Retention in a Recession: Not Much of a Problem?

More and more economists say the U.S. is getting closer to a recession: as of about mid-August, most were predicting its start in early 2021, possibly even some time in 2020.

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No matter when it comes, a recession is coming: they always do, same as the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. It’s a modern natural economic cycle.

Therefore, because it appears that one will be wending its way to us in a few months, what could it mean about employee retention?

Many people believe retention won’t be a problem. After all, recessions always mean more firing and less hiring, so employees “would be foolish” to leave a company when “every” company appears to be letting people go and not hiring new ones.

And this may be true, especially in the beginning and middle of a recession, when layoffs are rampant and the unemployment rate creeps up.

Recessions Always Come…And They Always Go

When the recovery occurs – and it definitely will – many overworked, tired, and stressed workers may start looking elsewhere: this is exactly what happened in the economic recover after the Great Recession (December 2007-June 2009).

In addition, if you weren’t a manager, hiring manager, CEO, or recruiter during the last recession, you may not have experienced how hard it was to find great employees, even though (as the link above states) companies (during the recession) were “reporting receiving as many as 1500 or more resumes in response to an ad on the national job boards. ….[Yet] we continue to hear the same message ‘where are all the good candidates?’”

What’s more, your top employees – the ones you kept during one or more layoffs – especially may decide to look elsewhere once the worst of the recession is over.

(Note: this also could benefit you, as you could end up hiring dissatisfied employees looking to leave their employer, what this post-Great Recession/2009 article dubbed a “turnover surge.”)

Bottom Line? Looming Recession or Not, Pay Attention to Retention!

Filling needed vacant positions is costly no matter how well the economy is performing. After all, recession or no recession, the current serious talent shortage will remain. Which means if you keep your top employees during a recession but let your second- and third- workers go in a reduction in force, you may wish you’d kept at least your second tier folks. Why? Because it could be quite difficult to find even good “B” players (see “where are all the good candidates?” above).

Helpmates can work with your managers and members of your HR team and create a workforce management plan that keeps productivity humming at your company no matter if the economy expands or contract.

Give a shout out to the Helpmates branch nearest you for more information.

Why Employees Leave: It Usually IS You!

When someone breaks up with us, the usual (unspecified) reason often is couched as “It’s me, not you.”

Think back on why you may have left past employers. Was it because you disliked your colleagues? Possibly. Was the work boring? Perhaps. Was the commute too long? That’s a given here in Southern California, so congrats if you found a position a short drive away.

All of these are valid reasons for leaving a job. But the number one reason your employees tend to bail on you: they don’t feel appreciated and/or they feel disrespected. Frankly, both reasons really are two sides of the same coin: it IS you!

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When 66 percent of employees say they would quit if they feel unappreciated, it’s time to take stock of how your company overall or you as a manager treat your team members.

Some Nationwide Employee Dissatisfaction Statistics

With unemployment still at historic lows across the country (as of August 2019), it’s really no wonder your employees are wondering if another position at another employer might be better for them. Some interesting 2019 statistics (from different employee surveys):

  • More than a third of workers are actively or “casually” looking for another job.
  • 73 percent of Generation Z workers (those about 23 or 24 and younger) reported that they left their job because it “didn’t meet their expectations.”
  • Almost half of all workers (48 percent) have left a job because it “wasn’t what they thought it would be.”
  • 68 percent of employees said they would think about leaving their current positions if they “didn’t feel supported” by “more senior employees.”
  • 81 percent of those actively looking for work said the main reason they started a job hunt was because they weren’t satisfied with their current work environment.
  • 75 percent of job hunters said the fact that they were passed over for a promotion was a big push for them to start looking elsewhere.
  • 26 percent of workers said that recognition for their efforts was one of the top three reasons why their stay with their employer, yet 17 percent said their boss/employer never recognized their work.

Some Southern California Retention Statistics

The good news for Los Angeles and Orange County area employers is that employee turnover for hourly team members actually is less than in 30 other large metro areas across the country. The region is, in fact, in the top 10 of metro regions with the longest employee tenure: 208.4 days in 2018. (Although it is sad/important to note that 208 days is only about seven months: hourly employees don’t even stay a year with their employers.)

Unemployment in Orange County was just 3.2 percent in July while it was 4.5 percent in Los Angeles County. Yet even with such a low unemployment rate, Southern California’s workers are exceedingly burnt out, with half of workers in both Los Angeles and Orange counties among the most so, according to the Orange County Register link, above.

Yet, according to the article, “locals may be sticking at a job longer than they historically would” and “despite all the chatter about a regional ‘exodus’ of population, California residents are among the nation’s least likely to move….[which] may lower turnover.”

The cost of replacing workers who quit you costs more in a tight hiring market such as today’s. That’s why it’s smart to partner with Helpmates so that you quickly can get a new worker to replace your departing employee quickly. We make sure our associates have the skills you need so that productivity remains constant while you search for a replacement…or take on our associate as your own.

Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you to learn more.

Helping Your Employees with Their Back-to-School Blues

Back to school is here! Children abandon playgrounds, the beach and video games and return to the classroom. It’s a big change not just for kids but for working parents as well, requiring parents to adjust their schedules for things such as taking children to school, attending parent-teacher meetings, school open houses, sporting events, and other extracurricular activities, as well as volunteering to help out with school-related activities.

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Both parents work in about two-thirds of all households with children, and they spend more time caring for their children than earlier generations.  In a survey of 1,000 working parents, 85 percent said they were surprised by the challenges that arose when their kids returned to school, with the challenge cited by most parents as being home when their children returned from school. Other concerns included attending school activities and meeting other parents.

It’s no surprise that stress levels for parents jump when kids return to school. What makes matters even worse is that there is little allowance made by employers to help parents through this more hectic period, as surveys have shown. But there are things employers can do to assist their workers in handling the return to school, not only helping workers but themselves as well — accommodating employees helps with morale and retention.

Flexibility

One of the primary ways employers can help is by putting flexible scheduling practices in place. For many parents, flexible scheduling isn’t just something that is nice to have, but essential for them to maintain a good work-life balance, to meet their obligations to both their work and family. Flexible schedules help both employers as well as employees.

For example, flexible scheduling and allowing an employee to work remotely would enable a parent to leave work early to attend a conference with a teacher and then finish a project at home afterward.

But for flexible scheduling to work well, it requires good communication between managers and employees as workers’ schedules change depending on school events or other obligations.

Scheduling Work Events

Another way employers can accommodate parents of school-age children is by planning work events during the day, rather than after work. For example, social events such as employee happy hours, team dinners or workshops can be scheduled earlier in the day to allow parents time to pick up children from school or other school-related activities.

Instead of beginning happy hour at 5:00, companies can start at 4:00, team dinners can become team lunches, and workshops can end a little earlier.

A Culture That Values Work-Life Balance

Enabling all workers to have a healthy work-life balance is important. It helps with employee morale, productivity, and retention, and so should be a part of the company culture. Companies need to show they value a good work-life balance by incorporating events for employees and their families as part of the company operations, for example, with company picnics or holiday parties.

Communication and Feedback

To determine the effectiveness of flexible scheduling, supervisors need to solicit ongoing feedback from workers. To do this, the company can send out short surveys to employees, allowing them to respond anonymously with comments and suggestions.

Company leaders can also lend their support by showing they recognize the challenges parents face. Managers can do this through emails, even discussing how they handle the demands of parenting and school.

Need someone to come in for even just a couple of hours one or two days a week in order to help a working parent attend a school function, or stay home with a sick child? Contact the Helpmates branch nearest you, let us know the skills you need and we’ll send you a talented temporary associate!

Getting Work Done When Your Mojo is Missing

It happens to everyone: there are just some days when it feels like a slog just to get the bare minimum done at work, let alone exceed expectations. And we’re not talking about feeling ill. We’re talking about when you have the blahs, when you’re kind of burned out, when you’re just not feeling it.

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How can you get motivated when you’re languishing in the doldrums like this? Here are a few ideas.

  1. Consider what is ahead.

Thinking about the future is always something that raises spirits. The future is always filled with promise and possibility. Think about the things you are going to do, the things you want to accomplish. Set some goals and plan how you are going to achieve those goals. This is always a good motivator.

  1. Read something motivational.

For example, you can read about a person who overcame adversity to achieve his or her goals and how the person did it. You can peruse a self-help book with ideas on how to get moving and accomplish your goals. Even reading aphorisms can be motivational. None other than Winston Churchill recommended them.

  1. Find a mentor.

A mentor is someone with a lot of experience who can help you with your own problems and career. A mentor can give you advice and encouragement on achieving your goals and overcoming your obstacles because odds are he or she faced the same thing at one time or another.

  1. Act as if.

Acting as if” means behaving as if you already had the quality or attitude you are trying to acquire. The strategy was first proposed by the philosopher and psychologist William James, the founder of a school of thought known as pragmatism.

“Act as if what you do makes a difference,” he said, adding, “It does.” Acting as if takes confidence. You have to believe in yourself, to believe you have what it takes to get the job done. If you believe in yourself, odds are you also have control over your thoughts, feelings and actions, which also means you are able to give more effort and are more persistent.

So, act as if you are motivated, and real motivation is likely to follow.

  1. Get some exercise.

This is a great way to re-energize. Exercise gets your blood pumping and gets more oxygen to your brain. It helps to enhance your mood and to think more clearly. There is no better way to get yourself out of the blahs. So take a walk or hit the gym.

  1. Meditate

You may not believe it can help, but the evidence shows it does. Many CEOs and military people meditate regularly. Like exercise it can help to reduce stress, improve your mood, and help you focus better.

  1. Get organized.

Organize your work space. Put things where they belong and clean off your desk. You will be surprised how this also will make you feel more energized. Studies have shown that people who have organized work spaces are more productive than those with messy desks.

  1. Focus on small victories.

In other words, think about not just your goals and whether you are achieving them, but whether you are making progress toward your goals. Just moving forward, making progress, is reason enough to celebrate and to give you motivation.

When you are working, don’t worry about the past or the future, but focus on the now, the present moment and determine to make the most of that moment, because everything else flows from that.

If one of your goals is finding a new position, take a look at Helpmates’ current opportunities. See one or more that look interesting? Follow application directions or contact the branch location nearest you.

Naming the Problem: Retention in a High Turnover Market

When it comes to leaving their employer, U.S. workers aren’t balking: the Work Institute (an employee retention consulting firm) in May 2018 predicted that one in four workers (or 42 million people) would opt to leave their employers that year.

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Why? Mostly because workers can: a growing economy and a very low unemployment rate provide employees options when they are unhappy at work and they definitely are choosing to exercise that option.

Southern California Isn’t Immune to Employee Turnover

Workers also are leaving Los Angeles’ area businesses at a quick clip. The Los Angeles Metro Region saw 16 percent employee turnover (which was lower than the overall turnover rate in the U.S, at 19 percent). This is much higher than the 10 percent turnover rate that’s considered “good.”

However, these figures are from 2016, when the unemployment rate was 4.3 percent in LA County and 3.6 percent in Orange County.

And now? Unemployment throughout LA County in June 2019 was 4.5 percent, while Orange County’s was 3 percent that month and so we feel it’s safe to say that turnover also has increased since 2016, especially considering low unemployment has been with us for several years  now: workers feel confident employers will be vying for their attention.

Who Leaves The Most?

Younger workers tend to quit more often than older workers. This makes sense, of course because they are in career exploration mode.

Job hopping – leaving employer after employer once they’ve worked there a year or 18 months or so – is common among younger workers as they look to either find the career and/or industry they enjoy. Job hopping does tend to stop, however, as young workers see age 30 moving closer.

When Do Employees Leave?

No surprise here: a good portion (30 percent) of workers leave within 90 days of starting a new job. This holds true for all age groups. The main reason is disappointment: the worker found that the job was a poor fit and decided to leave sooner rather than later. A company’s culture as well as a really bad work experience also are reasons employees leave within a mere three months.

What Can You Do to Combat Such Quick Attrition?

Understand that job candidates have plenty of options today. Particularly in a low-unemployment region such as Southern California, many of your candidates might be weighing multiple offers and they simply won’t put up with a poor fit – because they don’t have to!

This is why it’s critical that you take your interview and onboarding processes extremely seriously. You need to dig and understand what success means to a candidate and then work hard to ensure you set them up for success from the beginning: when they first see your job posting to their first few weeks in your employ.

Employee retention in Southern California is such an important issue that we are going to discuss it in blog posts over the next few months. Our next retention post – to publish Tuesday, September 17 – will continue the discussion on why employees leave.

Until then, if you need to replace a departing employee sooner than you expected and need a substitute ASAP, contact the Helpmates office nearest you. We will quickly find someone to come in while you look for a permanent replacement. But don’t be surprised if the terrific person we bring in turns out to become that permanent placement: many of our clients end up hiring our temporary associates as they work on assignment for them.

Take a look at our industry capabilities and give us a call.

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Why Are You Interested in this Job?

This is one of the top standard job interview questions, so expect to hear it at your next interview. Employers ask it because they want to know why you want to work at their particular company, as opposed to simply doing it to make money.

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This question also helps the hiring manager learn about your career aspirations and how the job fits into that, as well as what you know about the company.

In answering the question, there are two issues you need to address – why you want to work at this particular company, and why you want to work at this particular job at this company.

Why the Company?

In order to answer why you want to work at this particular company, you naturally need to know something about the business. That means you need to do research. There are a number of sources for this, beginning with the company website.

On the website you can find out all the basic information about the company – its history, mission, products, and recognition it has received. Check out the press releases from the company as well as the company blog if there is one. Another place to look is social media to see what you can learn about the business.

Research online as well to see what pops up in your search. Finally, can check to see if anyone in your network has information about your potential employer.

All of this research should enable you to come up with specific reasons why you want to work at the company. These reasons could relate to the reputation of the business, its leadership, the products or services it offers, its culture and values, its growth or success, or particular programs, such as its marketing efforts, community involvement or training programs.

What you need to avoid are answers that are too vague or general, things that could apply to any company, or answers that show you haven’t done your homework.

Why the Job?

You have told the hiring manager what you like about the company. Now you need to focus on why you want to work in this particular job. You have to show the hiring manager why you are the best qualified person for this job.

To formulate an answer, first take another look at the job description. What caught your interest about the job? Why did you decide to apply for it? You need to talk about what really turns you on about the job because hiring managers want to hire people who love what they do and are excited about doing it.

Your answer should also explain why you would excel at the job, what skills and knowledge you have acquired that will allow you to deliver an exceptional performance  and value. Your answer should cover both why you are interested in the job and why you would be good at it.

Again, you want to avoid answers that are too vague or general, ones that could apply to any job. You don’t want to give the hiring manager any reason to believe you only want the job because it’s available. You need to convince him or her that you are the perfect match for the position.

You need to show enthusiasm also, explaining why you find it interesting using particulars about the job. If the hiring manager senses a lack of interest, your chances of getting the job are gone.

If you need help finding the next job at which you can excel, contact the recruiters at Helpmates. We have many direct-hire, temp-to-hire and temporary assignments just waiting for your special skills. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

When Someone Takes Credit for Your Work

It happens much more than we’d like – we do all the work and someone else, usually a boss or colleague with more seniority or the person who ends up making the presentation – gets all the credit. Here’s what to do when someone takes all the credit for your great idea.

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When it’s a Supervisor

In seeking appropriate credit for your idea or work, you need to tread carefully. First of all, collaboration and teamwork are highly valued in business today, and someone who is intent on claiming credit may run the risk of not appearing to be a team player.

It is best to choose your battles wisely. Sometimes, for example, it is better for a supervisor to take over an idea in order to give it more exposure in the company and push it to company leadership. Focus on instances where your contribution was clearly pivotal to a project and important enough to possibly impact your career progression, where recognition is clearly warranted.

If your manager has been taking credit when he should not, it’s best to start documenting everything when working with him so that there is a record of your work and contribution.

After meeting with the supervisor, send a follow up email summarizing your conversation and make reference to your idea or work in the message by saying that you appreciate the opportunity to put your idea into action or, for example, take the lead on the project.

If you feel that a more direct approach is needed, here again, tact is called for. Making accusations is simply counterproductive. You need to show how giving credit benefits the team, your supervisor and the business. For example, one good business reason for giving credit is that it enhances morale, employee engagement and productivity.

But if you have a supervisor who is constantly touting your ideas as his own and refuses to give you credit for your work, the best course of action may be to look for another job. You need to ask yourself, is this really the kind of person you want to work for?

Good managers do the exact opposite because they know how important it is to employee morale. They are more than happy to offer praise and recognition to workers who have made important contributions.

When a Coworker Steals Your Rightful Thunder

You’re on a more or less level playing field here and so can assert your rights more actively. If you are working with a person who steals credit, again make sure to keep a record of who contributed what in a project. Don’t share ideas with the person when you are alone with him.

You also can set some conditions when working with him. For example, you can say you will only work on the project with him if you present it.

If the coworker steals credit constantly and deliberately, take the problem to your supervisor. Frame the issue as a teamwork problem — explain how his or her actions are affecting the working relationships among team members and needlessly causing friction.

How Important Receiving Credit When Credit – to You – is Due?

Again: maintain perspective and remember why you seek credit – to advance your career. But you may be working at a company where who gets credit isn’t an issue: whether you get credit or not has no impact on your career progression or promotion at the company. In a case like this, it may not even be worth worrying about.

Give Credit to Colleagues

If you expect to receive credit for your work, you should be willing to set an example and give credit to others when they deserve it. If you make a practice of recognizing others, they are less likely to harbor negative feelings toward you when you seek credit for yourself.

Helpmates has many job opportunities for Orange County and Los Angeles residents. Take a look at our current openings and if one or more look interesting to you, follow application instructions or contact the branch office nearest you.

 

Think You Don’t Need to Job Hunt Because You LOVE Your Job? You’re Wrong!

You always should be on the lookout for our next job. Yes, even if you absolutely, positively LOVE your current job. Even if there’s no hint whatsoever about a possible coming layoff. Even if your boss loves you and says again and again that she’ll never let you go.

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If things are so perfect in your current job, why should you always be on the lookout for your next one? Because things can change. And change quickly. What’s more, if you’re in a job we love, it’s too easy to become complacent and to just skate along. Yet if you truly want to advance in your career, you need to learn new skills and have new responsibilities. You’ll often get them much more quickly if you move to a new employer.

Take a look below for a deeper dive into why regularly applying for new jobs is wise.

  1. Things can change quickly!

You love your boss and your boss loves you. You love your duties: they are exciting and keep you engaged. You love your coworkers.

But bosses themselves leave and their replacement more than likely will not love you nearly as much. Your BFF at work can leave and be replaced by someone who soon becomes the fly in your at-work ointment.

Layoffs also can seemingly come out of nowhere. Yes, rumors often start flying weeks or months before layoffs are announced, but some employers are really good at keepingthis information  on the QT, surprising most everyone. In fact, some HR experts encourage employers to keep looming layoffs a secret.

  1. If you want to move ahead in your career, you often have to find another job.

Staying in a job you love often means you become complacent, even lazy. You’re not eager to learn new skills. Yet if you want to advance quickly, you’re going to have to learn new skills and stay abreast of changes in your field.

Some people do this as a matter of course, but many others need a “push,” and a new job often is just the push needed. And, while you don’t want to job hop too much, especially as you reach your late-20s, moving to a new position regularly often means you’ll progress up the career ladder more quickly.

  1. You’ll keep your job search and interviewing skills sharp.

Just because you go on a job interview, doesn’t mean you have to accept the job if it’s offered. But applying for jobs, participating in interviews, negotiating job offers, etc. keeps your job-search skills sharp.

In addition, as mentioned above, you may find your next perfect job, one that probably gives you a raise and helps you learn valuable skills.

  1. You’ll start clarifying what it is you want out of a job/career.

Interviewing and meeting people in other companies, hearing about what they do and what they can offer you helps you keep abreast of what’s going on in your industry, and how your professional peers and possible supervisors believe it’s evolving. You can start seeing how you might be able to advance within it, etc.

In a nutshell, always being on the job hunt means you’ll better be able to stay true to your career goals.

Still, the best reason to always be on the search for your next position is the first one on our list: things can always change quickly. And, because it’s best to find your next job while you still have your current one, regularly applying for new jobs and going on interviews means you’ll find your next position while still happy in your current one. You won’t be desperate and you’ll be able to turn down offers that don’t match your needs.

Take a look at our current opportunities and if one or more interest you, follow application instructions or contact the Helpmates branch nearest you.

When Your Candidate Receives a Counteroffer

With the job market as tight as it is now, employers need to adapt their hiring strategies to a new reality. One challenge employers face when attempting to hire new talent is dealing with counteroffers from their current employer, an entity no doubt anxious to hold on to their good performers.

Long Beach Recruiters

If you are a hiring manager, you can no longer assume that once you have made an offer and the candidate has accepted it, you have sealed the deal. That is why you need to discuss the possibility of a counteroffer with the candidate at some point.

Counteroffers usually are not something job candidates think about, and so are not well prepared to deal with them. Often, they are flattered that their employer is trying to keep them. They may give the offer serious consideration. After all, they can return to a job they do well and even earn more money doing it, as opposed to moving into a new and uncertain situation.

Your job as a potential employer is to help give them a clearer perspective because, once you examine counteroffers in more detail, they turn out to be more problematic than may appear at first sight.

The first thing the candidate needs to remember is why he decided to leave his job in the first place. It could have been because of a lack of recognition, because the job was no longer challenging, because there was no room for professional growth, or because of differences with a supervisor or coworker. Whatever the reason, the same conditions will still be there if he decides to return.

Another issue the candidate needs to consider is his status at his current company if he returns. It won’t be the same as before – he has attempted to jump ship, and that may change how he is viewed by the management. They know the person was not happy working at the company and eager to escape, and, as a result, may question the person’s loyalty and work ethic if he returns.

Also, it is possible that the former employer is making a counteroffer simply as a stopgap measure until it can find someone else to fill the position – someone more loyal to the company.

And, finally, as a potential employer you need to raise another issue – why did your candidate have to tell his supervisor he was leaving in order to prod the supervisor to increase his salary?

If the person returns, he may always be looked at with some suspicion. If he takes time off, managers will wonder if he is out interviewing at other places. The company may even begin to seriously look at potential replacements because of the possibility that he may decide to bolt again at the first opportunity.

The bottom line is that accepting a counteroffer usually is a bad idea. Studies have verified this, showing that those who do accept them generally end up leaving the company after a relatively short period of time. Bring this information to the attention of the job candidate, getting the person to look not just at the offer itself, but at the implications of that offer down the road.

As a potential employer, you can improve your position with a candidate by bringing up these issues in advance and making the person aware of the downsides of a counteroffer. Doing this, in addition to pointing out the positive things about the job you are offering, will help you land the talent you need.

Speaking of finding talent, contact Helpmates when you need help finding qualified workers for your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities. Contact the branch nearest you today.

Your First Job Will Not Be Your Dream Job

Coming out of college, you may picture in your mind the kind of job you would love doing – your dream job. It is one that pays you lots of money, is challenging, enjoyable, exciting. Unfortunately, the odds of finding such a job right out of the gate are very slim, for a number of reasons.

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You are still wet behind the ears, so to speak. You still need to gain experience and the proper skill set that will enable you to perform the kinds of challenging jobs you seek. Your first job may involve a good deal of grunt work, learning the ropes.

You may feel a little disdainful of this kind of work, after spending thousands of dollars and four years of your life earning a degree to prepare you for the working world. But you shouldn’t. It will help you to gain the experience and skills needed to take the next step in your career.

A second reason your first job is unlikely to be a dream job is simply because of a disconnect between what you imagine and reality. We all have an image of what a job will be like, but it seldom comports with real life. It is usually rather vague because we simply do not have enough information about the day-to-day work involved. And this is true even if you have talked with people in the profession. How can you be certain the first job you get is your dream job if you haven’t worked at any other job before?

Finding that dream job, determining your purpose in life and what you are truly passionate about, is more of a journey than anything else. In the beginning, you really don’t know enough about the working world to be so sure about your dream job. A career progression is about exploration. You may take a job you think you will like but find that you enjoy doing something else more. And this may happen several times during your career.

Moreover, there are many things that go into making a dream job other than just what is contained in the job description. These are factors that can make for work that is challenging and fulfilling or something much worse, such as the kind of supervisor you have, your coworkers, and the company culture.

Your destination is a way off. It is something you cannot even see when you take your first “real,” professional job. Your first employment should be looked at as a learning experience. Use it to find out all you can about your industry, your role in it, your company, and about yourself. Use it to begin the process of getting clear in your own mind what you want to do.

According to some business experts, your first job can be considered a good one if you have a boss who is not unreasonable, you fit in with the company culture, you look forward to going to work in the morning, and it provides you with a learning opportunity.

Today, when technology is advancing so rapidly, career experts say it is unwise to focus on a particular job, but rather on planning a career. After all, some jobs that exist now will be gone in the future. The better course of action is to think strategically about career development and look at your first job as just the initial step in your career, a place where you can begin to acquire the knowledge and skills and meet the people who will enable you to move to the next step.

If you’re ready to move on from your first job out of college – or if you’ve recently graduated and are still looking for that first opportunity, take a look at our current openings and, if one or more look promising, follow application instructions or call the Helpmates branch location nearest you.

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