Employee Retention Strategies that Work During Boom or Bust

You know that employee retention in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas is a major issue today because you no doubt are struggling with this at your own company. You also understand that most employees leave because they are unhappy in some way (and it often is because you disappointed them in some way of something you haven’t done for them).

Finally, you realize that your – perhaps – previous notion that a possible looming recession doesn’t mean your retention woes will abate.

Torrance staffing

We aren’t telling you anything you don’t already know: retention is a problem. A big one. To help, we’ve put together a short list of retention strategies that work whether it’s a candidate’s market like it is now….or not.

Take a look below.

  • Begin with the end in mind.

That is, hire only the best and aim with laser focus on job candidates’ character.

Yes, this won’t help you now if you’re already experienced a good deal of employee churn. But with every employee who leaves, work to hire only the best of the best from there on out.

Because top workers love to work with other top workers, the idea is to build an employee roster of the best-of-the-best. Which results in everyone being more motivated, productive and loyal because your company’s culture is one that provides the best and most engaging place to work…for everyone.

This tactic worked for Netflix, as it now enjoys an above-average employee retention rate.

  • Focus on developing great managers.

Ensuring that your managers are terrific makes great sense. They are, after all, the direct link between your executive suite and everyone else. Great managers help members of their team execute your company’s goals and vision; poor managers can allow everyone to become mired in personality conflicts and minutiae. Focus is lost.  Sturm und drang builds. Goals are unmet.

But if you tell your managers that their main job is to build great teams while providing them the leadership training and tools to do so, you’ll find that they – and the members of their team – stick around.

After all, they will have become a “great boss,” and people love to work for great people. As for “bad bosses”? Employees leave.

  • Empower employees in the decision-making process and create a culture of ownership

If you have an angry customer in front of you or on the phone and you decide then and there what you’ll do about it without asking your boss first, how do you think you’ll feel? Empowered? You bet! But don’t you also have a feeling of ownership: this is your job, your decision and your positive outcome? Going to feel pretty darn good about working for your employer? Yes, indeed! Plan to leave anytime soon? Probably not.

  • Build a values-driven culture/company.

What does your company believe in, stand for? What is its purpose? These concepts may appear woo-woo, but think about it: having a purpose (raising a family well, being of service to others, becoming wealthy so that you can give a considerable amount of money to a favorite cause) helps get you up in the morning.

Establishing some core values at your company around behind which your employees can rally can transform your business and fire up employees.

Examples of core values:

  • “We Support Employees’ Growth”
  • “We Work to Provide the Best Service to all Our Customers”
  • “We Aim to Delight Our Customers”

 

  • Commit to investing in employees’ personal development.

This includes not only professional development but also personal growth. That is, provide employee growth opportunities that help not only the company but also employees’ individual goals.

  • As much as possible, encourage autonomy.

Not every position at a company can be unsupervised, of course, but most can. Giving workers autonomy means they’ll have to take on more responsibility, allowing them to push themselves to “figure it out.” Most will blossom under such a scenario. Another benefit? Don’t be surprised if your workers become more engaged and passionate about their work. And who wants to leave a job about which they feel passionate?

  • Just because it’s work doesn’t meant it can’t be fun.

Encourage your workers to actually see and interact with each other. In person. (We know; what a concept.) Encourage employees to move away from phone and text conversations to face-to-face meetings. What kind of team rituals could you create that encourage people to get together regularly: monthly lunch potlucks, bowling nights, birthday parties, lunch and learn meetings, yoga class after work?

And let’s not forget employee rewards/perks, which can be both exciting and easy to think of in Southern California. For example, let employees know that after one year of employment, their name will be placed in a raffle for tickets to ComicCon (or Disney’s D23 convention for those so minded). Depending on how robust your turnover is, sweeten the pot and provide a large-ish gift for those who stay with you five years: guaranteed tix to ComicCon/D23, etc.

Housing is beyond expensive in Southern California. Could you provide low-interest loans or help with a down payment on a home for employees who stay at least 5 years? Or tuition help for employees and/or their children? Get creative. Ask employees what they would appreciate. Celebrate the awards when given. Let a four-year employee know that they have just one more year to go before they’re eligible for the benefits you’ve set aside. Anticipation in in this case can work wonders.

If an employee suddenly quits and you need a replacement quickly, contact the Helpmates branch nearest you. We can get someone in to replace the departing worker for a day, a week …or even “forever” (we can source, recruit and perform preliminary screening and interviewing for you). We look forward to hearing from you.

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