if there is anyone else they could recommend you speak with.

(They may ask for your resume; if so, send it. However – and once again – don’t ask if you can send it).

Continuing doing this and over time you will have people asking for your resume, telling you about job openings, even telling you they would like to interview you for an opening.

  1. Understand that you may need to take a step down the career ladder as well as a pay cut.

Unless your skills transfer perfectly to the new career, you may have to take a position one or two levels “below” your role in your previous career, as well as a pay cut (due to the “lesser” position).

Aim to look at this as the price you pay for a happier work life (and possibly personal life). As you prove yourself in the new career, the promotions and pay raises will come along.

If your job/career has been upended due to the economic downturn caused by COVID-19, Helpmates has many temporary, temp-to-hire and even direct-hire opportunities available right now. Take a look at our current openings and, if one or more appear to be a good fit, follow directions for applying.

 

Motivating Passive Candidates When It’s Damn Scary “Out There”

Getting passive candidates to move from their current employer to your company is difficult in the best of times; it’s exceedingly so during a pandemic. After all, even though companies are still laying off workers – or even shutting down altogether – great employees are understandably loathe to take a risk and move right now.

Fullerton recruiters

Still, it is possible to get candidates motivated enough to change employers. Here’s how:

  • Find out what means enough to them to make a move.

That is, what are the benefits, job duties, perks, career dreams, and more that mean the most to them and how can your company make sure the candidate will get them if they become your employee?

Are they looking for more PTO, flextime or continuing education opportunities (such as employer-paid graduate school)?

If moving to your firm means a promotion, how much of a promotion is it in their eyes? Is one step up the ladder not enough? Could you revamp the job so that it’s at least two steps up?

  • Be completely open and honest regarding your company’s current health.

Naturally, passive candidates are going to want to know how robust your business is before jumping ship. If ever there was a good time to be as transparent as possible, now is it. Discuss layoffs or furloughs already completed and any plans you may have for more in the future.

As candidates ask questions – and they definitely will! – make sure you’re as above board and candid as possible. If you not sure about something, say so.

Finally, if the candidate is so terrific and/or the position being filled is so critical to the company’s success, consider the option of providing the candidate with a “no layoff or furlough” promise (in writing), but only if you feel strongly that you won’t have them in the future. (You’ll want to make sure at least one attorney reads the document, of course.)

  • Understand it may take longer to woo passive candidates.

Trepidation about making a job move is more than understandable right now. Don’t be surprised if you’ll spend more time talking with candidates and encouraging/allaying fears. Schedule virtual coffee meetings. Be open to taking candidates’ “on the fly” calls, emails or texts. Let them talk about all their concerns; don’t be surprised if you answer the same questions more than once.

Depending on the position, consider having members of the C-suite engage with candidates. Ask employees who would become the candidates’ co-workers – or even subordinates – to reach out and engage with your potential new-hires.

Passive candidates often are the best workers at their current employer….

…and they understandably are leery of making a move now. Look at recruiting passive candidates as more a relationship-building exercise rather than recruiting. Let them get to know and become interested in your company and what you have to offer that their current employer does not. You probably won’t be able to go into the courtship with a “quick score” mentality and will instead need to nurture their candidacy while growing their trust and allaying their fears.

Helpmates can be your partner in your search for passive candidates for your direct-hire opportunities. Contact the branch nearest your Southern California business to learn how we attract, recruit and vet top talent.

Landing Your First Job Out of College – During a Pandemic!

Talk about rotten luck! To be a newly minted college graduate in 2020 means you’re headed to job market unlike anything you, your parents and possibly even your grandparents have ever seen before. Many people are likening the current job market worldwide to that of the Depression in the 1930s, in which one out of four people in the U.S. were out of work. In fact, Forbes in April reported that already 23 percent of the U.S. workforce was out of work.

We truly are sorry that you’re graduating into THIS!

La Mirada careers

But….something to keep in mind as you move forward: you are one person. You need just one job. Don’t focus on what you can’t control: how many other people are looking for work, competing with you. Instead, focus on getting you – your singular self – that one job.

Yes, it will be a lot harder this year than it was for your friends who graduated last year. Nothing can be done about that (that’s something you can’t control).

Remember: focus on what you can control…

…your attitude and your actions.

Looking for work now means it should take up most of your time and efforts. Yes, enjoy summer as much as you can, but you really should take up this old-timey mantra: “looking for work IS my job” until you land one.

That means concentrated effort of at least four or five hours a day.

Most of your job search will take place online

There’s no need to worry right now about attending career fairs or networking events in person. Job search sites, asking friends and family for leads and LinkedIn are the three “tools” you’ll use predominately in your search as we all deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and it’s “stay at home as much as possible” guidelines.

A big caveat: Do NOT simply find jobs on job boards and apply there. That really isn’t a job search: it’s merely “hitting send.”

Instead, by far the best thing you can do right now is start connecting and networking on LinkedIn. There’s a ton of great advice about how to do so strategically. Here’s a how-to we really like. (Bonus: it’s written for college grads.)

You not only can apply to jobs on the platform but you should/must start reaching out and engaging with your contacts there.

The right way to engage on LinkedIn

Take a look at your LinkedIn feed: you’ll see that many people link to articles and such. But you’ll also see that they comment on the articles. They also comment on their connection’s updates.

Most importantly, the most successful LinkedIn users tend to post updates on their own profiles that provide value to others. They offer a well-thought-out opinion about something. They provide advice about their industry. In other words, they give to get.

Don’t be shy

You may feel that you have little to offer. You may think you don’t have enough experience to provide information that’s of any value.

You are wrong.

Everyone has something of value to add. Everyone. Whether it’s an inbound marketing tip you learned as a digital marketing major, or your thoughts on an article that predicts when the recession may lift (based on your studies as an economics major), post it.

Regular posting and commenting helps people your connections see your expertise up close. Recruiters also will see your comments and take note.

Speaking of recruiters….

Feel free to follow – and ask for connections with – those who recruit in the industry in which you’re job hunting. Reach out and ask for a connection. Ask if you can send them your resume (don’t do so until you’re an actual connection).

Continue to engage professionally with your connections. Continue to offer value in all interactions, as well as in your updates and comments on other people’s updates.

One last LinkedIn tip: just as we advised re job boards, above, don’t simply apply to openings you see posted on LinkedIn and call it a job search. Instead, most of your time on the platform should be spent asking for connections, posting your own updates and commenting on the updates of others.

Times are tough out there for many job seekers. Here at Helpmates we’d love to help you find your first post-college job. Check out our current opportunities and apply to those that appeal to you. You also can contact the branch office nearest you to register with us.

Motivating a Remote Workforce: 4 Strategies

By the time you read this, we’ll be almost three months from the start of safe-at-home orders and also well on our way to seeing Southern California “reopen.”

Yet many companies will still be asking employees to work from home. Because their team members have been working remotely for weeks now, managers no doubt have the management part down pretty well.

But what about motivating remote workers?

The “adventure” of working from home wore off long ago. Many people also are managing young children while working and – as summer approaches – may no longer need to supervise their schoolwork, but will have to figure out how to wrangle their children during a summer with “nothing to do.”

Cypress staffing

Even your employees without children no doubt are well into the work-from-home doldrums: tired of Zoom. Tired of working from the kitchen table. Tired of not having in-person interactions. Tired of not heading out with the gang to lunch. Fed up with #doomscrolling the Internet during breaks.

Work-from-home exhaustion is a real thing. If you’ve noticed that your workers – or even yourself – are less motivated than normal, is it really any wonder?

Motivating remote workers: 4 strategies

  1. Create routines. That could mean regularly scheduled meetings.

Yes, this means yet more video meetings! But when working from home – which often means employees have a lot more flexibility as to when they get work done – having set meetings and/or check-ins truly can help provide your employees with a sense of normalcy.

Regularly scheduled meetings also help employees stay on track regarding deadlines and helps keep communication among team managers flowing.

  1. Speaking of communication, make sure you do so regularly. And possibly more often than you “normally” do.

Remote work can be quite isolating, especially if employees don’t hear from management/leadership. Make sure everyone on your team knows your priorities because doing so helps them understand the ultimate reasons for their work while helping them stay productive. What’s more – and perhaps most importantly – regular communication, whether in formal email memos or simple quick messages or even calls – reassures members of your team that their efforts are valued.

Understand that good communication needs to go both ways. Welcome messages and input from everyone, no matter where they are on the org chart. You’ll be amazed at the great insights that come from diverse perspectives. This will only help nurture better communications and help your employees achieve their goals.

  1. Set a regular “quitting time” for the day and stick to it.

No doubt you and your workers have found how “easy” it is to work just about any time of day…or night. Chances also are good you – and your employees – may find yourself working 10 or even 12 or more hours a day because you can, a true recipe for quick burnout.

Making – and keeping – set work hours helps prevent days from melding into each other and helps you and your workers have true “work time” as well as real “downtime,” delineations that have become ever more critical for optimum health and productivity.

  1. Stay positive and create a culture of support.

Forrester Research has found that workplace culture is one of the most critical parts of a successful remote work strategy because workers who feel they can be who they really are and who believe they truly are part of a supportive team are more likely to feel motivated.

Showing compassion and concern for everyone you work with while also remaining positive as their leader is absolutely the best course to follow in these unusual times.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information on our staffing/recruiting services. You also may call our corporate office at 949-752-6888.

Building a Company Culture with Remote Workers

At the risk of using a platitude that is becoming (frankly) more and more clichéd, your employees need you to be their rock more than ever in these unprecedented times.

This particularly is so if a good portion – if not all – of your workers work remotely.

But there’s the problem: how to exude empathy and provide that stability and feeling of normalcy when your employees don’t work on-site. What’s more, without this feeling of solidity, is your entire company culture at risk? How can employees feel “a part of something larger than themselves” when their day-to-day lives are spent mostly with just themselves?

Garden Grove staffing

Maintaining company culture with a remote workforce

  • First step: send out a memo or a website link that reminds your employees what your company’s values are.

Doing so reminds workers what your business stands for and can help them remember why they joined your firm. Seeing your business’ values in black and white also will help guide them as they move forward over the next few weeks and even months.

  • Regularly ask your employees what’s working for them as they toil remotely.

Use their feedback as a chance to learn from them and take their recommends to heart, if possible.

  • Don’t be afraid to ask every now and then if they feel less connected to your company’s mission and/or leadership.

You may want to ask these questions via private video meetings, so that workers feel comfortable speaking truthfully (and so that you can counsel them privately should they be struggling with issues of a more personal nature).

It’s also a great idea to make sure that you keep these types of two-way communications (either private or public) among workers, managers and even members of your company’s C-suite for the foreseeable future.

  • Showing kindness to everyone in your organization is key to creating a warm and motivating corporate culture.

The more your company’s leadership “show up” as sensitive, thoughtful, transparent/truthful, productive, and optimistic, the more all of your employees will “show up” the same. Everyone will remember this ethos, the acts of kindness, etc. for a long time to come and it will help all secure this type of “brand” firmly in everyone’s minds.

To help ensure that all of your stake holders (employees, managers, leadership team, investors/stock holders, perhaps even your vendors and customers) act in these ethos-building ways, they need to know what kind of behaviors you seek.

That means that you need to get input from everyone to identify the behaviors that speak the loudest to them and then let everyone know the behaviors with which they are expected to “show up.”

  • Create rituals, and stories that back up the behaviors and culture you want/expect.

Humans thrive on stories. Stories, in fact, help us become better people. They also help us connect with one another, an important factor in creating a robust, cohesive company culture.

Once again – and especially if the culture has change a bit – it’s a good idea to create a “map” with your business’ guiding principles and then distribute it to all stakeholders so that they have “directions” as to how to interact with others.

Having a strong work culture – one that is in evidence daily – helps employees feel secure when so much is up in the air.

As California continues to reopen its economy slowly, Southern California businesses may find that employees furloughed or laid off are no longer available to return to work. Helpmates has proven performers ready to work at your site or remotely for short- or long-term assignments, as well as for career opportunities. All of these individuals have been thoroughly oriented in Covid-19 workplace safe practices.

Contact Rosalie Villa, at 949-225-5016 or email her at mailto:rvilla@helpmates.com for more information. You also may reach out to the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more.

Getting the New Normal Right for Your Workers

Things have started a (slow) return to “normalcy” here in California as Governor Newsom okayed a slow re-opening of the state’s economy on May 8.

Garden Grove staffing

The fact is, more and more businesses soon will start to bring workers back to work and as the state’s economy very slowly reopens, your workers are going to need to get used to a new normal in the workplace:

  • Some will work from home full time.
  • Others will work from home part time.
  • Workers you need in an office or to work on-site may find that they have their schedules staggered.
  • Employers may need different policies for employees considered to be at higher risk of contracting the virus.
  • And so on.

Considerations for employers starting to reopen

First, understand that guidelines and even requirements may have changed by the time you read this. That said, here are some things experts (employment law attorneys, for example) believe employers may need to consider not only as they start to reopen for business, but also as additional restrictions are lifted over the coming months.

  • Employers may have to open in “phases.”

The CDC and the White House have recommended that the country reopen in phases (for example, golf courses and other outdoor venues first, retailers with curbside delivery next, gyms much later).

Yet employers also may want to get ready for opening in phases. That is: following government guidelines, employers may need to “open their individual business in phases by staggering the timeline for returning employees to work.” The idea is that employers need to “consider” which positions are most essential and start with those. Employers would need to orient on-site employees in Covid-19 safe workplace practices so that they can work at the employer’s location(s) as safely as possible.

  • Employers should plan for how they are going to deal with employees’ fears of returning to work.

While many laid off and furloughed workers may be thrilled at the opportunity to work again, others may not. In fact, some workers may be too afraid to return to work in the early stages of re-opening and employers may need to consult with their attorney regarding how to handle these employees.

In addition, many employers may be able to offer only part-time work, which could have an adverse impact on employees’ desire to return, especially if they were laid off and collecting unemployment insurance. Again, a chat with an employment law attorney may be in order.

  • As they craft a re-opening plan, employers will need to give special consideration of those workers considered at “high risk” of either contracting the virus or of developing severe symptoms if they do contract the coronavirus.

As mentioned above, employers may want to consult an attorney regarding risks and liabilities regarding whether to bring such employees back to work and what they will do if they require employees to return and what then happens if one or more high-risk employees is reluctant to do so. Employers’ actions will need to be balanced against the potential of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act and other anti-discrimination laws (such as age discrimination as individuals at higher risk of severe symptoms tend to be people age 65 and older).

  • Employers may have to reconfigure their site’s physical layout.

Social distancing guidelines will need to be followed during re-opening for the foreseeable future and so employers may need to reconfigure workspaces. Employers also may want to reconsider having employees gather in large(ish) groups, such as in cafeterias/lunch rooms and conference rooms. If so, employers will still need to provide workers with sanitary places to have lunch and take breaks.

Additional strategies employers may want or need to consider include:

  • Requiring that employees wear face masks when around others.
  • Placing signs throughout the workplace that remind employees and customers to practice social distancing, especially in hallways, offices, lobbies, etc.
  • Ensuring that workers practice social distance during shift changes.
  • Establish a maximum capacity for public and employee restrooms.
  • Consider modifying frequently touched objects, such as installing touchless water faucets in restrooms and foot pedals to open doors.
  • Holding fewer in-person meetings.
  • Creating or revising “crowd” plans, such as setting a maximum number of workers and visitors that may be on-site at any one time.
  • And more.

We anticipate California’s re-opening to be something of a “learn as we go along” experience, with employers and workers – and the government – guiding each other as we move back to some normality. We therefore urge all of us – employers and their employees – to move carefully and with great consideration and understanding.

Helpmates can help employers navigate their reopening as we diligently work to stay on top of Covid-19 safe practices. We also ensure our specialists receive orientation on these practices before they head out on assignment and update them immediately as changes occur.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you or reach out to Rosalie Villa, CSP, our chief revenue officer, for more information on our Covid-19 safe practices orientation at rvilla@helpmates.com.

A Helpmates Case Study: 60 Call Center Specialists Ready to Follow Work-from-Home Orders in Just One Weekend

Thursday, March 19: California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide “stay-at-home” order. Which meant that – unless they worked for what are deemed “essential businesses” – such as pharmacies, grocery stores, gas stations, banks, takeout/delivery restaurants, etc. — thousands of workers across the state would now end up working from home.

Not all non-essential employees can work from home, of course: dental assistants, hairdressers, waiters, front-desk workers, and more, can’t perform their duties from home.

But many types of workers can: those who predominately use computers to do their work.

Los Angeles staffing

The governor’s stay-at-home order affected two of our large call center clients at which more than 60 of our specialists work on assignment – on computers. Our clients had the weekend to ensure that their employees as well as ours on assignment at their site were up and running and ready to take customer calls by Monday. At home.

Our customers called us late Thursday asking for help in ensuring that our specialists would be ready to continue working on assignment from their own homes, on our clients’ computers.

Transitioning Helpmates specialists from working on-site to working from home: the logistics

After speaking with clients, four of our internal team members immediately called all of the affected specialists at home, letting them know what we were planning, asking if they have wifi and if they logistically could work from home. Our internal team members coordinated that all of our specialists stayed safe at home on Friday and explained that were starting the process of understanding how Helpmates could assist our clients and our specialists with working remotely.

We shared that we would be working through the weekend and would be in touch with next steps. Our goal was to have all specialists ready to go on Monday, eliminating as much disruption as possible.

We received the calls from our clients after 8 p.m., and we therefore were on the phone with our specialists until late Thursday evening.

Over the weekend, several members of our internal team, including our director of risk assessment, researched what our specialists needed to know in order to work from home and reviewed safe-at-home practices while working. For example: they would need to watch out for too many power cords within their work space (a tripping hazard) and would need a stable work table, and so on.

We also had to ensure that our specialists received the equipment they needed to perform their work from our clients. In addition, we went over liability/responsibility documents with our clients, ensuring that they understood the responsibility of having remote workers.

Keeping our specialists informed

Our specialists naturally were very concerned about the new work-at-home guidelines. They wanted to keep working and many understandably were nervous about being able to provide call center services while working at home. We made sure we explained their new work arrangement with them as much as needed, helping them look forward to their new work environment while also helping them get their new (home) workspace ready for remote work.

We therefore also spent a lot of time explaining what they could and could not do with our clients’ equipment as they performed their duties.

Results

Come Monday, March 23, all of the specialists working at our clients’ call centers the Thursday before were up and running from their homes with few glitches, taking the calls of our client’s customers. Our clients report that their customers haven’t noticed a downturn in the quality of the call center services they receive from either their own employees or ours.

We also have become well-versed in work-from-home responsibility/liability issues as it pertains to staffing agencies and their clients and are happy to help other businesses transition temporary workers to work-from-home assignments.

If you would like more information on how you can use temporary workers for remote-work assignments, contact Rosalie Villa at 949-225-5016 or email her at rvilla@helpmates.com.

Helpmates’ Proven Performers Prepared for Work in Our New Normal

We have oriented and prepared our top specialists in Covid-19 work safety best practices and they are ready to deploy quickly.

Whether you’re an essential business and still operating during our current safe-at-home reality or you’re hoping to reopen your business as you anticipate a relaxing of social distancing guidelines in the next few weeks, Helpmates has the proven workers ready for assignment, whether you need them to work on-site or remotely.

Irvine staffing

We’ve been staffing companies throughout Southern California for more than 45 years providing workers businesses need now and in the future. We have oriented our top specialists in Covid-19 best practices and they are ready to work safely and securely in any type of business situation, whether it’s in an office, a distribution center, warehouse, manufacturing facility, or even remotely.

These are some of our exceptional employees, people who have received consistent top marks from their previous assignments and they are eager and ready to be deployed to companies in the industry segments in which we place workers:

  • Office/Administration
  • Accounting/Finance
  • Human Resources
  • Healthcare
  • Manufacturing
  • Distribution/Logistics
  • And more.

We visit each of our industrial clients before sending our associates to work on-site and we provide Covid-19 safety support to our office-location clients.

Our clients have told us that our safety oversight visits protect not only our specialists, but also helps our clients improve their pandemic safety practices for their own employees.

In addition, while all of our Helpmates specialists already have received Covid-19 safety orientation, they will do so again right before they head to an assignment with you. We also ensure our specialists receive orientation in your company’s individual safety parameters and/or procedures before they head out for their assignment with you.

We maintain close contact with our specialists while on their assignments with you and make sure they stay up-to-date with new safety recommendations or guidelines as they change. For example, Los Angeles County’s recent mandate that everyone wear cloth face masks when in public, while Orange County in mid-April required that all workers in essential businesses such as grocery and liquor stores, pharmacies, gas stations, and places where food prep is done wear face masks. (This may have changed since this post was written.)

Here for you as you reopen

California will slowly start re-opening its economy in the next few weeks. Helpmates is prepared to help businesses reopen carefully as we have started orienting all of our new associates in Covid-19 safety guideline so that they are well-prepared for deployment.

Learn more about how Helpmates can help you and your workers stay safe now and in the months to come by calling Rosalie Villa at 949-225-5016 or via email at rvilla@helpmates.com.

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