Should You Start a Telecommuting Program?

Employees tend to love being able to work remotely/telecommute. In fact, it’s a sought-after employee benefit for candidates and offering it as a perk of employment definitely can help attract top talent.

But it’s not always a win-win for a company – or even for the worker.

Take a look below for the pros and cons for of a telecommuting program for both a company and its workers.

Anaheim staffing agency

Pros for the Employer

As mentioned above, offering flexible work schedules (including telecommuting) definitely can help a company become an employer of choice. In fact, many people say they would leave a current employer for another that offered a telecommuting perk.

Companies with a national/regional presence can save considerably on overhead, as they no longer will need to rent or lease office space, furniture and equipment for employees who work from a company’s headquarters.

Employees who telecommute do tend to be more engaged and productive.

Telecommuting Pros for Employees

Being able to work where employees want allows much more flexibility in their personal lives. For example, workers could work late at night and then take a parent or child to a planned doctor’s appointment the next morning without losing time “at work.”

Telecommuting can improve employee productivity because workplace interruptions are greatly reduced. There are fewer meetings to attend, no one stopping by a desk “just to chat,” and so on.

Employees can eat healthier (no access to the donuts in the break room) and exercise more (workers could go for a run/walk or to the gym instead of commuting to work). They could volunteer at a child’s lunch party at school.

All of the above adds up to telecommuting’s biggest perk of all: having more control over one’s day-to-day schedule.

The Problems with Telecommuting for Employers.

As terrific as telecommuting workers can be for companies, there are some problems inherent within it:

Employees can take advantage of their telecommuting situation.

Workplaces can lose the collaboration and camaraderie that often occurs when everyone is in close proximity to each other. There will be no brainstorming meetings together and ideas simply don’t seem to flow as easily when people “meet” via video chat.

Cybercriminals can take advantage of employee connections from home computers. Unless employers provide completely secure Internet access, companies may be putting private and/or proprietary information at risk of theft.

Why Telecommuting May Not Be as Great as Employees Think

Telecommuters do report feelings of isolation. This may not be a problem for those with families, but it can be a real problem for many people. Many of those who telecommute say they miss the camaraderie of being around colleagues they enjoy.

When it comes to promotions, etc.: out of sight out of mind. It’s true. In fact, one study found that half of those who worked from home  asked to return to the office due to loneliness and a sense that they were missing out on promotion and career opportunities.

If your company does decide to start a telecommuting program, make sure you set regular check-in opportunities for employees and their managers. Make expectations as to deliverables and how often employees need to check in explicit from the very beginning. You may also want to require that employees travel to the office at least once a week.

You also want to make sure telecommuting employees have an extremely secure Internet connection.

If you’re a company located other than Southern California and are looking for workers in the Anaheim or Los Angeles area, contact Helpmates to help you vet and place top talent. Contact us for more information.

Snooping On Your Competitors: What Are They Paying Their Workers?

As the exceptionally low unemployment rates in Orange and Los Angeles counties show little signs of abating, workers – as we discussed last month – are expecting more pay, especially considering the recent minimum wage increase in Los Angeles County and the coming (January 2019) increase in Orange County.

So what is a proper wage today for your workers? How do you know if your wages are competitive? What wage point do you need to offer to be considered an employer who pays more than average?

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For example, we did a bit of digging recently and found that pay rates for positions we typically fill for our clients (customer service representatives, forklift operators and administrative assistants, to name just three) are – surprisingly, considering the cost of living in the region – not necessarily above the national average.

Take CSRs and administrative assistants.  According to Indeed.com, a CSR in Brea is paid about 16 percent more than the national average for CSR pay, while the pay rate for an administrative assistant in Brea meets the national average, while Anaheim employers pay admins 11 percent more than the national average.

How to Find What Your Competitors Are Paying

There are many quick ways to determine what your competitors are paying their employees:

  • You can simply call and ask! (People truly are less secretive than we may think they are.) Make sure when you ask that you ask for rates that you specify position level (entry-level, mid-level, years of experience etc.) to get a more accurate idea of pay rates.
  • Check online job boards, look at your competitors’ open positions and take some notes.
  • Check with local trade organizations, local/regional SHRM chapters, chambers of commerce, even temporary agencies. (We can give you ranges but not actual numbers and we won’t tell you what we bill your competitors.)
  • Ask job candidates. They just might be happy to tell you what they’re being paid.
  • Check out the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Compensation Survey (OCS). It has occupation pay rate information for different geographical areas across the country. Here’s the one for Los Angeles-Long Beach (numbers are for May 2017, the latest available) and here’s Orange County’s (also from May 2017).
  • Explore Indeed.com’s Salary Comparison tool.

Caveat: Your Competitors May Not Be Who You Think They Are

You might think that once you find what your local competitors are paying, you’re good! But remember: Southern Californians have no problem driving 90 minutes or more for work. (We’ve already noticed that some Helpmates’ workers who live in Orange County already are happy to drive to LA County for work…and its higher minimum wage. They barely blink an eye.)  So comparing competitors physically near you might not be the ones to research so much as competitors to which your workers move when they want more money or better benefits.

Helpmates has been providing Southern California’s top employers with terrific workers for more than 40 years. We know pay rates! If you’d like to learn more about what competitive pay rates are in your area, contact the branch office nearest you. We’d be happy to help you ascertain what you should pay in order to attract top talent.

The Rise in the Minimum Wage and Your Temporary Workforce

The minimum wage rose to $13.50/hour in Los Angeles in July and will rise to $12/hour in Orange County in January. Couple this with the fact that it’s a hot candidates’ market today with unemployment in Los Angeles at 4.1 percent (in May) and in Orange County at an incredible 2.6 percent (also in May), and the best temporary workers have their pick among assignments.

So if you’re not paying even more than the new minimum wage going forward, you more than likely will find that your staffing partner won’t be able to fill your order because it won’t be able to find quality candidates at that rate.

Top Talent Wants More Than Minimum Wage

The fact that better talent wants more than the new minimum is understandable: not only should better employees be paid more, they often are. And they expect it.

What’s more, if you want a temporary person to stay with you for the duration of his/her assignment (or even work with you on a temp-to-hire assignment), you should pay top talent more in order to keep them working for you: underpaid workers may decide to look for better-paying work. Irvine staffing agency

Investing in top temporary talent by paying a few dollars more is still less than paying for wasted training, productivity and overtime when the best workers leave assignments for better pay.

The average tenure of a temporary employee industry wide is 10.7 weeks (in 2017), but Helpmates’ temporary associates stay with us an average of 17.1 weeks, 60 percent longer!

Billing Rates Need to Rise with the New Minimum Wage

In addition, chances are you might be asking your staffing firm to keep its billing rates low. At first blush, this makes sense from your standpoint: after all, the temporary workers aren’t your employees but the staffing firm’s and one of the reasons a company works with a staffing agency company is to  keep its staffing/workforce costs low.

But your staffing partner’s costs have just increased because the staffing firm has a ton of expenditures that need covering with the money it receives after it subtracts the rate it pays its employee (your temporary worker) and your billable rate:

  • Worker’s compensation
  • Payroll taxes
  • Benefits (to both internal and temporary employees)
  • Recruiting costs
  • Office lease and overhead costs
  • And so on.

Here’s a little-known fact: while you may pay a billable rate of $22.50/hour to your staffing firm and the agency pays its employee $15/hour, you may think that that 50 percent markup is considerable. But don’t forget all the costs the staffing firm needs to cover (as listed above). The reality? A staffing firm’s actual profits “are pennies on the dollar, low single digits.”

Sounds like we’re whining doesn’t it? Yet, just like our clients, staffing companies are in business to make a profit. If we continue to charge you the same but pay our employees more, our already-slim profit margin decreases even more.

Bottom line: the higher minimum wage requirements in Los Angeles and (in January) Orange County will affect the quality of the temporary workers your staffing partner is able to attract and place. You should expect your partner’s billable rate to increase and support its doing so.

In fact, Orange County employers may want to consider raising their own “minimum wage” now because Orange County residents can “cross borders” to work in Los Angeles County cities with the higher minimum – and they probably will.

If you’d like to partner with Certified Staffing Professional experts who have the tools to customize a temporary staffing program that will deliverable favorable results in this challenging market, or if you just want to better understand compensation and billing rates, contact us here at Helpmates: we’ll be happy to chat with you.

Helpmates Staffing Services Named as Best Place to Work by Orange County Business Journal

Helpmates Staffing has been named one of Orange County’s Best Places to Work 2018 by the Orange County Business Journal.

Run by the Business Journal as well as the Best Companies Group, an independent research firm located in Pennsylvania, the annual Best Places to Work survey and awards program identifies, recognizes and honors the best employers in Orange County.

To participate in the program, employers must:

best Orange County employers

  • Have at least 15 permanent employees working in Orange County;
  • Have a facility in the county;
  • Be a not-for-profit or for-profit business or government entity; and
  • Must have been in business for at least one year.

“This is our second time on the Best Places to Work list and it’s truly because of our great employees,” said Rosalie Villa, Helpmates’ chief revenue officer. “They truly embrace Helpmates’ values: our culture of teamwork and camaraderie, as well as our focus on service to both our candidates and clients.

“This award really speaks to the quality of our leadership and how their accessibility, transparency and commitment to Helpmates’ team members has made our staffing service known throughout the Southern California region as the staffing firm to work for among the area’s staffing professionals.”

Companies participating in the survey went through a two-part process:

  • The first part evaluated each employer’s workplace policies, practices and demographics. This part was worth about one-quarter of the total evaluation.
  • The second part consisted of an employee survey that measured employee experience. This part was worth three-fourths of the total evaluation.

The Best Companies Group managed the overall registration and survey process as well as analyzed the data and used its expertise in determining the final rankings.

The Orange County Business Journal published the Best Places to Work special report in its July 23 issue.

If you’d like more information about how Helpmates can help you find work with some of the region’s top employers or help you find some of the top workers in the region, contact the Helpmates office nearest you.

Is This Why No One’s Sharing Your Job Postings on Social Media?

Your company has what you believe is a pretty nifty job-referral program for employees: if they refer someone who ends up working for you for at least six months, the referring worker gets a few hundred dollars.

So you ask your employees to let their friends and friends of friends know about career/job opportunities with you. You also ask that employees share your job postings on their personal social media channels.

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You sit back and wait for the referrals to rush on in. But what do you hear? The sound of nada (if nada made a sound).

What gives? You ask employees to share your job openings, you reward them handsomely if a referral works out, they can easily hit “share” on a job posting, but candidates don’t respond?

Why?

It could well be because the employees who refer great people are really, really picky regarding who they will refer to your (and their) company: they only make a referral if they truly feel it’s a good match for both the company and the potential employee.

And so that downsizes their pool of referable friends/acquaintances considerably!

And regarding why those jobs that are shared don’t get a response? Indeed.com’s study of 10,000 job seekers, Privacy of Job Search, found that 24 percent of those looking for work are the least likely to share this fact online. What’s more, 50 percent of job seekers wouldn’t even tell a partner that they’ve applied for a new position. In fact, two-thirds of job hunters said they were concerned (very to somewhat) about their job search going public.

So when it comes to jobs that do get shared via social media? No one may apply because they are worried about being found out: if they express interest to a friend on social media for more information? Ooops! There goes their cover!

After all, according to the Indeed.com study, 52 percent of respondents reported that their biggest fear was having colleagues find out that they’re on the job hunt. This fear was far greater than the risk of not getting a new job (29 percent).

It’s a bit ironic: we tend to post great photos of our families, our activities and so on to all and sundry on social media. But when it comes to our search for work, mum’s the word.

If your Irvine-area company isn’t finding the right people for your openings via employee referrals, consider partnering with Helpmates: we’ve been helping companies in Southern California find great people for their temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire opportunities for more than 40 years and we’d love to help your company. Contact the Helpmates branch office nearest you.

 

Ideas for Revamping Your Employee Rewards Program

As the new year begins and new starts….start, it may be a good time to take a look at your current employee rewards program to make sure it’s one that helps your employees feel valued and engaged.

Take a look below for five ideas you may want to consider for revamping your rewards program.

Irvine temp agency

  1. How often do you reward employees?

If you reward hard work just once a year with bonuses, naming an employee of the year, prizes, etc., why not up the number of times you acknowledge a job well done? In fact, why not reward employees in some small way every time they go above and beyond or otherwise provide exceptional work and/or results.

  1. Give employees what they want, not what you think they want.

Take a survey: do your workers really enjoy the monthly Employee of the Month award? The Employee of the Year? Do they enjoy a Starbucks gift card when they hit a previously agreed-upon target?

Ask them and you may be surprised: perhaps more time off is a better prize than a plaque in the lobby. Points on their favorite airline also could be a winner. Even just a simple hand-written thank you note from the company’s president can be huge when an employee does something “small” but nevertheless outstanding while on the job.

  1. Are the rules for rewards programs/incentives fair?

Every employee in all departments in all locations should be eligible for your rewards program. If your workers start to believe that some positions or departments have an easier time of it in earning rewards they may become less engaged – even cynical – with your company’s plans, ethos and goals.

  1. Announce attaboys and -girls on social media.

And not just internal social media: praise and recognize employees on your public social channels. If the acknowledged worker is on a certain channel, make sure to tag the employee properly so that his or her social friends/followers will see the accolades.

  1. Managers need recognition, too.

Yes, your line supervisors are making sure to reward and acknowledge their subordinates, but are managers’ supervisors keeping an eye on their direct downline, making sure they are rewarded and acknowledged when they – or their department – do exceptional work?

Employee engagement and satisfaction is critical to your company’s ability to retain and attract top talent. Beefing up and/or tweaking your employee rewards program can be a “quick win” in your ongoing work to keep employees satisfied.

If your Irvine company needs top talent for your temporary, temp-to-hire and direct-hire career opportunities, contact the Helpmates office nearest you. We look forward to helping your company find and hire the best!

3 Things Your Staffing Firm Can’t Control

As much as your staffing firm works – and works exceptionally hard – to ensure that its temporary associates show up on time to your assignments and provide exceptional value for you while they perform the tasks and complete the projects you need done (placing many strong management/HR policies and screening processes/tests and procedures to do just that) there are three things your staffing partner simply can’t control:

Cerritos staffing agency

  1. Ensuring that a temporary associate absolutely shows up for an assignment.
  2. An associate’s personal life/financial situation and how it may affect his/her ability to put in a good day’s work.
  3. Emergencies in associates’ lives.

Before we discuss why a staffing firm ultimately can’t control these three things, here’s a bit of background about how Helpmates Staffing works a) to bring you the best candidates possible and b) makes certain as much as possible that they show up and perform well.

  • One hour before an associate is scheduled to arrive at your company on his or her first day, we call the associate to make sure he or she is able to get to work. We also contact our associates the Friday before a Monday start to let them know we’re excited for them and know they will do a great job on their assignment. We also often touch base with a light industrial or clerical specialist before the assignment’s second day.
  • We know that some temporaries interview well but then perform poorly. That’s why we offer our 100 Percent Unconditional Guarantee: if our associate doesn’t meet your standards, you pay us nothing. If you participate in our Employee Quality Assurance Program, you pay only for the portion of our specialist’s work with which you’re satisfied.
  • Our screening process is tough. We interview in-depth and in-person. We offer felony and misdemeanor background checks and drug screenings (based on your request and/or requirements), as well as reference checks (always). We also take an extra step and check each employee at the Department of Homeland Security’s E-Verify system. We also offer Integrity Testing, which evaluates applicants objectively on their attitudes regarding alcohol and drug use, employee theft and violence in the workplace.

Bottom line? All three things your staffing firm can’t control boil down to this: temporary workers are human and humans make mistakes. Humans also – thankfully! – have free will and if they decide not to show up on a morning after accepting an assignment, little short lassoing them and then dragging them work, there’s no way to absolutely guarantee if temporary workers will show up if they really don’t want to.

As soon as we know that a temporary associate hasn’t shown up, we will start working to find a replacement ASAP. We almost always find a replacement within a few hours or – at the very latest – for the next day.

If you’d like more information on our policies and procedures that help us find and place the best candidates for your temporary opportunities, contact the Helpmates office nearest you.

Finding Those Elusive Creatures: Top Talent

Non-news flash: the best talent is incredibly hard to find today. With the unemployment rate at its lowest in 17 years, most people who want to work more than likely have found it

This low unemployment rate means that employers are willing to look the other way in regards to less-than-stellar job histories, felonies on their record and more, leaving recruiters and hiring managers scrambling and almost coming to fisticuffs when it comes to attracting and snagging candidates with in-demand skills.

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All employers want to hire the best employees they can afford. And while it’s a candidate’s market – and then some! – out there, we’ve found four strategies that can help you find the hard-to-find candidate with the skills, attitude, background, and solid work history you seek.

Take a look below.

  1. Good people know other good people: work your current employees for referrals. And work them hard!

The great ones know other great ones: they tend to hang out with them, live near them, go to/went to school with them, once worked with them, and so on. So it’s time to put together a robust referral program. No more: “refer a friend to us and get a Starbucks card,” or “If someone you refer to us is hired and stays for six months, you get $100.” No. Too weak.

Instead, make it extremely worth your current employees’ while to refer their friends to you. Hire a referral and give the referee $200 immediately; give the person giving you the referral $500 if the new-hire stays six months and then another $500 if the newbie becomes a yearling.

In addition, help your applicant tracking system help you with referrals: some ATS platforms have plugins that allow anyone in a company to notify HR or another designated individual when one of your employees finds someone online who looks pretty darn good.

  1. Reconsider the resume.

We know: blasphemy! But hear us out. Many people would be great employees but a) they don’t know how to write a resume that showcases how they can help you or b) they hire someone else who doesn’t know how to do this! Many people – as you well know – refuse to tweak a resume to highlight the skills they possess that you need. And so because those skills are hidden, you never see them and thus lose out on a potentially terrific candidate.

Some work history/skill assessment alternatives? If the job is skill-heavy (such as for IT and engineering), why not offer challenges/competitions open to anyone? Participants must give you their name, phone number and e-mail address in order to play and if you find they play well, you can contact them.

  1. Move away from that job board!

You already know LinkedIn is lousy with recruiters (87 percent of your fellow recruiting pros use the site for sourcing and contacting candidates.). Jobs posted on Monster, Indeed, Careerbuilder, et al do result in lots of applicants but the screening/culling process can be a killer. Instead, take a look at the job sites your candidate prospects frequent: Dice for tech, AngelList for startups, Dribbble for designers, and so on.

  1. Create a standalone website geared to the type of talent you seek and offer advice, news, job openings (your openings only).

The site should be more of an informational site than merely a recruiting site. Post blogs that discuss trends in the industry, news about movers and shakers, how to find work in the industry as a whole, salary information, etc. Offer forums/advice where professionals can ask questions from experts and their peers. And then provide links to job openings at your company.

(If this site truly takes off and receives a lot of traffic from talented individuals, make a bit of money by offering industry competitors to advertise on your site; create your own job board!)

When you’re having a hard time finding the perfect person, don’t go it alone: partner with the highly skilled recruiters here at Helpmates. Whether you need someone in the HR, healthcare, finance, administrative, or warehouse/distribution sectors, we can help. Contact the Helpmates office nearest you today.

Why – Oh, Why! – is Organizational Change So Hard?

If you work in HR or in some management or leadership capacity at your company and if you’ve ever been part of a committee charged with some form of “organizational change management” at your firm, we don’t have to tell you plain fraught such a task can be.

Few of us like change. Even fewer of us at work like change and if we by chance do like change, well, most of our colleagues certainly do not. Nope. Not having it. We’ve always done it this way. Put it back the way it was before.

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Why do humans pretty much abhor change? Because we don’t like the unknown (better to deal with the devil you know than the devil you don’t). In addition, change means uncertainty: the suggested change could work, but it also could not and humans are hardwired to dislike uncertainty: it’s stressful!

What’s more, when it comes to organizational change many people worry it could affect them in negative ways, ways such as:

  • A loss of status or job security.
  • Fear of the unknown (as mentioned above).
  • Fear of failure (employees worry the change may mean they’re not up to the task of any new projects or duties for which they’ll be responsible).

So how can your company make organizational change easier? Take a look below for some ideas.

  1. Start a conversation. And then listen. Really

Decide which areas of your company or department could use some change and then look at them closely. Talk to members of your company/that department and get their take on what changes you think need to take place.

If you see one sub-set of your company or department that’s doing something great and you think you’d like to expand upon it, bring it up and then listen. Ask for feedback and listen some more. See what insights you can glean.

Now that you have your feedback, let everyone you talked to – or who answered a survey – know what you’ve learned. See what common threads popped up in different responses to your queries. Don’t neglect the “outliers” – those comments that may take you in a slightly different direction – they may be worth pursuing.

  1. Plan but make sure the plan is broken into steps.

Small and steady change is better than massive modifications that take place all at once.

  1. Share your vision.

Talk about how the proposed changes will improve your company. Explain how and why they will do so. Most importantly, show your employees how the proposed changes will make their lives better (place the emphasis on them, not on how it will make your business better). Remember, they are nervous that any change will affect them adversely.

  1. Communicate, communicate and then, when you think everyone understands exactly what’s happening and when, communicate some more.

You really can’t tell people too much when it comes to changes in their workplace. Remember: they are stressed. They are worried. They may be excited but there’s no certainty that change will be a success. Give them information. Tons of information. Accurate information. Answer their questions (even if they’ve been asked hundreds of times before).

  1. Thank people. Keep thanking them.

Organizational change takes time. You should thank employees once the change is complete, but you should thank them regularly during the process. Announce when milestones have been met successful. Name individuals, if possible, and work hard to name as many people as possible.

Many organizational changes involve new projects, projects for which your company may not want to bring on full-time employees until the change is complete. If so, consider bringing on skilled temporary workers as needed. Contact the Helpmates office nearest you to learn more. We look forward to being of service.

Busting Freelancer Myths

Do you think freelancers/independent contractors are good just for “quick fix” projects? You may want to think again because these types of professionals can be a great way to take advantage of their skills without committing to them full time. What’s more, it’s not true that any freelancer worth his or her hourly fee wouldn’t consider a longer-term freelance position: freelancing can be up and down income-wise and having a long-term project with a steady paycheck can be very attractive.

In addition, as the independent contractor works with you, you no doubt trained him in your processes and procedures. Why lose all that “cultural knowledge” after just a few weeks when chances are good that his skills could be used elsewhere, on another project and/or in another department?

Orange County temp firm

That’s just one myth. Take a look below for three additional freelancer/independent contractor myths and then watch how we bust each of them, below.

  1. Independent contractors aren’t for the important stuff. They’re there to take some of the strain off regular employees so that regular staff can do the “mission critical” work.

Hello!  Independent contractors may have high-level skills that are better than your current employees! After all, they have to stay on top of new technologies and strategies – their very livelihood depends on it!

  1. Independent contractors are lazy: they freelance so they can take afternoons off and go to the beach.

You know it and we know it: working as an hourly or salaried employee means you often don’t work hard. You get paid when you’re sick, when you take a vacation, when you decide you’re “just not feeling it” today, so you don’t give it your all on the task at hand and you know you still will be paid the same.

An independent contractor? If he doesn’t produce what his client wants, he doesn’t get paid. He isn’t paid to attend meetings (unless he builds that time into his hourly rate). He doesn’t take vacations (unless he works double time for more than a week before in order to get all of his deliverables….delivered).

What’s more, chances are great that a freelancer can do more in an hour than a regular employee can. Because he often has to.

So this idea that you bring in an independent-contractor for busy work? Chances are great that your employees already are overwhelmed and can’t handle their usual workload. A freelancer – after just a few days in training in “how you do things here” – has a very good chance of becoming instrumental in completing an important project or meeting a critical deadline.

  1. Freelancers will charge far too much for a project.

Yes, they will charge an hourly rate higher than what you pay your employees who perform the same tasks. That’s because the independent contractor probably doesn’t work a total of eight hours a day on billable work: there’s self-marketing to do, administrative work, invoicing, etc. It’s all work, but it’s not something for which he can invoice you. He only charges for the time it takes him to actually work on your project, not for his business’ administrative tasks.

What’s more, he’s responsible for his healthcare, the full amount of Social Security taxes, purchasing equipment, and other office necessities, etc. You, happily, are not.

Still…..

As terrific as independent contractors are, they do come with special rules of engagement: you can’t force them to work on your project where you want (in your office) and when you want (between 2-5 p.m., for example). Do so and you’re headed down the sticky-wicket trail toward a lawsuit from the independent contractor claiming you controlled him as an employee but you didn’t treat him like an employee (hello, benefits and PTO!)

So if you’ve thought of bringing in an independent contractor or two and are worried about what you can and can’t do with a freelancer, consider the alternative, a temporary specialist from Helpmates with the same skills.

Contact the office nearest you and tell us the skills and background you need for your project. We look forward to hearing from you!

 

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